ERIC ED033997: SADC Project 1: Research Evaluation 1968-1969

DOCUMENT RESUME Ur 009 231 ED 033 997 sArc Frcject 1: Research Evaluation TITLE 19E6 -196S. INSTITUTICN Put Late Note Hartford City Eoard of Edu...

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DOCUMENT RESUME Ur 009 231

ED 033 997

sArc Frcject 1: Research Evaluation

TITLE

19E6 -196S.

INSTITUTICN Put Late Note

Hartford City Eoard of Educaticn, Ccnn.

ErRS Price

EEFS Price ME-$0.75 HC Nct Available from

69

139p.

ERRS.

Bus Transportation, Compensatory Education, *Compensatory Education Programs, *revelopmental Reading, *Disadvantaged Schools, English-i4econd language), Guidance, Health Services, Hearing Therapy, Psychological Evaluation, School Sccial Workers, Speech Therapy, Statistical Data, Student Testing, Test Results Connecticut, Elementary and Secondary Educaticn Act, Hartfcrd, Higher Hcrizons, Frcject Ccncern, Project Read, State Act fcr Disadvantaged Children

Descriptors

Identifiers

Abstract

The report is an evaluaticn cf those compensatory education prcgrams established in Hartfcrd by the State Act fcr Disadvantaged Children (SADC). The measured effects of compensatory education in Hartford and the extension cf a modified Higher Horizons program to all poverty area schools are the topics of two introductory essays. The Hartfcrd program has five interrelated segments, including guidance, school social wcrk, psychcicgical testing, speech and hearing, and health services. Each is reported in detail. The Higher Hcrizons 100 program, the Expanded Reading prcgram, business services, a prcject to teach English as a second language, and the services cf coordinators of instructicnal improvement are all associated projects reported in detail. Statistical data are given fcr Prcject Concern, a busing prcgram, and Project Read in the appendix. [Nct available in hard copy due tc marginal legibility cf original document. ]

(EM)

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION & WELFARE OFFICE OF EDUCATION

THIS DOCUMENT HAS BEEN REPRODUCED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED FROM THE

PERSON OR ORGANIZATION ORIGINATING IT.

POINTS OF VIEW OR OPINIONS

STATED DO NOT NECESSARILY REPRESENT OFFICIAL OFFICE OF EDUCATION

POSITION OR POLICY.

AN EVALUATION

1968-

SA DC

Pro ect I

1969

RCH EVALUATION, HARTFORD BOARD OF EDUCATION, 1969

01%

HARTFORD !BOARD OF EDUCATION

pc\

Medill Bair

re\

O

203.527.411111

Superintendent of Schools

LLI PREFACE

For the fourth consecutive year, and as only one component part of Hartford's many efforts to improve the quality of education in our city,

it is once again my pleasure to report that the emerging patterns for compensatory education continue, in the main, to be favorable.

Not

only can we substantiate specific evidences of pupil growth but we can,

at the same time, point with no little pride to several important areas where problems were corrected and programs improved. In reviewing th4.s document it is important to remember that in

Hartford, progress is a never-ending proposition.

While our reports

are often issued in response to statutory reporting requirements, our quests for program improvement are, in themselves, on-going.

Rather than

ending with the close of each school year, our evaluative efforts continue, and in so doing, provide us with an important source of information by which compensatory

and other programs can be modified, improved, and

possibly redesigned to help us focus our actions toward the development of a fuller and more productive education to help our Hartford youngsters.

Medill Bair Superintendent of Schools August 1969

RD AIRS

ADMINISTNATIVIE OFFICES

R411 NION STREET

0

NALIETFOND. CONNECTICUT

081011

TABLE OF CONTENTS Page

PREFACE.

LIST OF TABLES

ii

.

.

.

.

.

.

FURTHER INQUIRIES INTO THE MEASURED EFFECTS OF COMPENSATORY EDUCATION IN HARTFORD . . . .

1

EXTENSION OF MODIFIED HIGHER HORIZONS PROGRAM TO ALL POVERTY AREA SCHOOLS . Guidance . Objectives . . . Description . Problem Areas Analysis of Staff Requirements Evaluation . . . Summary and Conclusions

School Social Workers Overview Objectives Description . . Evaluation . . . Summary and Conclusions

.

.

. .

.

.

.

.

.

a

35 35 35 40 40 40

.

.

e

.

.

.. .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

. Health Services . Objectives . Description and Staff Requirements Evaluation . . . Summary and Conclusions

.

.

. .

a

41 41 41 42

43 43

I

.

18 18 18 26 27 27 28

29 29 29 29 33 34

.

.

Objectives Description Evaluation

.

.

.

HIGHER HORIZONS 100

.

m

Psychological Examiners Objectives . . Description . Evaluation . Problem Areas Summary and Conclusions

Speech and Hearing . . . Objectives Description . Problem Areas . . Evaluation . Summary and Conclusions

14

.

.

.

.

a

44 44 44 47 48

.

.

49. 50

.

52

II

il

Part 1 Changes in Measured Intelligence Part 2 Growth in Reading Achievement Part 3 Development of Writing Skills . Part 4 Achievement Test Gains Part 5 Changes in Behavior . Summary and Conclusions . .

EXPANDED READING PROGRAM.

.

.

.

Analysis of Staff Requirements Evaluation . .

.

.

.

. .

.

.

.

a

.

.

.

.

.

.

66

.

67

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

. .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

0

.

Intensive Reading Instructional Teams Objectives . . . Description . . Parent Involvement Evaluation Summary and Cohclusions .

.

62 64 66

.

.

Expanded Reading Services Objectives . . Description . Staff Requirements Evaluation Summary and Conclusions

53 56 58 60

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

. .

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

68 68 69 72 73 74 75 75 75 78 79 88

90

BUSINESS SERVICES Objective Description and Staff Requirements Evaluation .

.

.

.

.

.

a

.

a

a a

90 90 90

91

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE . Objectives Description . a Analysis of Staff Requirements . Problem Areas . . Evaluation . . Summary and Conclusions

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

91 91 95 96 97 99

.

101

0 .

.

.

.

.

.

.

COORDINATORS OF INSTRUCTIONAL IMPROVEMENT

.

Objective and Description Evaluation .

.

O

101 101

102

PROJECT CONCERN (omitted) PROJECT READ (omitted)

o

102 103

APPENDIX Summary Evaluation of r. A. 35 Programs for Fiscal Year 1969

iv

103

LIST OF TABLES Page

Table I.

II.

An Analysis of Group Test Scores and Variances From Grade Level . Expectancy, Validated Schools 1964-1965 to 1968-69

2

An Analysis of Group Test Scores and Variances From Grade Level Expectancy, Non-Validated Schools 1964-1965 to 1968-69

3

Composite Achievement Test Scores and Variances From Grade . Level Expectancy .

6

.

III.

-Hly.

An Analysis-of-Group Test Scores- and Percents of Expectancy 1967, 1968, and 1969 Groups .

.

1.

SADC Counselor Assignments, 1968-1969

2.

Comparison of Effective Project Activities As Reported by SADC Counselors Over A Three Year Period, 1966-67 to 1968-69 .

3.

.

A Summary of 78 Senior Post Graduation Plans, As Reported By . One SADC Counselor, Spring 1969 .

4.

SADC Social Worker Assignments, 1968-69

5.

A Comparison of SADC Social Work Referrals, 1967-69

6.

Comparison of Activities of SADC Social Workers, 1967-1969.

7.

Comparison of SADC Social Work Case Loads, 1967-68 to 1968-69 .

8.

A Comparison of City-Wide School Social Work Services Over A Three Year Period, 1967-1969 .

9.

.

.

.

.

Degree to Which Teacher Understanding Was Effected, October 1968-June 1969 .

10.

Analysis of Speech and Hearing Referrals 1968-69

11.

Comparisons of SADC Nursing Activity in Validated Schools, . . 1965-69 .

.

.

.

12.

12a.

13.

Activities of One SADC Dental Hygienist, 1967-1969

15.

17.

18.

.

19

.

21

.

23

.

30

.

31

.

32 32

.

33

.

37

.

41a

.

45

.

47

54

Comparison of Mean Non-Verbal Intelligence Score Changes Spring 1968 - Spring 1969 Comparison of Selected Metropolitan Achievement Test Mean Grade . . Equivalent Reading Scores, Spring 1968-Spring 1969 Comparison of SRA Writing Skill Percentile Changes, ; . Fall 1968 - Spring 1969

.

55

.

57

.

.

.

59

Comparison of Selected Mean Grade Equivalent Arithmetic Achievement Test Scores, Spring 1968-Spring 1969

.

.

.

61

Comparison of Mean Student Ratings of Behavioral Change, . . Fall 1968 - Spring 1969

.

.

.

63

.

16.

8

Comparison of Mean Verbal Intelligence Score Changes, . Spring 1968-1969 .

.

14.

.

Comparison of Mean Teacher Ratings of Behavioral Change, Fall 1968 - Spring 1969

63

vi

Page

Table 19.

Comparisons of SADC Reading Positions, 1967 -1968 to 1968-1969

68

20.

SADC Expanded Reading Assignments 1968-69

73

21.

Comparison of IRIT Mean Reading Gains, October-Deoamber . 1968 Cycle

.

.

.

22.

.

83

Comparison of IRIT Mean Reading Gains, January - April . . 1969 Cycle

84

ESL Teaching Assignments, 1967-68 to 1968-69

93

.

23.

.

FURTHER INQUIRIES INTO THE MEASURED EFFECT$ OF CqMPENSATORY EDUCATION IN HARTFORD

1

Material presented in this report is an attempt to supplement and up-date the inquiries which were made into the measured effects of compensatory education in Hartford, and reported in the 1967-68 evaluations of the several ESEA and SADC funded programs.

2

As was true in the

previous study, the limitations inherent in the nature of group test results themselves, and in the variations in the groups of children tested,continued to place severe restraints on the numbers of conclusions which could logically be drawn from the data.

In consequence of these

limitations, the emphasis again was placed on the identification of the changing trends in achievement patterns which seemed to be evolving;

these

were considered for the city as a whole, for the validated and non-validated schools, and for schools by a poverty stratification.

Tables I and II show the extension of the longitudinal approach which was utilized previously for studying pupils who had completed their eighth grade in 1969.

For these students, verbal and non-verbal IQ

averages and average achievement test ratings (Word Knowledge, Reading Comprehension, Arithmetic Computation, and Arithmetic Problems) were recorded by school, and for grades 4, 6, and 8.

These averages were

further categorized; for the validated and nonvalidated schools, and for the total city.

For the indicated achievement areas, variances fram grade

level expectancy (i.e. the difference between the grade norm and the actual level of achievement) were presented in order to determine to what degree and consistancy academic lag was evident.

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City (all schools!) 97

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Var.

Wish

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'94'87

t

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1

.

1

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_____._

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__T Arsenal 87 82 Var. Barbour 95 92 89 Var. Barnard-Brown 86 78 Var. .---8-377 Brackett 88 87 83 Var. Burns 97 93 93 Var. Clark 87 85 Var. .._ ____t Fox t 95 93 Var. - ___-_-T: .Hooker 88 86 Var ___ __-;._- - -4-. Kinsella 83 Var. New Park 99 89 Var. ----;_-_, 1_97 Northwest 98 89 86 Var. ONIP l . 1 Vine 92 Var. ---- - -4West Mirdri106 86 83 Var. --HOMMI ..1.11:1

100

6

C. verbal

TABLE I AN ANALYSIS OF GROUP TEST SCORES AND VARIANCES FROM GRADE LEVEL EXPECTANCY. VALIDATED SCHOOLS 1964-65 TO 1968-69

1

1

1

tv

.

1

110

6

1

1

101

!

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102

1100

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Rawson

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A

101

101

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113

108

107

106

104-

-

98

1 109

i 100

-1-

1

1 105

1

1 100

97

107

.

L

93

i 102

Grade 6 1966-67

1.........

i

sr

;

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112

103

105

106

1

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99

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1

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92

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109

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109

94

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1 102

98

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Arith. Prnh.

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6.3 3.8 **These averages were calculated using the averages submitted for each school.

97

104

---"4=77. 3

112

95

99

109

102

108

95

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106

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98

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NON-VALIDATED SCBDOLS 1964-65 TO 1968-69 1. 0. ?inn -Vprhal

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10,0

4

vai...t___.4.______F_____1 Dwight 104 Var. ........... _ - -.La....7 -4 Fisher 95 90 Var. Kennelly I 101 . 107 106 Var.

Burr

Var-__ ....1

City (all schools) Var.

var.

1

i

1

Batchelder; 106

Non Validated Sch.

...:"

i

I. 0. vorhal

TABLE II AN ANALYSIS OF GRCUP TEST SCORES AND VARIANCES FROM GRADE LEVEL EXPECTANCY

From an analysis of Table I, several city -wide trends were apparent: 1..

The average non-verbal IC's for the city continued to remain consistently close to the national norm at all grade levels.

While the verbal IQ was close to the national norm at grade four, it followed the previous years pattern, and again dropped for 411

grades six and eight.

This drop was again expected since groups

took the multi-level, rather than the separate level of the Lorge-Thorndike test. 2.

3

The achievement ratings of the '69 group were generally consistant with those retorted for both of the two previous years.

Here

again an achieveftent lag of_slightly.more that one year was

accumulated by the time the students had reached grade eight. This lag differed little between various academic areas so that the tendency which was noted in the '68 group to show a slight lessening of lag in the reading, as opposed to the arithmetic areas was not sustained.

The diversification among the schools whyl had been classified as either validated or non-validated continued to be apparent%

Individual

schools within both of these categories s1wed ability and achievement characteristics which were more typical of the city as a whole, than of the subgroup in which they had been categprized.

In

addi)kln, some *4

schools continued to demonstrate characteristics which were counter to the overall trends of the city.

Thus, some Arage verbal IQ's did not

drop and/or some achievement lag tended to remain constant.

4

In the validated schools as a gro1,7P, the average IQs continued to be somewhat lower than those of the entire city.

The overall pattern for

the school was generally similar, with the drop in the verbal IQ coming between grades 4 and 6.

Again, this was not unexpected since the norms

were obtained for the latter group from the multi - level, rather than the separate level of the Lorge-Thorndike.

drop in

There was also a slight overall

T.Q. scores reported between grades 6 and 8, and in same schools

this was appreciable.

The achievement ratings for the '69 validated group did not continue the

tendency for the lag to decrease between grades 6 and 8, as was seen

for the '68 group.

Rather, and in all achievement areas including reading,

the '69 group demonstrated an increasing lag over the years recorded.

This lag generally represented an accumulation from grade level expectancy of about 1/2 year at grade 4, one year at 6, and two years by 8.

Thus,

the trend toward a slight resistance in the continuing decline in achievement,

which had been reported for the last two years was apparently not being maintained.

-6 -

TABLE 3

.

COMPOSITE ACHIEVEMENT TEST SCORES AND VARIANCES FROM

11. lo

=11110.

GRADE LEVEL EXPECTANCY 4.fte

MIMMY mIMM.

GROUP

1967 Group Norm Validated Composite Ach.

Variance fram norm Non-validated Composite Ach

Variance from norm City-Wide Canpcsite Ach.

Variance fran Norm 1968 Group Norm Validated Composite Ach.

Variance fran norm Non-validated Composite Ach.

Variance fran norm City-Hide Composite Ach.

Variance from norm 1969 Group Norm Validated Composite Ach.

Variance from norm Non-validated Composite Ach.

Variance frau norm City -Wide Composite Ach.

Variance from norm

41MW.

Yn

4.,

GRADE 4 .....e11.

.1m.

GRADE 6

GRADE 8

=11.

4.2

6,6

8.2

3.6

5.7

6.6

-.6

-.9

-1.6

4.6

7.1

8.0

+.4

+.5

-.2

3.8

6.3

7.1

-.4

-.3

-1.1

4.2

6.6

3.2

3.5

5.4

6.5

-.7

-1.2

-1.7

4.6

6.9

8.2

+.4

+.3

.0

4.0

6.0

7.1

-.2

-.6

-1.1

4.2

6.6

8.2

3.6

5.4

6.2

-.6

-1.2

-2.0

4.5

7.0

7.9

+.3

+.4

-.3

3.9

6.0

7.0

-.3

-.6

-1.2

The analysis of data which was presented to depict the lag pattern in terms of percentage of expectancy for 1968-69, was continued.

These percentages, which were obtained by dividing the grade expectancy norm into the grade achievement levels, are presented numerically in Table 4, and graphically in Table 5.

/

TABLE 4 AN ANALYSIS OF GROUP TEST SCORES AND PERCENTS OF EXPECTANCY, 1967, 1968 and 1969 GROUPS err.

ANO.A. My.

YONNIMIANyfty.. *Ma&

...

Word Knowledge

Reading Comp

4

6

8

4

ft

6

MIIMEMMIIIIMIOW

Arth Comp

my.. AY Y.

aalMa.11IbaaaNMNO.N.M.

GRADE

AN.

ft. .....80.w_

4

8

Arith Prdb

6

4

8

4.2 6.6 8.2

6

4.

asme.

NORM

taraaaftaa

naWa..aaawalaabaMOONtaw

4.2 6.6 8.2

8

Ayr..

4.2 6.6 8.2

4.2 6.6 8.2

4.0 6.2 6.9

3.7 5.9 6.7

VAL SCHOOLS *ft

67

Ave Grade

3.5 5.4 6.5

% Ext'

3.5 5.5 6.4

8313 78

82- 79-

83

M.YANIN

....May.. . ava

Ave Grade

3.5 5.2 6.5

68

Exp

79

83

-

3.3 5.1 6.4

89

.

82

MSO0!.

eNoY

3.9 5.9 6.7

3.6 5.6 6.5

ye.. NY

AMY. CIO

.

79

79

77

78

93

89

82

86

85

79

Aft

Ave Grade

3.5 5.2 6.2

3.4 5.0 6.0

...M.N. yiEw . Madn .n

69

% Exp

79

83

76

76

81

4.0 5.9 6.4

3.6 5.3 6.3

...e 4..ftrW MMie.aMa.

73

95

89

78

86

80

77

Nyyftamy.mNmNi.yft....

alaa araadallaa.MaaaaNn

NON VAL SCHOOLS AMAYEIN.M.......myraaafty

Ave Grade

4.7 7.1 8.1 ...I alma

a MN

67

111 107

% ExP

4.6 7.1 7.9 staaleaalawat

dinallamalsoa MomalarmooM

109 107

98

Ave Grade

4.7 7.0 8.6

4.5 7.2 8.1

109 110

96

107 109

96

...m.r ill.1 .00011111114.0.4.,

IN! 10M- M.4. .1M.IMN *A./.

68

4.6 7.3 7.9 miallanal..11.1Mwal

4.6 6.9 8.3

4.5 7.0 7.9

98

wt a-

4.6 7.0 8.2

0........02...11anta .11.nalra.aaa gam. Aanliaamaamosallal", OMMIdadbe

111 106 104

7. Exp

Ave Grade 69

109 104 101

4.6 7.3 8.2

4.5 7.1 7.9

.181Maaalalaa a. a 411aNIMaanam,ama.lloalle

% Exp

107 106

109 106 100

96

ada..als. Ma .ad! *aim, V.V INNS, ImMF . ,01.., aNn=... ..W4D

Aaa

racamaaraW.11

Waal.M.1.D.111

.1WMV.M wompaa0

4.5 6.9 7.7

4.4 6.8 7.9

emanana

109 110 100

107 107 96 107 104 94 Aft. as MANNr avyr %My. M..= um NY ...NY

1.ANYft

105 103

96

CITY ALL SCHOOLS 41.1

.INa

Ave Grade 6 7 ------7o Exp

ft

3.8 6.0 7.0

68

90

91

% Exp

4.1 6.7 7.3

3.9 6.5 7.2

98 102

84

92

89

my

-ANN.

3.7 5.8 7.1

ft

93

98

88

ft

4.4 6.3 7.1

4.2 6.1 7.1

105

100

yyyNMYMNY...

90

89

88 .....i

3.8 6.0 7.0 _

69

88

...a Am.

ml...11i1MIM..1VM =11.41NOMMI

Ave Grade

85

3.8 5.9 7.2

YONAMMY........

% Exp

3.7 6.1 6.9

Ia..

eft. ftft.

Ave Grade

y Army. yft

90

88 .../+

11

88

87

aye..M1Mr01

3.7 5.8-6.8

-

95 .41111OW

87 .0AM.

4.1 6.3 7.0

.............................-........._ - ......................-morMaD

91 a.a. i a

88

85 Wag.

88 0..ao

83

as

98 aallaal an1

95

85

ama. a w.r. aaar

92

.on

87 .1mmoM...40

3.8 5.9 7.0 ftrly. YAM.

90

............. Amy

89

85

COMPARISON OF ACHIEVEMENT TEST RATINGS IN TERMS OF PERCENTAGE OF EXPECTANCY,

1967-1969

TABLE 4 4

WORD

READING

ARITH

ARITH

KNOWLEDGE

COMPREHENSION

COMPREHENSION

PROBLEMS

GRADE

GRADE

PERCENTAGE OF EXPECTANCY NON

112

_

110

_

6

a

4

5

SCHOOLS 1"

.

11

106

104

102 AVERAGE

EXPECTANCY 100

96

GRADE

es

LEVEL

_

VALIDATED ea SCHOOLS

5

.

VALIDATED

FOR

GRADE

64

MINIMID

o

LEGEND

1907

196614"'"^- 1969

°it .

6

4

GRADE

5

-10 As can be seen fram the preceding data, the percentage of expectancy for the reading areas did not remain constant between grades 6 and 8 as had been the case with the '68 group.

It was apparent, however, that the

decline between grades 6 and 8 was less severe in t:Tord Knowledge, Reading Comprehension and Arithmetic Problems than for Arithmetic Computation. It was also apparent, and more important perhaps, to note that these

declines were appreciably less for the validated schools than for the nonvalidated schools.

In the non-validated schools, the average IQs were substantially

higher than those reported for the city as a whole.

There was sane drop

in the average non-verbal IQ at both the 6th and 8th grade level; this had

not been anticipated, and was not a function of testing with the multilevel Lorge Thorndike; this form had been used during the previous school year.

The composite pattern of achievement in the non-validated schools

was almost identical tc that found in both of the '67 and '68 groups. At grades 4 and 6 the achievement level was slightly above grade level while at grade 8, it fell slightly below.

An analysis of specific achieve-

ment areas revealed little deviation from this general pattern.

To further evaluate achievement trends in Hartford, a second analytical approach replecating that of the previous year's study was

utilized. This

approach, involving the cross-sectioning of schools by poverty associated factors, resulted in three levels of stratification. law incidence of poverty.

high, moderate and

By using these strata, it was not only possible

to compare the results of the 1968-69 testing with that of previous years, but also to indicate trends by socio-econamic level.

This latter factor

was particularly important when one considers that the allocation of SADC and Title I, ESEA services was made primarily on a basis of cultural and econanic deprivation.

While the stratified data have not been

presented in tabular form, two city wide trends were apparent from its inspection. 1.

Over the last testing period, there was a drop in the average IQ levels, both verbal and non-verbal.

The former declined from

96 to 87 and the latter from 98 to 94; nine and four point drops, respectively.

It was hypothecated that pert of the drop,

particularly in the verbal area, was a reflection of the change in tests fran seperate to multi-level Lorge Thorndikes. 2.

There were also declines recorded in all measured achievement areas.

while these were very slight in all areas, it was

interesting to note that declines were more evident in reading than in the arithmetic areas.

A comparison of averages between the validated and non-validated schools revealed that here there was a close correspondence to the trends which had been noted for the city.

Difference between these two groups of

schools were negligible, both in terms of the IC and achievement levels,

differing

only in arithmetic problems where the non-validated schools

declined while the validated schools showed a very slight increase.

When analyzed by stratification, added comparisons were noted. There were negligable differences between groups in the degree of decline observed for average verbal and non-verbal IQ's, and in the achievement area of Word Knowledge.

At the same time, schools with the highest degree of poverty showed the greatest decline in Arithmetic Computation, while schools in both the

moderate and low categories similarly demonstrated a lesSer degree of decline.

In the Arithmetic Problems area, low poverty schools showed the most decline, while schools in the moderate and high poverty categories revealed less decline, and in an almost identical fashion. The trend in Reading Comprehension differed from all others in that the differences between the three categories were most distinct.

Schools

with the highest degree of poverty showed the least decline in scores, schools in the moderate category the most and schools with the lowest incidence produced scores falling in between the extremes. In reviewing these cited differences, it should be emphasized that

the differences in the decline of achievement levels which had been noted, were of slight magnitude; probably these decreases are 'not

particularly significant.

They do, however, tend to lend some evidence

to the previously reported hypothesis that there appeared to be a reversal to the pattern of declining reading achievement in the schools with the highest incidence of poverty.

FOOTNOTES 1Material for this report was collected and analyzed by H. Burton Hicock of the Psychological Department. 2Robert 3. Nearine, patterns for Progress (Hartford: Research Evaluation, 1968), I, pp. 1-14. 3

H. Burton Hicock, Same Measured Effects of Compensatory Education in Hartford, Ipatterns for Proam: (Hartford: Research Evaluation, 1968), I, p.3. Here is briefly described the city's group testing program, the conversions from separate to multi-level teat instruments, and the concomitant drops in test scores which resulted from the conversions. 4

Ibid., pp. 6-8. 5

Includes Burns, Kennelly, Naylor and Webster.

Ibid.

Barnard-Brown and New Park. It should be noted that these schools receive 7th and 8th grade pupils from the Arsenal and Hooker districts, and that the feeder schools tend to report low verbal IQ scores.

-13-

-14-

EXTENSION HORIZONS PROGRAM TO AREA SCHOOLS M ei/ OF . .rMODIFIED m 4. sr.:IIGHER al 0-a gm .6 aALL POVERTY oN .0.1. :OP

(Hartford SADC Components I a-e)

Hartford's program of expanded special services was in many was a portent to the future of compensatory education.

First conceptualized in

the early fall of 1962, the special service program, like others which were soon to be developed, was designed

to assist in the removal of some of

the obstacles to learning which were currently existent in the povertyarea schools of Hartford.

The strategy for compensatory education was essentially a two-fold one.

First, the number of special service personnel - counselors, social

workers, psychological examiners, speech and hEn-ing therapists, and health services workers - were increased substantially in the target school areas.

Next, other specialized compensatory programs were developed

and these, too, were made operational in the total context of Hartford's instructional program; a program which was now aimed at the improvement of educational opportunity for the poverty schools of the city. The actual implementation of services followed substantial educational precedent.

Originated at the wish School only after the completion of a

years study under the direction of Hartford's Assistant Superintendent for Pupil Personnel Services, and following a model established by the New York City project of the same name, Hartford's Higher Horizons program was from its inception, an apparent success.

In consequence, and while

plans were made almost Immediately to encompass Alter schools in the program, available funds were non-existent, and so the program was allowed to languish. It was not until January of 1966, that the :ligher Horizon concept

was reactivated.

At that time, funds obtained under provisions of.the

Economic Opportunity Act, permitted a partial exnansion of the program to pix additional poverty-area schools.

This was followed by further

expansions under the provisions of the State Act for Disadvantaged Children in August 1966, to include coverage of all the fourteen elementary and two high schools which then made up Hartford's validated attendance district.

During the four year interval between 1966 and 1969, the established patterns of services and objectives were continued with only minor modifications.

These services and their evolved patterns of operation

are described in subsequent sections of this narrative. Remaining relatively unchanged was the overall objective of the program; an objective which could be suffiently described as follows: to provide the mears for children to compensate for environmental obstacles to learning which exist primarily because of economic deprivation, to the extent that substantial numbers of individual children can be better motivated to utilize more fully existent educational opportunities. Specific operational goals included: 1.

To provide target schools with services which can facilitate individualized instruction as a result of a more extensive knowledge of the individual child's abilities and potentials.

2.

To help ohildren from poor home environments adjust better to the normal classroom situation.

3.

To mobilize the activities of special service personnel into a team apnroach to learning disability; an approach which can be more effective in working with the parents and with the neighborhoods to provide for the child a climate in which he can better live, play, and be educated.

4.

To assist in raising the general academic levels of pupils the schools serving the poverty areas.

5.

To increase the motivation of the target students.

6.

To improve the sneech standards and performance of disadvantaged pupils, while at the same time motivating them to speak so as

to became acceptable candidates for higher education or job placement.

To give students experiences which will compensate for the art, music, and literature deficiencies which often exist in their homes. 8.

To help children to develop their musical and artistic

ability,

particularly where the potential and the interests are hidden. 9.

To acquaint pupils with,the literature which is a part of their cultural heritage.

10.

To make it possible for pupils to became acquainted with their city and its many points of interest.

Recognizing that the effects of poverty were often cumulative and could not be dissipated quickly, the program of special services was

designed to extend over a lengthened period of time.

Over this logitudinal

interval, it was hypothesized that a number of long range objectives could be accomplished. 1.

Disadvantaged students will eventually achieve an academic and cultural level which will enable them to compete for realistic educational and/or employment opportunities.

2.

Disadvantaged pupils can be expected to build a better selfconcept, more positive social values, and higher educational and vocational goals.

3.

Children, through education, will ultimately assist in raising

the standards for their families; thus

the living conditions

for a large number of people can be upgraded.

On the following pages is contained a brief analysis of the activities of each of the five project components during the 1968-69 project year.

Where possible, previous years data have been included for corporative purposes to add same measures of scope and sequence to the program.

GUIDANCE_ (Hartford SADC Component la)

OBJECTIVES

Now, in the fourth year of expanded operations, the guidance component again continued to direct its services toward helping students improve their total learning situation.

Because the greatest need for the

majority of the students who received guidance services continued to be the development of positiv'e attitudes towards themselves, their education and

their aspirations for the future, the components objectives were essentially

those of previous years; these have been listed as follows: 1.

Identify the abilities, interests and needs of 'disadvantaged' students and the placement of said students in special programs

which would challenge and satisfy these abilities, interests and needs. 2.

Help students develop the skills and attitudes necessary to seek additional education and employment.

3.

Provide the students with timely educational and occupational information.

4.

To encourage students to complete high school rather than becoming drop-outs.

DESCRIPTION Seven counselors and three secretaries continued to be assigned to Hartford's validated schools throughout the 1968-69 school year.

While

no particar staffing pattern was followed, assignments were initially made to develop the strengths of the program through the devel&ent of a continuity of services to each student.

As originally conceived,

students in the program would retain the same cpunselor over a period of several years, rather than only one year.

Due to staff ailzges, however,

this was not possible to the extent desired; of the seven SAM counselors, three were new assignments during the 1968-69 academic year.

The school assignments of the seven SADC-funded counselors were comparable to those reported during the previous project year, with only slight changes evidenced.

These assignments are shown in Table 1.

TABLE 1

SADC COUNSELOR ASSIGNMENTS, 1968-1969 Number of Positions

School

........

.

Assigned Grades

Arsenal

1

Barnard-Brown

1

K-6

Hartford Public High School

2

10-12

Northwest-Jones

1

7+8

Weaver High School

2

9-12

5+6

401.14 In conjunction with the several assignments, substantial numbers of

program activities were reported by the counselors; these, and the extent of counselor participation in each significant activity can be summarized as follows: 1.

Four senior high school counselors:

Individual counselling sessions Group counselling sessions

5210 130

Hcine visitations

8

Case conferences

79

School & college representative meetings

55

Regular guidance department meetings

107

-20-

Job Placement

18

Independent Parent conferences

128

Independent teacher conferences

453

Business & industry meetings'

16

Community meetings (Outside the school)

56

Guidance assemblies

12

Group guidance classes 2.

One Seventh and Eighth Grade Counselor: Individual counselling sessions

325

Group counselling sessions

20

Home visitations

25

Case conferences

50

Individual parent conferences

60

Individual teacher conferences

75

Business and industry meetings

5

Community meetings (outside the school) Guidance assemblies Group guidance classes 3.

0

10 5

260

Two elementary K-6 counselors.

Individual counselling sessions

702

Group counselling sessions

58

Home visitations

34

Case conferences

196

Individual parent conferences

154

Individual teacher conferences

770

Business and industry meetings

5

Community meetings (outside school)

11

Cultural assemblies

15

Group guidance classes

10

In reviewing the preceding listing, it should be noted that several of the cited activities were rated as being particularly effective by the SADC counselors.

Most effective activities can be compared over a three-

year period in the following table:

-2COMPARISON OF EFFECTIVE PROJECT ACTIVITIES AS REPORTED BY SADC COUNSELORS OVER A THREE YEAR PERIOD, 1966-67 TO 1968-69 o. of Counselors Re

Activity

1966-67 1 1967-68 11.11111111.7.11V=IIMMa.,....

111011r /10..

rtinca_

1968-69, ,M111011.11111,..0.1111.01111

More effective counseling Identifying students for a special programsa

6

6

11

Improved communications

5

5

14

Professional improvement

2

4

24

Organizational patterns

5

4

26

b

Developing of more effective counseling techniques

4

Home visitations Other owawwompo

a

-

Counselors are becoming more and more the facilitators of meaningful communications between staff members, staff and administration, and the school and the community. Contacts with community acc)ncies such as the Youth Opportunity Center, Community Renewal Team, Family Service Bureau, Catholic Charities, Jewish and Catholic Family Services; Urban League, V.A., YMCA, YWCA, Welfare Department, Juvenile Court, McCook HospiLal, Hartley-Salmon Clinic, and many others are indicative of the growing need for added expertise in this area.

bdounselors, have again been most instrumental in identifying special programs which they felt would be helpful in meeting the needs and interests of their counselees. Typical programa included,Work Study, Work Training, Higher Horizons,Upward Bound, HICUT, Childrens' Museum Science Academy, N.Y.C., Project Co-op, Talcott Mountain Science Program, the Independent Summer School, Programs of Hotchkiss, Ethel Walker, Westminster, Miss Porters, Oxford, Renbrook, Kingawood, Pomfret, Loomis, and the Catholic High School Summer Program.

In respect to the identification of spacial programs for students,

the following numbers of specific referrals can be quoted. 1.

2.

At the elementary level, K-8: Westminster and Ethel Walker Programs

15

Catholic High School Summer Program

20

Children's Museum Science Program

4

Summer Camp Scholarship

6

Hartford Vacation School Scholarship

2

Neighborhood Youth Corps

4

Summer Employment for Youth

7

Project Co-op

78

HICUT

12

For Hartford's three high schools:

Work Study

85

Work Training

30

Upward Bound

5

CONNTAC

1

Inter-Agency Services

25

The National As3ociation of Negro Business and Professional Women's Clubs, Inc.

66

Hampton Institute Summer Music Program

2

CONNPEP

2

Trinity Summer Program

Connecticut College

3

The HPHS for the Foreign La,*

rage Programs

1

National Conference of Christians & Jews

1

Girls' State

2

Southern New England Telephone Co.

30

YWCA

1

Hartford Dept. of Social Services

1

University of Hartford for accelerated students

1

An area of particular involvement for the high school counselor continues to be that of helping seniors with post graduation student placements.

Typical of this involvement are the figures reported by one

SADC counselor; these are shown in Table 3, below.

TABLE 3

A SUMMARY OF 78 SENIOR POST GRADUATION PLANS, AS REPORTED BY ONE SADC COUNSELOR, SPRING 1969

Plico

w.. =...

No. Reporting N-78 -

yr.^. emos.M

Cclleges and/or Technical Schoolsa

....mw

.1.m.

56

Apprenticeship Programs

5

Full -time Employment or Service

5

Undecided

6

Graduation in Doubt

6

a

..ftniwo+.

Includes 4 year colleges, 2 year colleges, and technical schools.

-24-

Some of the most encouraging results of the component based upon

an analyis available by the coordinator, were reported as follows: 1.

More and better guidance services are now being offered to

students from 'disadvantaged:ba*grcunds. 2.

More 'disadvantaged' students are finding their way into special

programs with the help of their school counselor. 3.

Partially through the efforts of the counselor, there has been a greater degree of involvement in community activities on the part of individual schools.

4.

There continues to be more meaningful communication between staff, administration, and community regarding the needs of students.

5.

A favorable counselor-student ratio of 1 to 210 has continued in grades seven through twelve.

6.

While the difficulty in measuring and evaluating attitudinal changes in students is recognized, it was reported that the

majority of students receiving guidance services under this component are responding favorably to the increased services. The effectiveness of the guidance component can be received in

terms of the pressing needs of Hartford youngsters.

Hopefully, some

degree of understanding can be gleaned from the following three case resumes, furnished by SADC counselors. 1.

was born in Puerto Rico and transferred from New York to a Hartford high school in September of 1968. During initial interview, she and mother indicated she had performed at average level in general program. Enrolled as a sophomore in similar program. She is one of four children living with mother on state welfare. stepfather is out of home but returns frequently and disrupts household. Mother is pregnant and expecting in September. Counselor assigned student to school social worker and he has helped to a great extent, visiting home, etc. to resolve family problems.

M has adjusted well to school and maintained A's and B's. Counselor discussed next year's programs with present teachers and we have upgraded her to the academic levels. Further, counselor recammended her for Upward Bound program at Connecticut College and she was recently notified she has been accepted. In addition, she will be in the Work Study program in September and be placed in a medical position at Hartford Hospital. She aspires to a career in social work. I feel all of our agencies and compensatory programs have been most meaningful in discouraging this young lady from becoming a dropout and has given her inspiration to persue a professional career.' 2.

'S started off the year at a Hartford high school with poor grades, a drop from last year. Her father came in to talk to me and her mother came in for a conference with her teachers. S was spending time with friends who were a bad influence but she resented her family telling her this.

She became a member of a group counseling session where she was able to express her resentments to parents and teachers. As she has gotten these feelings out in the open she is beginning to see her responsibility in the situation and feels that with a summer school experience this year she will be willing and able to dc much better next year.' "In her early school days, M was described as 'immature ... very lazy behavior problem ... fighting ... meddlesome ... poor work habits ... little self-control. She spent time in coaching classes and repeated Grade V. The pattern of 'making an absolute nuisance of herself in class ... has time to talk, fool and distract everybody else' ... continued in her first two years at a Hartford high school. She is presently a junior. Such behavior called for repeated conferences with teachers, psychological examiners, school social worker, school administrators, community workers, her counselor and her mpthex, to help the student adjust to the high school environment.

M seemed to have had little insight into her behavior and also lacked understanding in her attitude towards peers and teachers. The psychological examiner had recommended referral to the school social worker to which the parents did not consent. M visited the counseling department frequently and received considerable supportive help. Her demerits have steadily decreased from 26 in 1966 to 11 in 1969 and 5 this year. She is proud of her improvement, and is motivated towards a college education. She has artistic talent and has been encouraged with her fine ceramic creations, .

_s_ M would like to Leccine a medical worker and has had experience as a ward helper in local hospitals.

This student has made great strides in improving her self-image. With continued assistance, E.M. can develop into a satisfied young lady.' PROBLEM AREAS During the 1968-69 project year, several problem are:-.L1 were reported

to the counselors. 1.

These included in order of importance:

Demand for Greater Community Involvement on the part of counselors (2)

12

2.

Curriculum Revisions

20

3.

Space and Facilities

23

4.

Counselor Availability

25

5.

Clerical Duties

25

Six out of the seven SADC counselors noted the demand for increased involvement in community affairs, and considered it a valid problem area.

All schools, expecially those that are validated,

have to became more involved in community matters, and this involvement is a logical eAtension of the counselor's work in the school. Guidance facilities continue to be at their worst in the elementary schools.

For example, one elementary counselor is in a converted cloak

room, while the other is in a custodian's roam situated just off the stage and in the school auditorium.

It was again reported that counselors should be more available, particularly during the after school hours.

To do this on a regularly

scheduled basis, however, would take additional funds and these are presently not available.

47.r.

It was felt that the problem of clerical duties for the counselors was lessened somewhat this year.

This was due primarily to more

effective utilization of the counselor's time.

AIMASEATAFF REQUIREMENTS, The guidance component continued to provide funds for the employment of seven counselors; two counselors were assigned to the validated high schools and five to validated elementary schools. secretaries were provided.

In addition, two

One was assigned to a validated high school

end the other shared her time between the city's two other high schools. EVALUATION

A formal evaluation of the guidance component was again curtailed by a number of technical limitations. 1.

These have been summarized as follows:

Elementary guidance services were not uniform throughout the city, with staffing patterns of the 'one of a kind' variety.

2.

Guidance services were individually structured to meet specific student needs.

Consequently, the results of the services did not

lend themselves to an objectifiable evaluative effort. 3.

Language and communication handicaps frequently limit the effective usage of tests or questionnaires with both the parents and the pupils who are involved in a given program.

Consequently,

the use of written instruments for program evaluation were rejected. Because of the stated limitations, the component evaluation continued to rely heavily on two informational techniques: 1.

An analysis of reported counselor reactions.

2.

A compilation of counselor activities.

In analyzing data relating to the two informational sources, a

number of tentative conclusions were developed: 1.

Increased guidance and counseling services continued to be

made available to large number of disadvantaged students in tie

five of the city's target area schools. 2.

Counselors were able to identify the specific needs, interests,

and abilities of large numbers of disadvantaged youth, and were successful in placing many of these: youngsters in an increased

mm: 3.

of special programs, both within and outside the system.

While the difficul4y in measuring changes in attitudes was sully recognized, the SADC counselors reported that a majority of the students who received guidance services, did respond favorably to them.

ERWELAHLWOM1092 During the 1968-69 project year, the services of seven school counselors continued to be furnished to five of the city's 18 validated schools. services could best be described as facilitating or enabling.

These

That is to

say, services were intended to help students realize their potential through guidance and counseling, referrals to special proggims and referrals to other social agencies.

If one were to attempt to develop a fiomprehensive

assessment of the component's total effectiveness, it would also be necessary that.an assessment of all the associated programs be conducted; these were both numerous and intimately caningled as the report indicates. It seemed, at least to the reporting individuals that the major

thrust of the guidance component was the identification of students with special needs, and the subsequent placement of these students in programs which adequately met their needs. be eminently successful.

040

To this end, the component was judged to

SCHOOL 30CIPL 14CRKE2S

(SADC Component Ib)

ovtway Most educators, and narents for that matter, fail to remember that the child has a life which extends far beyond the length of the school day; an extension which may for the child be the more significant one. Usually, in fact, this is the case.

3amehow this outside world must be

considered, and penetrated, if the depressed area child is to be worked with effectively.

This consideration, nenetration, and articulation is,

in many ways, the prime goal of Hartford's social work nrograi. OBJECTIVES

S,ecifically, the continuation of eight social worker and one secretarial

nosition to service the validated schools was intended to: 1.

Develop a closer working relationship between the school and the hcme.

2.

Encourage parents to participate in the school program.

3.

Provide both the parent and the child with a contact for the further utilization of social services.

DESCRIPTION a

For the third successive year the services of eight added social

workers and one secretary continued to be provided under this component. While a description of the philosophy and scope of services rendered by the social worker department

where, is contained elaiiwhere,

1

the actual

"'allocation of SADC social worker time was considered as being germane to the intent of the evaluation.

Consequently, these allocations are

reported in Table 4. OIP.

1

Robert J. Nearine, Evaluation 1965-1966 Research Evaluation, 1966), PP. 24-39. -29-

Prokst64-1 (Hartford:

TABLE 4 SADC SOCIAL WORKER ASSIGNMENTS, 1968 - 69

.w.

.

. .m INEM -

.41M. 1 MOIIM ag ..01Mw

i..o. .1.....=0

. AlOra 111010 Percentage of Time N=8

School ...ovm..mgm

Arsenal

owrow.w..m.

soy

..,

.80

Barbour

.30

Barnard-Brown

1.00

Brackett Northeast

1.00

Burns

.70

Clark

.20

New Park

.80

Northwest -Jones

1.00

Vine

.70

Hartford Public High School

.50

Hartford Public :igh School Annex

.50

Weaver High School

.50

-.

MMIP

M-

Table 5 continues to document camponent social work activities, by longitudinally comparing reoorted figures which were submitted over a three year period.

TABLE 5

A COMPARISON OF SADC SOCIAL WORK REFERRALS, 1967 - 15 89 1111011111111111. .......111

MON

Percentage of total case load doma. elsow

Reason for the referral

dodo_

Change

ammo,

66-67

67-68

68-69

68-69

Behavior or personality problem

64

66

73

+7

School attendance

16

12

12

0

Underachievement

9

8

5

-3

Neglect or other environmental factors

11

14

10

-4

IN! 411

oar.

Since the referrals cited in the preceeding table cane, for the most part, from the principals and teachers,dAtta reflected a growing concern

about student behavior, and a tendency on the part of staff to refer children to the social worker for exploration into the causes. of adverse behavior.

Hopefully, these referrals were also made in an effort to

obtain any help which could result in behavior modification.

Since many

of the referred youngsters were also unditachievers, and were experiencing other environmental problems, the changes reflected in Table 5 were interpreted as a reflection on the emphasis placed by the source of referrals.

-12 -

TABLE 6

COMPARISON OF ACTIVITIES OF SADC SOCIAL WORKERS, 1967 - 1969

mr11111....

41, aM.11

11M.M.

0.

IMMO. .Sr-

11111111 YON!

Numbers reported

Activity

68-69

66-67

67-68

Pupil interviews

5537

5079

3996

Parent interviews

2019

1702

1579

Conference with teachers, principals, and other school personnel

5604

5418

4921

Contacts with carimunity agencies

3243

1935

2129

842

997

855

Home visits

0....

+Nam. MENEM.. 1

Agencies include mental health clinics, welfare agencies, medical resources, police and Juvenile Court. An inspection of the preceeding table shows that while the total number of reported activities does not equal those of previous years, the

workers actual case load had increased somewhat; a situation which is documented in Table 7.

TABLE.7

COMPARISON OF SADC SOCIAL WORK CASE LOADS, 1967-68 to 1968-69 0111=01.....WWWOUNOmhe00.,,..11WW.001..141.0..~Non.

416WW

4111.0111.0

Type case

Change

1967-68

1968-69

363

339

-24

1458

1671

213

S

Brief

Continued

Because of a wide variance in individual school staffing patterns, it was impractical to evaluate individual staff performance on the basis of any objectifiable criteria.

Rather, it seemed more appropriate to

compare the total spectrum of services rendered, and these over an extended period of time.

Consequently, figures representing three school years,

of services were collected, and these are reported in Table 8.

Note

that the figures reported represent the services of the total social work staff, and not merely those rendered by component personnel.

TABLE 8 A COMPARISON OF CITY=WIDE SCHOOL SOCIAL WORK SERVICES OVER A THREE YEAR PERIOD, 1967 - 1969

.............

......

Activity

welINIIM1111110.

1966-67

1967-68

1968-69

17,242

20,447

19,537

6,117

7,805

7,807

19,736

25,745

24,669

Contacts with community agencies

7,031

9,252

3,701

Home visits

3,070

3,679

3,701

../

Pupil interviews Parent interviews Conferences with teachers, principals and other school persom.el

EaM.INVIMO, 11.111Ina

While all but one categOry of services showed a slight decrease in the numbers reported, these were minimal and were attributed to expected

fluctuations in worker case loads which occurzed from year to year. At the same time, and for the third consecutive year, there was a reported rise in home visits; a salutory trend which was in keeping with the basic rationale underlying this, and other special service programs. EVALUATION

While the data, itself, was largely inconclusive,there were sane indications that the component was ccrtinuing to the stated objectives. 1.

Substantial social work services continued to be furnished to the validated schools in basically the same numbers.as was true in the previous year.

2.

Social work services in both the validated schools, and in the city as a whole, remained relatively stable over the past two years.

For the city as a whole, an increase was repeated in

the area of have visits.

At the same time, and in the absence of substantative data, to show that the component had been successful in developing added parental involvement, it must be assumed that the added home contacts would, in fact, result in the accomplishment of this objective, perhaps at a much later place in time.

SMEARY AND CONCLUSIONS For the fourth consecutive year added social work services were again provided to the validated'schools of Hartford.

While no measured

relationship between these services and observable pupil changes were obtainable, it was logically concluded that this component, like similar facilitating service programs, was a necessary one, and one which

continued to help make the school and the community more relevent for inner-city youth.

PSYCHOLOGICAL EXAMINERS

S:LC Comonet lc)

2=0 The role of the psychological examiner in the context of a pupil personnel team could be likened to that of an intelligence officer on a field commander's staff.

Working in support of the instructional program,

and in conjunction with the other special sorvice staff members, the examiner's role is to provide the commander - in this analogy the school personnel . with interpreted pupil intelligence, which only can be

obtained by an individual assessment of specified pupils.

Consequently, and

concomitant with its supportive functions, the objectives of the psychological

examiner component continued to be as follows: 1.

To provide the teacher, principal, and other staff members with

information about the needs and abilities of individual pupils. 2.

To assist the teacher, principal, and staff in the interpretation and utilization of the assement data.

DESCRIPTION During the 1968-69 school year, four psychological examiners and one

secretary continued to provide services to the validated schools of Hartford.

These services, which were provided in conjunction with the regular staff included: 1.

Individual psychological evaluations. a.

Individual intelligence tests.

These involved:

These, and other

supplemental tests, were tailored to fit the specific needs

of each evaluation. b.

Conferences with other staff members.

In this way, assessment

information was communicated to the teacher, and to other

school personnel whenever necessary. - "5-

c.

Written evaluative sLummaries.

Summaries were fulAlisheA to

the principal for school use in conjunction with each evaluation. 2.

Consultations with school personnel about specific children who had not been referred for testing, group situations, or other school problems.

EVALUATION In order to determine if psychological services could be directly related to behavioral changes in students, it was determined early in 1968 that a more intensive evaluation was indicated.

This determination

was finally focused on an attempt follow-up study of children who had been evaluated in October, 1968.

Aimed at determining the extent which psychol-

ogical services had directly effected children, the evaluation produced data which, in itself, was relatively useless, thus confirming the department's previous contention that it was virtually impossible to evaluate

psychological services as they effected the individual child. Any evaluation of necessity, must consider other programs and factors as well; these are ultimately responsible for the implementation of pupil change.

For example, and as the result of an individual evaluation, a psychologist may make a recammendation for a change in placement.

For one

reason or another, this recammendation may not have been followed, perhaps because special class spaces had been exhausted.

Even if the recommendation

were followed, any progress reports would be relatively subjective, and these would probably not relate directly to the' revaluation.

While information

cleaned might be useful from a clinical standpoint, it would be less than adequate for evaluative purposes.

The conduct of the follow-up study has, in many ways, a labor of love

-

since the psychological depaitment was particularly interested in assessing the effects of its services directly on children.

With the

help of the University of Connecticut's Dr. Chauncey Rucker, a follow up questionnaire for the teachers 01 referred children was devised.

Because

the questionnaire was to have been filled out some six months after the referral, a number of administrative problems developed, and was abandoned.

Instead, the questionnaire itself was modified consequently

by the initial plan with the psychologists asked to obtain the requisite information through an interview with the teacher. format The/evolved for the questionnaire attempted to utilize referral problems

as they had been stated on the child's referral form.

These problems were

extremely diverse and there was a great variation in the teachers referral statements.

Consequently, data fran this portion of the follow-up proved

to be relatively useless.

In the conduct of the follow-up, the 23 children who had been evaluated in October of 1968 were selected for study. the referring teacher.

Of these, 13 were no longer with

Consequently, it was often necessary for the

psychologist to directly indicate the degree by which the evaluation was

presumed to have effected the understanding of a given child.

This was

done by a series of ratings, with the scales summarized as follows: TABLE 9

rEGPEE TO WHICH TEACHER UNDERSTANDING WAS EFFECTED, OCTOBER 1968-JUNE 1959 ery None

Slightly Moderately Markedly Markedly

Child with original teacher

2

1

5

1

Child not with original teacher

1

3

3

3

1

For th

1-e.i.afned with Cie orginal teacher,

the modal rating of change was generally 'moderate' for the distribution. Similarly, ratings by teachers who had not referred the child showed a great deal of scatter, with equal numbers in each of the three rating categories.

Three other children who had remained with their teacher for

a very short time were not rated, and were eliminated from the study. Because the majority of the children had transferred away fran the referring teacher, it was extremely difficult to ascertain the effects of the psychological examination. It did appear, however, that psychological information was an important factor in changed placements.

Ten children were moved to some special class,

and quite probably the evaluation played sane part in this placement.

Two

other children were placed on home instruction and here, too, the evaluation may have contributed in this direction.

One child was committed to a state

institution, but it was unlikely that the psychological evaluation was of any importance.

Four other children changed schools or teachers; one was

suspended, tested, and kept out of school: here again, the effects of the evaluation were very much in doubt.

The section of the questionnaire which listed problems, and asked for a teacher rating of change was particularly useless.

Of the 10

children who remained with the referring teacher, 36 items which could be classified as behavioral or academic descriptions of the problem were to have been rated; for those children who had not remained, 28 items.

both groups the modal rating was 'no change'.

Of those who remained,

11 items showed some degree of improvement; but this was impossible to attribute to the psychological examination.

For.

P9-

In the completion of the questionnaire, the psychologist was also asked to indicate whether recommendations had, or had not, been followed. Again, the responses were scattered.

In 6 cases, a referral to the school

social worker was recommended, and in 4 cases it was carried out.

In one

instance, the parents are opposed to the referral.

In another six cases, a placement in the opportunity room for mentally retarded children was recommended.

In one case, the recommendation was

carried out, but in four others a lack of space prohibited iuplementation.

In three cases, psychiatric evaluation was recommended; in two instances, this was carried out, but in the third case the parents objected and the recommendation was not adopted. In three cases recommendation s were made regarding training in perceptual skills.

In one instance, the child was placed in a special

class; in another, the recommendation was partially carried out since the teacher made same attempt to work with the child despite her lack of training in this area.

In the third case, the teacher made no attempt to carry out

any special training, but did talk with the advisor of the program for the perceptually handicapped.

Most of the other recommendations were extremely scattered and diversified and included such items as 'child wear glasses-, 'the State Social Worker should work with the home',

'a better student should help

this child with his math,' and various other statements indicating a need for praise, support, and encouragement.

In most of these instances, it was

virtually impossible to tell whether or not any attempt had been made to carry out the recammendations.

Because of the limited number of cases for the follow up, it was impractical to draw conclusions regarding the effects of the psychological

-40-

services.

It did seem significant, however, to note that a number of

children did not remain with the same teacher, but did receive some sort of special placement; one which, in most cases, be attributed directly to the psychological evaluation.

ANALYSIS OF STAFF RE UIREMENTS vor the fourth consecutive year, the psychological examiner component WAS provided with the funds necessary to staff four psychological examiner positions.

Bevause of the shortages in qualified personnel,

eleven individuals devoted a poitlion of their time to the program.

PROGRAM AREAS

For the fourth consecutive year the same problem areas were reported. 1.

There remained a continued shortage of trained and certifiable personnel.

2.

This year, however, all SADC positions were filled.

Evaluative procedures, as described elsewhere, continued to be extremely time-consuming for the coo:Minator and have proven less than useful.

SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS For the fourth consecutive year, the continued employment of additional psychological examiners provided the validated schools with added psychological -services.

These services, which could not be evaluated

in terms of direct pupil change, are expected to continue to provide school personnel with assistance in the identification and resolution of individual pupil problems.

SPEgcH AND HEARING (Hdrtford SADC Component 1d)

OBJECTIVES The continuance of additional speech and hearing therapists in the

validated schools was designed to provide a dual service to many needy youngsters, a service which was focused on: 1.

The identification and correction of speech disorders which constituted a barrier to effective oral communication.

2.

The rendering of assistance in, the development of patterns of

speech which are both effective for communications, and conducive to an adequate self-image.

DESCRIPTION Seven speech and hearing clinicians continued to provide services to speech, language and hearing handicapped students in nine of the Hartford Public Schools during the 1968-69 school year.

Since these services included

a considerable amount of involvement which was allocated on the basis of

priority needs, and dictated by the severity of individual problems and the length of time that they had been in existence, it was necessary to Consequently, initial student

develop adequate selective procedures.

identification was obtained through the use of routine screening tests; these were administered to all second grade students, to all ninth grade students, and to all students actually referred for therapy.

The screening

was followed by an administration of the Templin-Darley Test of Articulation,

the Photo Articulation Test, and other clinician-devised articulation tests which were given at the beginning of the semester. Once the therapy was instituted it was obvious that an on-going evaluation of problem resolutions were indicated.

Thus, the Illinois Test

of Psycholinguistic Abilities, the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test, the -4'-

Slingerland Test of Perceptual -Motor Abilities, and other evaluative tests

were utilized when deemed appropriate to the assessment of progress. An analysis of speech and hearing referrals is presented in Table 10. Improvement figures were compiled from clinicians reports, while type categories were arbitrarily assigned by the coordinator on the basis of past experience.

TABLE 10 ANAL'LSIS OF SPEECH AND HEARING REFERRALS, 1968-69

1 Number Pismissed as Adequate

Type of Problem

Good Improvement

Minimal Improvement' Total

..EIP.O..w.wmlbra.mmwdir.dmmwmxmnmPWwridmmmmAwftwmmmm.msmpmmsr..wAMm.N1YW.O.WIIIMm

Articulation

125

148

296

23

Cerebral Palsy

1

1

Cleft Palate

2

2

Stuttering

46

6

Voice

59

7

10

Language

Hearing

,

38

10 43

5

16

16

131

Total

261

N.M1.= MOM.

. OmM. 0. . -

427

35

n%.

The clinical experience itself was focused on individual and small group therapy sessions.

These sessions were provided to 427 participating

students, with the number of scheduled meetings varying from one to five a week.

Sessions were focused on the amelioration of problems which

were particularly distressing: poor articulation, sound substitutions, omissions, distortions, and other problems which interfered with the intelligibility of speech.

were also served.

Other, and less serious types of problems

Mese included stuttering; language problems,

A(4"\ Thcluding those of cal eavironTental or foreign-language based nataje -41a-

-42including those of an environmental or foreignlanguage based nature; or problems related to hearing im2cirment; specific disability nature.

voice problems; and others of a

In addition, two children with repaired

cleft palates and one child with an etiology of cerebral palsy were participants in the program, also. Meeting the students individually and in small groups, provided opportunities to render added assistance for meeting pupil needs.

Some of

the children, for example, who were shy and withdrawn in a group situation responded to a one to one relationship, making gains both in self-confidence

and responsiveness to others in the school environment.

Several specific activities were effectively employed by the program. These inveAved the development of auditory discrimination skills, correct sound production, vocabulary and concept building, sentence structure,

sequencing of ideas, critical and expressive thinking, and the oral cammication of ideas to others.

Because of the general need for increased language facility and speech improvement existing within the schools, it was necessary that clinicians collaborate with principals, reading consultants, kindergarten and primary

teachers, and others, to plan and implement a speech improvement program. Thus, some of the clinicians gave demonstration lessons in the kindergarten and primary classrooms at periodic intervals while others assisted classroan teachers with suggestions and materials. PROBLEMS AREAS

The mutual cooperation of tha parent, the classroom teacher and the speech and hearing clinician was essential if the handicapped student was to acquire effective communication skills.

In the larger schools, especially,

it was often difficult for the clinician to arrange conference time with classroom teachers.

This, coupled with a high coincidence of parent

employment during the school day, and the lack of home telephone, often

made it difficultto effect meaningful exchanges of information. Scheduling was also a major problem in almost all of the schools. In the elementary schools, clinical sessions frequently conflicted with schedules for art, music, gym, library, industrial arts, homemaking, films, etc.

At the high school level, the time which was made available

for therapy

was limited to those periods during which the student was

scheduled for study hall.

In addition to the foregoing, it was also noted that same students continued to be housed in buildings which were somewhat removed from the central school building.This situation,wher, added

ne scheduling

confounded the problems involved in obtaining a time and a place for therapy.

EVALUATION In evaluating the results of the speech and hearing component, the coordinator reported that 131 students had been dismissed from therapy over dr

the course of the school.year.

The basis for this dismissal was the

achievement of an adequacy of speech and language skills.

In addition, 261

other students were judged to have shown good improvement, but were still in need of further therapy" while 35 students were reported as having made only minimal progress.

SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS

While the submitted data were again inconclusive, it was reported by the coordinator that children continued to receive speech and hearing services in substantially increased numb:,rs.

Added information for the

dzari1/i7 of further conclusions was not available at the time of this report.

HEALTH SERVICES (Hartford SADC Component Ie)

OBJECTIVES It had long been recognized by Hartford officials that adequate

health was a prerequisite to optimal learning.

Thus it was that the

city led the nation by instituting 1899, the first school health program in America.

During the intervening years, and through the course of many

changes, the program was gradually expanded to include all the schools of Hartford, both public and private; an expansion which was directed primarily

toward validated youngsters over the last four years. The objective of the health component have frequently been stated as follows: 1.

An improvement in the general health of the pupil.

2.

A Concomitant, and positive, impact on the learning situation; an impact which could be made by: a.

Minimizing the after-effects of pupil illness.

b.

Promoting good health as a necessary ingredient for optimal learning.

DESCRIPTION AND STAFF REggEoggs The Health Services component continued to provide funds for the employment of: 1.

One school nurse who was assigned to service the Hartford Public

High School and its ninth grade Annex. 2.

One dental hygienist.

An analysis of the SADC nurses's activities, together with some comparisons with previous years' figures, are contained in Table 11.

-.44-

-45-

TABLE 11 CCHPAPISONS OF SADC NIJESING ACTIVI1Y IN VALIDATED SCHOOL, 1965-1969a

I

Activity Number of individual health inspections Number of nurse conferences with parent a. at school b. by telephone c. by home visit Number of nurse conferences with teacher at school Number of nurse conferences with pupil a. at school b. at home

1965-66

1966-67

1789

3048

28

422 677

660

1

:

1967 -68

.

1968-69

5517

-3303

255 1177 18

+295 -443 + 40

377

504

836

-619

1319

711

1357

-8.479

14

-3

4

Number of pupils given first aid a. by nurse

622

274

1395

-11517

Number of pupils given vision tests a. by nurse

988

463

969

+1527

11

4i2

3

-1

Number of pupils for wham school program was adjusted a. because of vision b. because of hearing c.

other:

Number of pupils recommended a. for exclusion b. for readmission Mi-scellaneous

4

93.

130

162

-32

125 64

164 55

641 951

-310 -336

73

333

1053

:1.065

aEstimated from SADC and ESEA figures through June 1.

By inspection, Table 11 once again revealed that the reported

number of activities had shown during the past year.

substantial gains in several areas

Of particular importance during this period were

the following: 1.

The substantial increases were noted in the numbers of corferences held with pupils.

2.

The number of first aid treatments and vision tests increased slightly.

This was somewhat

n contrast to the large gains

reported for these areas during the 1967-68 school year. The second member of the SADC health team, a dental hygienist,

continued to serve six of the validated schools during the 1966.69 school year.

A tabulation of her activities is, reported in Table 12.

-47MN

TABLE 12 ACTIVITIES OF ONE SADC DENTAL HYGIENIST, 1967-1969

1968.69

1967-68

Activities

YIN/MM.

Now

.01.MON.

N

2755

5261

1020 Without decay: 1735 With decay: 264 Temporary teeth: a. 1200 Permanent teeth: b. c. Both temporary and permanent

2448 2813 1044 1623

No. of pupils examined:

eem

271

398

No. of pupils known to have started treatment

94

134

No. of completed cases after school examination

106

175

96

381

Total healthy mouths

1167

2764

Parent Consultations

133

262

Conferences with pupils

1033

2565

Conferences with others

1035

2107

No. of pupils in third grade who received prophylaxis

OINENN/...IMMM/MINIMO

cr#

Schools serviced include Arsenal, Barnard-Brown, Brackett, Clark, Vine and West Middle.

Frain an examination of the presented data, it was at once evident

that all activities showed substantial gains over the figures reported for the preceding school year.

This in itself was indicative both of the

dental health needs of the validated community and of the scope the services presently being provided to remedy and correct them. EVALUATION

The evaluation of the Health Service component was once again upon

-48-

based upon the continued assum,,riom that additional preventive and corrective health activities would eventually be refelcted in: 1. 2.

An improvement in the general health of the pupil population. fik consultant and positive impact cn the learning situation,

resulting from: a.

A minimization in the after.effects of illness.

b.

The promotion of good health as one of the necessary ingredients for optimal learning.

While no objective data is currently available to substantiate these assumptions, from the evidence reported, 1.

it seems clear that:

A substantial number of youngsters at the high school level received the services of the nurse in residence, as needed.

2.

The dental hygienist continued to provide the validated schools with professional services, and at a much higher level than was previously reported.

SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS The Health Service component, by employing one nurse and one dental hygienist, continued to furnish a substantial number of preventive and corrective services to poverty area pupils.

These services are presently

fulfilling the objectives contemplated in the health services proposed.

HIT'S?. HORIZONS 100 (Hartford SADC Compontint 2 a)

While suggesting increased academic vistas for one hundred disadvantaged high school freshmen the name, Higher Horizons 100, became in many respects a less than favorable title for one of Hartford's most salutory

While "HH

programs.

100," as the program was typically called, incorporated

in its operational philosophy many of the better elements in compensatc-y

education, the project's very name tended to obscure its signal achievements by merging them with the less than evident achievements of the several special service components.

In spite of this confusion in titles

the 'EH 100 program has continually proven, during its four years of operation, to be an unqualified success.

OBJECTIVES

Originally conceived as a self-contained ninth grade demonstration center which used as its main instructional vehicle, a concentrated attack against language disabilities, the program has subsequently evolved into

what could best be described as an unfolding structure for studentcentered education.

In its operational designs, the program focused on

the following objectives: 1.

Provide an atmosphere for experimentation, change, and development so that the particular learning problems of approximately one-

hundred selected disadvantaged students could be more successfully met each year. 2.

Assist the students in adjusting to regular high school patterns, and to program modifications as they occur in the future.

-4 9-

-503.

Provide remediation for specific learning deficiencies, particularly in the areas of reading and speech.

4.

Expand the experiential backgroans of the selected students bayond the levels which are currently attainable in their outof-school environment.

5.

Develop in the students an improved self- concept which will

hopefully lead to higher educational, vocational and life goals. DESCRIPTION In actual operation, the 1TH 100 project represented each year, an

articulated approach to compensatory education for a group of approximately one-hundred ninth grade youngsters.

Centered around a semi-cloistered

group of self-contained classrooms at Hartford's Public High School, the program, which was supported by a team made up of teachers and specialists,

motivated and encouraged students to benefit from and react to an individually structured educational program.

This program, which placed

a continued emphasis on several particularly successful methodologies, included: 1.

Small group instruction.

Situated in what was virtually a

"mini -house' setting, students were able to relate intimately

with team members, and with this relationship reciprocated,

were able to find adequate assistance in the solution of their learning Problems.

While some help come from the language

specialists and from the counselor who was assigned to the program, it most frequently occurred that the classroom teacher, occupying the role of 'teacher counselor'

(a role which the program was

intended to foster) became the youngster's most effective helper and, at the same time, a viable undcrstander of students.

-5,2.

Intensive counseling.

The schoo] counselor, who had been assigned

to the tcam on a full-time basis siLce the very inception of the program, was responsible for the project's testing and for coordinating the continued involvement of students, parents, and staff members in HH 100, and this at an optimal level. 3.

Teacher feedback.M.ough a continuing program of formal and informal gatherings, staff members were encouraged - and helped to react,

respond, and &dust to the needs of individual

pupils. 4.

Cultural activities.

In contrast to many programs, cultural

trips and experiences were pre-planned, coordinated through student participation, and evaluated as part of the instructional program.

During the 1968-69 school year, activities were

severely limited by the absence of available funds.

The composition of the instructional team has varied somewhat over the course of HH 100's four year history; as the result of personnel changes which took place during each school year.

During the 1968-:.C59

year, for example, the team consisted of an English teacher, a social studies teacher, a mathematics teacher, a science teacher, two. specialists

in language skill correction and development, a project assistant and a guidance counselor.

The position of team leader was initially held by

the reading specialist, and was later transferred to the English teacher during the early spring of the year.

The I1 100 student body, like the instructional team was also carefully selected, through the use of criteria substantially as follows: 1.

The students were to be divided between boys and girls, whites and non - whites.

-522.

Students were generdlly of an "averaue: tested ability or were rated by their teachers as students who could perform at an average level of achievement.

The use of 'average" test scores

included a verba) or non-vei:J:1 Lorae-Thorndike I.Q. which

generally ranged from 90-110. 3.

The recorded reading level for each member of the group was from one to three years below the appropriate grade level.

4.

The students were selected on the basis of emotional stability.

In establishing this criteria, it was stressed

that the participants were not to be considered serious disciplinary problems. 5.

The student age was kept homogeneous, and averaged 14 years, 6 months, as of September of the coming year.

All students were screened and approved by their feeder school counselor. 7.

Flexibility in the criteria was stressed; thus counselors could wake additional recommendations in special cases.

All

recommendations were, of course, discussed with the HH 100

counselor prior to the students' final notification and selection.

EVALUATION

To measure the effectiveness of the :Highex Horizons 100' project an extensive pre and post testing program using a Weaver control group was instituted, and this was further modified as the project unfolded. While all of the test data have not a- yet been analyzed, some of the completed results of the various testings, together with same added considerations for further program development, are shoran in the following pages of this interim report.

PART 1

CHANGE9 IN.ZASUFED INTELLIGENCE Problem.

While the language oriented limitations of group intelligence tests have long berm recognized, the use of data derived from group testing represents to the school cammunity, one of the more useful

objective indicators of academic aptitude which can be made available.

Because of this usefulness, and coupled with the assumption that an improvement in language facility would result in higher, and more realistic, ability scores, it was hypothecated that significant increases in average group test scores could be expected.

This assumption was

further supported by the fact that in all three preceding years, mean gains; albeit not generally statistically significant, were recorded in both the verbal and non-verbal intelligence scores.

This study, then,

represents a continued look at changes in measured group intelligence test scores, following one year of language-oriented compensatory education.

Design Routinely administered, as part of the city-wide group testing

program, both the verbal and non-verbal portions of the Lorge-Thorndike intelligence Tests (Level 4, Form A, 1954 edition) were obtained from all eighth graders in the spring of 1968.

Parenthetically, the obtained

scores continued to be used as one of the available criterion for the placement of students in the program during the 1968-69 school year. In June 9, a comparable form of the same test (Level 2, Form F) was again administered to the experimental group. -53-

Mean scores and standard

-54-

deviations were calculated by sex, and the significance of change assessed using a test of mean difference at the .05 level of confidence. Verbal and non-verbal data a7.-ereflected in the following two tables.

TABLE 12 COMPARISON OF MEAN VERBAL INTELLIGENCE SCORE CHANGES,

SPRING 1968-1969a

Sy.1968

S.rin. 1968

Mean V IQ_

...,N,

Mean V I

S.D.

Diff.

i

S D.

Mean Signif.

Boys

42

87.7

8.5

34

89.1

8.5

1.4

.34

Girls

50

89.9

10.8

43

89.8

3.9

- .1

.06

-------------.-----aAll figures have been rounded.

From _Ae preceding table it can be observed that the mean verbal I.Q. scores for the boys showed a slight, but statistically insignificant gitin, while the mean score for the girls declined slightly.

Similiar comparisons of non-vothal test scores are reported in Table 13.

-55TABLE 13

COMPARISON OF MEAN VERBAL INTELLIGENCE SOCRE CHANGES, SPRING 1968-1969a'

I. S rin Mean

Boys

42

Girls

50

-T

1968 1--

Spring 1969 Mean

Mean

N I

S.D. *a/WNW.

N

N II

S.D.

Diff.

Si9nif.

99.9

12.0

34

95.4

11.3

-4.5

.28

97.8

9.2

43

97.1

8.8

- .7

.38

aAll figures have been rounded.

Here, slight, but statistically insignificant mean decreases were recorded for the boys and girls in the Higher Horizons 100 group.

CONCLUSIONS.

From comparisons of the pre and post intelligence test it can be concluded that the program produced no significant mean changes in either verbal and non-verbal measured intelligence over the course of a year's time.

When the data were compared by sex, the girls who were tested with

the Lord-Thorndike Intelligence Tests tended to do slightly better than did the boys following the one year of intensive language instruction.

-56-

PART 2

GROWTH IN READING ACHIEVEMENT Problan Because of HH 100's underlying focus upon language remediation, several areas of inquiry into language arts change were attempted.

The first of these inquiries attempted to determine the effects of the intensive language-oriented program on changes in measured reading achievement.

Dig To assess changes in reading achievement following one school year of intensive language instruction,(Revised New Editions), and again in the following spring.

Word Knowledge and average reading test scores

fran the Metraglitan Achievement Tests (Advanced battery, 1960 Edition) were obtained fran city-wide testing, conducted during the spring of 1968 and fran the special HH 100 testing in June, 1969.

Where possible, means and standard deviations were calculated, by sex, for the several test A and tests of mean differences at the .05 level

of confidence were applied to the data. appear on the following pages.

The results of these calculations

TABLE 14 COMPARISON OF SELECTED METRCPCT,ITAN ACHIEVEMENT TEST MEAN GRADE EQUIVALENT READING SCORES, SPRING 1968-SPRING 1969a

S rin Mean

Word Knowledge Boys Girls

Reading Boys Girls

Sprin 1969

1967

Mean

GE

S.D.

40 47

6.1 6.2

1.4 1.6

41 47

5.9 5.7

1.3 1.0

GE

S.D.

35 44

8.1 8.2

2.1

35 44

6.7 7.0

Mean Diff

Sigaif.

2.0

2.0 2.0

4.6 5.5

1.9

.8

.9

1.3

2.1 6.6

.1160

a

All figures ara rounded.

CONCLUSIONS

An analysis of selected test data indicated that both the experimental boys and girls made significant gains in reading achievement when the group was with the ;Word Knowledge' and 'Reading' parts of the Metropolitan Achievement Tests following one year's intensive program of instruction.

In contrast to the reading patterns reported for the previous

year, the girls in the program tended to make larger gains, both in Reading and in Word Knowledge than did the boys.

From the test scores examined,

it can be concluded that the HH 100 program was effective in helping youngsters to significantly improve their measured reading achievement.

-58-

Pi RT 3

DEVELOPMENT OF WRITING snas Problem

In its approach to the correction of language deficiencies, HH 100

focused not only its instructional attentions on the improvement reading and speech, but on the development of adequate writing skills as well.

To

investigate the effects of this phase of the instruction, the following procedures were employed.

Design

The SRA Writing.Skills Test (Form A, 1961 Edition) wes administered to the HH 100 pupils both in the Fall of 1968 and again in June 1969.

Means and standard deviations were calculated, and compared by sex with a test of mean difference at the .05 level of confidence. these calculations appear in Table 15 which follows.

The results of

-59-

TABLE 15

COMPARISCN OF SRA WRITING SKILL PERCENTILE CHANGES, FALL 1968-SPRING 1969a

ring 1569

Fall 1968 N

Mean %ile

S.D.

N

....

Mean

Mean %ile

S.D.

Diff.

Signif.

e01/1

Boys

41

29.5

23.9

33

54.8

22.4

25.3

4.7

Girls

51

25.7

16.5

45

58.0

18.5

32.3

eJ

a

All figures are rounded.

Significant mean gains were recorded for both the girls and the boys in the HH 100 group.

These far exceeded the .05 level of confidence.

CONCLUSIONS

Following nine months of intensive language instruction both boys and girls in Higher Horizons 100 group produced statistically significant changes in writing skill achievement when these skills were measured by the MaLrias.a....rta'115.12A, given at both the beginning and end of the instructional period.

From this, it followed logically that the program

was effective in helping the experimental students to significantly develop measurable writing skills.

-60PAT

4

ACHIEVEAENT TEST GAINS

Problem In the development of the Higher Horizons program, it was assumed

that nine months of intensive instructional services would be reflected in some positive changes recorded on group achievement test scores.

This

expectation was based upon three assumptions: 1. The intensive language instruction would provide the students

with the skills which were necessary to cope with languageoriented group tests.

2. The configuration of the total program would provide the students with the motivation to honestly attempt to master the testing situation.

3. The development of academic skills typically measured by group achievement tests would be emphasized in the instructional program.

Des

The HH 100 students, as part of the city-wide testing program received selected reading and arithmetic portions of the Metropolitan

Achievement Tests (Form D and A Advanced Battery, 1947 Edition), in the spring of 1968; they were re-tested with a campatable Form F in June 1969.

-61The table which followE coatains a compilation of the 'Arithmetic Computation' and "Problem Solving' data analyzed by sex, as obtained from both the pre and the post testings.

Once again mean grade equivalent

scores and standard deviationa were calculated and these were compared using a test of mean difference at the .05 level of confidence. TABLE 16 COMPARISON OF SELECTED MEAN GRADE EQUIVALENT ARITHMETIC ACHIEVEMENT TEST SCORES,

SPRING 1968-SPRING 1969a

1

Spring 1968 Mean

f-AP-EI-r2'gk9§9----

Mean

.

N

GE

S.D.

N

GE

I

'

S.D.

Mean Diff.

Signif.

......-

Arith. Comp. Boys

40

6.8

1.0

35

7.3

1.4

Girls

47

6.5

.8

44

6.9

1.3

Boys

41

6.5

1.5

35

7.8

1.3

1.3

4.1

Girls

47

6.5

1.0

44

7.1

1.2

.7

1.3

:5

1.3 1.3

Prob. Solving

r.

a,

All figures are rounded.

The data supplied in Table 16, shows that significant gains were made in the area of arithmetic problem solving for the boys, only.

All

other gains were statistically insiginifcant. CONCLUSIONS

From the limited data available, it can be shown that the only significant mean gains recorded in measured arithmetic achievement were made by the boys in arithmetic problem solving. not significant at the .05 level.

Other gains were

PART 5 CliiqlgS IN BEHAVIOR

Prrbi em

Deficient motivation, long recognized as an inhibatory factor to successful urban education, was especially considered in the operations of HH 100.

Here, the relatively small number of pupils, coupled with a

high adult-student ratio (11.6 to 1) was intended to help youngsters

develop. not only a rapport with their teachers but at the same time, to It was hoped that this improvement

help them to improve their self image.

would manifest itself in positive modifications of school behavior.

Desian

To assess school-centered behavioral changes, a questionnaire was administered to the HH 100 group both at the beginning and end of the 1969 school year.

A similiar, and relatively compatable, questionnaire was

also given to the HH 100 teachers during the same time sequence.

Both

of these questionnaires were designed to answer the question, 'How has

the students' school behavior changed following nine months of small group

instruction and counseling?

Once again mean scores were obtained, by

sex, for both questionnaires and comparisons made.

Because relatively

few changes were observable on either of the 5 point instruments,a test of significance was omitted in favor of a detailed item analysis which had been scheduled for a fall completion.

Consequently, only the mean

comparative data are shown in Tables 17 and 18 which follow.

-62.-

-63TABLE 17

COMPARISON CF MEAN STUDENT RATINGS OF BEHAVIORAL CHANGE, FALL 1968 - SPRING 1969 -....-_

_

Srinq 1969_

Fall 1968 N

Mewl.

Mean Rating

N

Rating

Change a

WIN...M.m..MMO

Boys

38

1.7

37

2.0

.3

Girls

51

1.6

40

1.8

.2

----....

TABLE 18 COMPARISON OF MEAN TEACHER RATINGS OF BEHAVIORAL CHANGE, FALL 1968 - SPRING 1969

Soring 198 Maan

asing_1268 N

Mom

N

Change

Ratng

Rating

Boys

42

2.3

43

2.3

-

Girin

52

2.3

48

2.1

-.2

.............-----

--.................

.......

Data contained in the preceding two tables continue to indicate

little or no recorded behavioral changes in the HH 100 group following nine months of intensive small group instruction and counseling.

CONCLUSIONS From the preceding data, two hypothesis seem tenable.

First, the

HH 100 program does not produce observable changes in overt behavior over the nine month period of instruction.

Secondly, it is entirely

possible that the data treatment does not truly indicate the changes

-64which have occurred as a result of the program.

Consequently, both of

these hypothesis will be explored in detail, and this exploration will be discussed in a final report which is being prepared for distribution_ in the spring of 1970.

SUMMARY AND CONC,USICNS For the fourth consecrtivr year a ninth grade demonstration center for compensatory education continuPd to sulnly annroximatrly one- hundred inner -city youngsters with an artier' and nrogram of intensive language-

orirntrd instruction, cultural activities, and gridance.

In reviewing

several inquiries which w're d.-ve'oned as nart of the nrogram's on-going evaluation, the following findincfs rvo'vrd. 1.

while the areas of measured verbal and non-verbal intelligence genorally recorded s'ight mean decreases, these changes were not

statistically significant at the stated level of confidence. Neither was the slight increase evidenced by the boys in verb& intelligence a significant one. 2.

The HH 100 boys and girls made substantial gains, both in Word Knowledge and in the total. Reading scores.

Here, the girls

tended to amass larger gains than did the boys. 1.

The gain:

in writing skill develonment, for the second consecutive

year, once again far excr'eded both expectations and the snecified level of confidence. 4.

In the arithmetic areas of achievement there were mixed gains rpnorted.

Only the boys achieved significantly in Arithmetic

Problems, although lesser gains were amassed by the girl! in

Problem Solving, and by the boys in Commutation. 5.

Available data on changes in the modification of behavior continue. to be inconclusive and this area will be the subject of further inquiry during the coming year.

From evidence *resented, it can be concluded once again that the

Higher Horizons 100 com"onent continred to achieve the majority of its stated instructional objectives during its fourth consecutive year of

of oneration.

Furth-r incririrs end data ane'yses will he conducted

and thc'se will 11P thy- subjrct of a t;lis-qurnt rPnort, schPdulpd

for issuance later in th' year,

EXPANDED READING PROGRAM ;Hart Ford SADC Component 4)

For the fourth consecutive year the instructional department continued to marshal an attack upon reading disabilities through the medium of an expanded reading program.

This expansion continued to

involve: 1.

The employment and assignment of 13 and one-half reading specialists to the schools with the highest proportions of reading disabilities.

2.

Small group instruction by three Intensive Reading Instructional Teams, commonly called the IRIT program.

ANALYSIS OF STAFF_REQUIREMENTS All reading vacancies in both components of the expanded reading program filled during the 1968-69 scl}ool year.

A summary of these

positions, by component, is reported in Table 19.

-68 -

TABLE 19

..

COMPARISONS OF SADC FF15ING POSITIONS, 1067-1969 TO 1968-69

Position

1967-68

1968-69

1

1

12

12

Expanded Reading Programa

6

14

Secretarial Staff

2

4

,

Administrator IRIT

MIAINNIMM..=1.11111.11.111 OW.

410.

a

Includes 4 positions previously allocated to the reading clinic.

EVALUATION While the overall operation of both project components followed the pattern which had been established over the previous three years, a number of changes were reported; these have been reported by the coordinator in the following evaluative discussion.

EXPANDED READING SERVICES (Hartio:d Si1DC Calaponent 4a)

Designed to supplement and reinforce the city's regular reading program, the expanded reading component continued through its fourth year of operation to provide the validated schools of Hartford with increased numbers of reading services.

These services were due, in no small measure

to a staff of specialists, which increased during the last school year. In its initial conception, the expanded reading component provided

services to children with severe reading handicaps, and without regard to grade level.

During the 1967-68 school year, however, the program was

modified in response to the substantially increased weight of evidence supporting the contention that the syndrome of reading disability was present even in the earliest of yoars.

Consequently, and since it seemed

reasonable to assume that the earlier these symptoms were detected and provided for, the more possible it would be that later reading problems could be prevented,

the services of the program were shifted to focus

on the primary grade levels.

OBJECTIVES Specifically, the goal of the expanded reading component was to supplement and reinforce Hartford's regular reading program.in the validated schools of the city.

This reinforcement would, in turn, be reflected in

measurable improvements to the following behavioral objectives: 1.

An increased knowledge of letter names.

2.

An increased knowledge of left and right progression.

3.

An increase in the amount of reading attempted.

4.

An increased mastery of word recognition, as determined by vocabulary checks. -.6.9-

5.

An improved Lastbry of both oral and silent reading.

DESCRIPTION In the light of the progran's renewed emphasis on the prevention and remediation of reading disabilities at the primary grade level, the

specialists focused their attentions on second grade pupils, who received direct reading instruction during the first half of the year, and on first

grade pupils with evidences of delayed reading development who received similiar assistance during the year's latter semester.

Working under the direction of the principal, and with the guidance of the reading supervisors, the school reading specialist has devoted his

time toward the improvement of the school's total reading program; a program which was dictated by the specific needs of the given school. Services typically have included: 1.

Provision of a preventive and remedial program for first and second grade pupils who gave evidence of delayed development.

2.

Provision of consultant services to teachers and parents in developing an effective 'all school' reading program.

3.

Lending assistance in the initiation of the new reading program, Project Read.

4.

Encouraging the use of perceptual activities by teachers to aid in the development of the skills necessary for reading.

5.

The remedial classes set up by the reading specialist have been both pre and post tested using a variety of tests depending on the level of achievement by the students.

The tests used included:

a.

The Metropolitan Rea&ness Test Forms A and B.

b.

The Botel Reading Inventory, Forms A and B; 1961.

c.

Informal Reading Inventory.

-71-

d.

Geis ucGinitie P:14kaly F.auir.g Tests, Forms Al, A

B

2

1966.

The most 62-..cess-ul oulccmes brought about by the expanded component

were reported as: 1.

The enjoyment of learning to read exemplified by each pupil's enthusiasm in attacking his work and his eagerness to take books home to read.

2.

Change of attitude reflected in the pupil's emotional and personality development, and his general behavior.

9.

Provision of approval to bolster the student's self-confidence and improve his self-image.

4.

Improving word attack skills.

5.

Individualization of instruction as presented in the B.R.L. and McGraw Programmed Reading Matelials.

6.

Introduction of pre-reading programs in kindergartens in

effort to prevent reading disabilities. 7.

Dissemination of information to parents and teachers on the I.R.I.T.

8.

Assistance to new teachers and devices and materials prepared to help teachers.

9.

10.

Provision of tutoring help to E.S.L. pupils. Provision of remedial reading which directly influenced the reading ability of pupils.

11.

The love of learning to read exemplified by each pupil's enthusiasm in attacking his work, 'sticking' to it and his eagerness to take books home to read.

-72-

-, .

12.

Chance of attitude reflected in the pupil's emotional and personality development.

13.

Assistance to new teachers.

14.

Behavioral patterns and learning situations improved in the classroom.

15.

Improved reading achievement as shown in the test results.

16.

Assistance in the training and coordinating of the work of the para-professional to help teachers in the teaching of reading.

17.

This additional personnel made it possible to give added remedial reading and more consultant time to teachers.

18.

The use of the overhead projector and the language master provided motivation and improved the skills of word analysis.

17.

Getting same of the children up to their potential in reading.

18.

Success in the teaching of writing, letter formation, and letter recognition.

19.

Development of materials for use with the reluctant reader, vocabulary games and skill games which improved word attack skills.

20.

Development of tapes and worksheets for small group instruction and individualized instruction.

21.

Use of the controlled reader for the more mature youngster provided motivation.

22.

Conducting of In-Service Programs for teachers to introduce new to materials and techniques in reading - programmed materials assist in the individualization of instruction.

Problems encountered in iluDiementing the program were reported as follows: 1.

Each school had different needs which prevented a uniform approach for the Expanded Reading Services.

2.

Lack of understanding of the purpose to be served by a reading specialist.

3.

Lack of funds to supplement this component.

STAFF REOIREMINIS Because of shifts in funding coupled with the elimination of the reading clinic program it was possible to transfer additional personal to the expanded reading component.

These transfers which involved a total

of 8 additional positions, were added to the camponenes original staff of 6, thus bringing the program's aggregate to a total of 14.

These

SADC assignments, which were also expanded to cover an additional five are reported in the following table:

TABLE 20 SADC EXPANDED READING ASSIGNMENTS 1968-69

School

Assigned Personnel

AlTuoaal

1

Barbour Barnard-Brown Brackett Clark Hooker Kinsella Northwest-Jones Rawson Wish H.P.H.S. Weaver

1

.

1 1 1 1 1

1 1

2

-74-

EVALUATION Because cf the individualized nature of t'oe expanded reading

services, it was impractical to attempt a statistical analysis of group test data.

This would tend to be misleading.

Neither was it

possible to make camparisons between schools since test results were far from. beingLccapatable.

Consequently, the following figures have been

reported in an attempt to document, if not fully evaluate, the scope and sequence of the rendered services, and, while admittedly incomplete, these do represent the data which was presented. 1.

At Brackett Northeast, 54 second grade pupils received remedial reading assistance.

Of these, 6 were reported as reading at the

third grade level, and 18 at the second grade level at the end of the school year. 2.

Of the 19 children who finished out the reading program in June at Kinsella all but six were reading at the second grade level while the remaining thirteen children had been advanced to a grade 1.2 readi ng text.

Noticeably, all but one child was

reading at the pre -- primary level when the instruction began. 3.

The Hooker specialist reported that 17 second graders and 15 first graders were serviced.

Of these, 14 were reported as reading

at a 1.1 text level. 4.

At Barnard-Brown, 11 second grade children had reached the first or pre-primary levels by December, 1968.

No final figures for

the year were reported. 5.

The Arsenal reading teacher reported that 90 second graders received services during the 1968-69 year.

Of these, 9 moved,

1 was dropped from the program for poor attention, and 1 was

dropped for lack of motivation.

The levels of achievement

reported were generally pre-primary at the close of the year. 6.

At Northwest-Jones, 54 students were assisted, over varying lengths of time.

Here the general levels of reported achievement

ranged from PP to 1.8.

SUNMARY AND CONCLUSIONS While the very nature of reading const.ltation continues to preclude

the compilation and analysis of objectifiable 'lard" data relating to changes in children, it should be noted that the numbers of reported activities again indicate that a substantial number of services continue to be furnished to Hartford's validated schools.

Determining the specific

effects of these services will constitute an area of vital inquiry in the year to came.

INT5NSIVE READING INSTRUCTIONAL TEAMS (Hartford SADC Component 4)

Designed to capitalize on the beim:its of small group instiuction and motivation, and maximal numbers of adult contacts, three Intensive

Reading Instructional Teams, or IRIT's as they were commonly called, provided for over 250 youngsters a comprehensive program of intensive small -group reading instruction.

The IRIT program was designed to: 1.

Assist children in mastering the decoding process.

2.

Develop each child's ability to read and comprehend.

3.

Motivate the,child to read independently.

It was hypothecated that average group gains of approximately one year could be accumulated by children in both the decoding and comprehension areas f011owing the completion of an instructional cycle of approximately ten weeks duration.

DESCRIPTION

Located in three rented facilities, and.operating during the conduct of the academic year, the IRIT program continued to use a departmentalized structure as the format for teamed reading instruction.i

from teacher to teacher at hourly intervals each morning pupils were able to meet with teachers specializing in one of three crucial areas of reading.

These areas were: the decoding program, which included instruction in word analysis and word attack skills; the basal reading program, which stressed vocabularly and comprehension development; and the visual perceptio?.

program, which was designed to develop an enjoyment of reading and at the same time, lay the ground work for a future appreciation of literature. -76-

-77-

Areas were coordinated and the pupils received instruction in each area. At the end of the morning session, pupils returned to the sending schools to receive afternoon instruction in other basic subjects. Pupils were selected for the program on the basis of both teacher recommendations and Kindergarten Survey test

scores and, with one

exception, remained with an IRIT team for approximately ten weeks.

One

group, made up mainly of Non-English speakers was retained at a center

for two consonutive cycles because the level of language development was extremely deficient.

The conduct of the IRIT program involved the use of many instructional activities; these have been summarized by their primary area of impact as follows. 1.

The language development or basal reading area.

This area

concentrated on the development of oral communication and the Improvement of vocabulary concepts.

Skills in listening and

speaking were stressed together with the understanding that 'reading' was 'speech' written down.

Tape recordings and record

players using headsets were used extensively to develop good listening skills.

Favorite stories were listened to while

pupils followed the story in the book.

Telephone instruments

were used to stimulate conversation between children.

Special

tape lessons were prepared by the teacher on letter sounds with accompanying worksheets.

The use of the headsets was also used

to improve listening to follow directions. 2.

The decoding area.

Here, the Sullivan Materials were used as

they presented a code-emphasis method: i.e., one that emphasized letters, sounds and the blending of sounds into words.

The

-78-

words introcluced were regular ones, and this facilitated the skill of word analysis.

A variety of materials which stressed letters and sounds were used to reinforce the decoding core area.

The Merrill Linguistic

Readers, the S.R.A. Linguistic Readers and the Lippincott Readers were correlated with the Sullivan materials whenever possible. This articulation proved to be most beneficial in pulling all the words of one pattern together, thus making the use of this technique for unlocking words more meaningful to the children while at the same time providing for a multi- approach to beginning reading.

The need for a sight approach to reading

was met through the use of pictures, repetition and the use of

Language Masters to relate both visual and auditory stimuli. 3.

The visual perception area.

This area was focused on the training

of pupils to develop a comprehension of basic forms; to perceive size, shape, and lines both straight and curved; and to develop a good image of the body as an assist in the building of added perceptual skills.

Also included in this phase of the program

were materials and activities designed to focus on the development of handwriting skills and basic reading.

These included use of

the Frosting Program of Pictures and Patterns; physical activities

aimed at improving coordination, balance, flexibility and :rhythm; Montessori type materials; and the individualization of instruction which was accomplished through the use of self-selected and self-paced materials.

The improvement of the child's self-image was an integral part

-79-

of the total II= program.

Small and full length mirrors

gave the pupils an opportunity to see themselves, while each center provided a camera to photograph each child.

Pictures

taken were not only sent home, but were also used to provide a further basis for language stimulation. PARENT INVOLViMENT

To facilitate a home and school relationship, conferences were held with parents before the pupils entered the IRIT cycle.

In addition, an

open house was held for each cycle and here the parents weie given the opportunity to became familiar with each area of the program.

Parents

were also encouraged to visit the center weekly, and to take home materials to use with their children in support of the reading program.

A number of IRIT activities were reported by the coordinator as being particularly successful in helping children at the primary level.

"one

of .the more salutary of these activities included:

1..

A weekly newspaper was prepared by each center and this was distributed to the sending schools and to the pupil's homes.

Individual contributions of youngsters were featured,

as were follow-up school activities which were to be completed at home. 2.

The I.g.I.T. Open House continued to be an eapecially successful activity.

Most cycles were visited by at least 40% of the

parents who had pupils enrolled. 3.

Several booktets were published by the Centers. a.

Ann Street Center receivi,d two $25.00 awards from Behavioral

Research Laboratories for creative teaching techniques to implement the Sullivan Program.

b.

Emanuel Center p111,1c,ILed zn ABC boo.;:let, 'Rhyming Time 1

fran Ore to Ten', 'Christmastime Rhymes,

"The Short of

a,e,i,o,u,' and 'The Emanuel Readiness Test.' c.

Garden Street Center published Stores for Fun and Patterns.

4.

As indicated by parent and teacher evaluations, a positive attitude toward reading and school was developed.

5.

A definite improvement in the knowledge of letters and letter sounds as shown by the letter recognition tests.

6.

Increased skill in reading ability by most of the pupils and an improvement on readiness skills for others.

7.

P.M. subtest scores showed that sane of the children made considerable improvement in their ability to deal with spatial relations.

8.

Improvement in verbalization and self-expression was evident as demonstrated by the use of more descriptive terminology and more complex sentences.

9.

Serving as a demonstration center for teachers in Hartford, in the state and for reading supervisors from as far away as Guam.

10.

New language master games were developed which improved skill in visual and auditory discrimination.

11.

Recognition was given for daily successes, and pupils received a certificate at the end of the cycle during a special program with principals, teachers and parents present.

12.

Provision of juice and crackers pranoted a more positive and confidoxtt approach toward school.

13.

The fine cooperation from the reading consultants in the sending schools was an important factor in the success of the program.

Several problems were encountered in the operation of the project: 1.

Communication was difficult with the Non-English parents.

2.

A nead.for closer correlation of the IRIT Program with the regular school program to maintain the achieved gains as noted.

3.

The provision for released time for Hartford teachers to observe the IRIT was recommended.

4.

After school vandalism was a continuing problem at one center.

5.

Available tests do not accurately reflect the achievement or the potential of disadvantaged youngsters.

This is particularly

true at the first grade level.

EVALUATION Because it was felt that the usual measures of group teading achievement were inappropriate for disadvantaged youngsters at the primary grade level, several changes to the planned evaluation were introduced.

Instead of

using a pre and post test of reading achievement, it was hypothecated that the mastery of the IRIT- taught initial reading skills would constitute a valid measure of a child's acadam:I.c potential.

appropriate instruments

were indicated.

Consequently, other

To obtain a usable measures of

language-oriented ability while at the same time minimizing the pressures of testing, the instructional office decided to use the Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PPVT) as a baseline, and total score of the Primary Mental Abilities (PMA), 1962 Revision as an end-of-cycle measure.

.

-82-

The rationale icir tLe s-Aection of the cited instruments was a logical one.

The PPVT, which was administered as part of the city-wide

Kindergarten Survey, produced a vocabulary-oriented measure of mental

ability; this score was available for all kindergarters who had been in the Hartford schools during the 1968-69 year.

The PMA, when used as a group

reading test, also produced an assessment of language-oriented mental ability.

While the evaluative model, itself, began as a rudimentary one, several added modifications were introduced.

The reading department

questioned the advisability of using PMA as a measure of reading achievement and recammended the language portions of the Metropolitan Achievement Teets instead.

Consequently, the first cycle was tested with the PPVT-PMA;

the second with the PPVT and the PMA, used as both a pre and post measure; and the third with the pre and post PMA alone.

Next, questionnaires were given to all parents and to the sending teachers.

These were tallied by percentage of responses.

And finally,

typical parent and teacher comments were extracted. In Table 21 can be found comparative data for the first 1968-69 IRIT cycle.

Here, the PPVT, given in the winter of 1969, has been used as a

baseline and the PMA as a measure of end-of-cycle achievement.

TP BLE 21

COMPARISON OF IRIT MEAN READING GAINS, OCTOBER-DECEMBER 1968 CYCLE wirmwwwWW.M.

..4""

Center and Sex

October 1968 ----------7 Mean SD Range MA

Emanuel Boys

N

December 1969 PMA SD Mean Range MA

Diff. Signif.

mall

10

5.4

2.8-7.3

1.3

11

6.5

5.1-7.1

.9

1.1

2.3

11

4.3

2.7-5.6

.

7

6

6.5

6.2-6.8

.3

2.2

9.4

Boys

12

5.5

3.8-6.3

2.2

9

5.8

5.4-6.8

.6

.3

.4

Girls

11

4.7

3.1-6.6

.

9

9

6.0

5.0-6.8

.7

1.3

Boys'

13

4.3

3.5-5.1

.

7

15

5.5

4.8-6.1

1.7

1.3

2.7

Girls

10

4.9

3.1-6.1

.

9

11

5.7

5.8-7.4

1.2

.8

1.7

Girls

1

Ann Street

Garden Street

MWM.NM.M

MEM.

wi.Nsoommftwom

11.1ipmr

moalMwe

All figures have been rounded. Sending schools: Emanuel-Vine; Ann Street-Hooker; Garden Street -Wish.

While it should be noted that the statistic used for cavp.::N4

the

several groups was more appropriate to the treatment of larger populations, the comparisons indicated, that with the exception of the Ann St.Teet boys and

the Garden Street girls, substantial achievement gains were recorded at the end of the ten-week instructional cycle.

For the second cycle, as shown in Table 22, the data was similarly positive.

With this group the PMA was administered at the beginning and

end of the cycle.

with all groups

Note that here, too, the recorded gains were significant, achieving substantially.

While the PPVT-PMA comparisons

have not been graphically reported, gains produced were preaumed to be similia, in nature to those reported for the first cycle.

TABLE 22

CCMPARISON OF IRIT MEAN READING GINS, JANUARY - APRIL 1969 CYCLE January 1969

Center and Sex

N

PMA

Agril 1369 N

.

Mean Raw Score

Range

.

PMA

Mean

SD ..

Range

SD

Mean

Raw Score.

Diff.

Signif

---,---------Emanuel Boys Girls Carden St. Boys Girls

11

56.6

16-92

24.2

7

94.4

67-107

12.9

37.8

3.8

11

73.7

9-108,

27.2

15

101.1

56-129

18.3

27.4

3.1

15

47.7

33-61

9.3

12

58.6

48-69

7.2

10.9

3.3

18

49.8

34-67

11.8

15

58.0

48-71

7.0

8.2

2.4

.......1.....!1011EMO. All figures are rounded.

Sending schools: Emanuel-Vine; Ann Street-Brackett

Because of the late June data submission, it was impossible to process the third cycle test scores in time for an appropriate inclusion in this report.

Hopefully, this analysis will be accomplished, and

disseminated in the not to distant future.

The second phase of the evaluation involved a tabulation and analysis of 386 responses to an questionaire which was distributed to the parents of the present IRIT pupils.

By percentage, parents -responded to

the follow.:.mg questionnaire queries:

1.

2.

3.

Much

Same

Does your child enjoy attending the Reading Program?

32

2

0

Has your child talked to you about reading school?

25

8

1

Does your child prefer having three teachers instead of one?

24

5

3

No

Questions, and typical answers, to the remaining items on the questionnaire were:

4.

How has the leading pry.4ram affected your child's regular

school work?

She continues to improve in all school work.

He brings nice work from both his regular class and reading program. 5.

Has your child's attitude toward reading char)ed?

How?

His attitude has changed because when I visit him in his reading class the teacher didn't tell me anything about his attitude. I hope he minds each one of his teachers. 6.

Has your child's attitude toward school been affected? She is very interested in school.

7.

How?

She loves school.

Comments:

I think the Reading Program is helpful to the youngsters. It is improved very much.

While no attempt was made to develop a content analysis of the obtained parental responses, the cited comments were typical of those received,both by teaA and by cycle, and were, in the main, quite positive toward the services which were being rendered.

Comments on evaluation forms distributed to all sending teachers were similarly salutary, however, many were coupled with suggestions for improving the program.

Typical of the reactions to the questions received

from first grade teachers were the following: I.

Have you noticed changes in the readiness skills of the children attending the first grade IRIT? What? a.

Yes, recognition of letters, colors, some words, more verbal.

b.

In a couple of instances they recognized colors and some of the letters.

c.

Yes, in same of the children. Left to right progression, color names 'and words. Recognition of numberr.

2.

d.

Two children have learned all the letters in the alphabet. With the c::capiir,li of one boy, all can listen attentively, concentrate on a ..tsk for a period of time, follow directions and participate in many reading activities.

e.

Yes, the children get the ideas that are put across more easily without having to use the concrete materials first.

f.

No more than the other children in the class.

g.

In the majority of the children I noticed better recognition of the alphabet and shapes. But in the children who are very slow, I did not see any improvement.

h.

Knowledge of upper and lower case letters.

i.

Better visual and writing discrimination of sounds.

Have you noticed changes in the children's attitude toward reading?

What? a.

More interest in learning.

b.

Not really.

c.

No.

d.

There is a definite interest in books and reading.

e.

I don't know if it's a change or not, but they are anxious and enthusiastic about reading. Both appear to enjoy the reading group.

3.

g.

Yes, there is much greater interest in books, in general. Some children are beginning to recognize words in other places, such as on charts, in newspapers and magazines.

h.

It is difficult to say because of the short time they were in the class before going to IRIT. Also, the types of activities done in the afternoon did not show this.

i.

It is difficult to answer this question because I did not take reading as a separate subject in the afternoon when these children were in my room.

k.

Have not done reading as such with this group.

Have you noticed apparent charges in your pupil's attention span?

What? a.

Increased attention span -- more settled.

h.

In a few instances. They seemed a little bit more interested in what was going on in the classroom. 1

c.' A few pupils are able to listen for longer periods of time and can follow directions better.

4.

d.

The children can direct their attention to a specific learning situation for about 15 minutes.

e.

The children seem able to concentrate on an activity longer, and seem to follow directions better.

f.

No, those children that were matured, have maintained their maturity, while the youngsters with short attention spans have not improved any.

g.

Two of the children had long attention spans and still do, one still needs help.

h.

Some gained in alertness to situations. At, beginning of program children were very tired and found it difficult to concentrate.

Have you noticed apparent changes in behavior?

Please specify.

a.

Better school attitude, better attendance.

b.

When the pupils returned during the afternoon they demanded more attention then could be given. They are very talkative and active.

c.

No.

d.

Yes, children who usually behave well in the regular classroom seem to have created sane discipline problems at the center.

e.

Two seemed to calm down and try harder, but three others seemed to retain their foggy attitude about school work.

f.

Yes,

g.

Same find it difficult to adjust to larger group (32) and would like more individual attention and guidance. Children sent presented no behavioral problems.

seems a little calmer than before.

a

5.

Were you able to visit the IRIT Program to see it in action? 13 yes's were reported.

-88-

6.

Comments and Suggestions a.

The only problem I encountered was the child's adjustment from a more active learning environment in a group of 10 children to a more structured classroom with a group of More communication with the IRIT teachers. 30. Use of the reading materials.

b.

Of the nine children who attended this program, I feel that only three or four actually gained much from this I feel that this program should be presented program. to kindergarten children.

c.

I feel that some of the pupils spent too much time on readiness activities.

The Spanish-speaking pupils should be given an opportunity to take part in the program. d.

I think the program is fine and commend you for the work I only wish it were possible for the classroom to done. have some of the equipment you have.

e.

I felt the motor development area was very good for readiness. I think the materials, aids, games, etc. used were good.

f.

Children who attend the center should if possible be kept together when they return to the classroom. Then the program they followed at the center could be carried on more meaningfully.

g.

For the first grade children, I would have liked to have seen more active work in reading itself with a less intensive focus on readiness.

h.

Put the program on a kindergarten level.

i.

By removing these children for the whole morning, it became very difficult to make a schedule for the subject areas so that the IRIT children would not miss anything. In first grade, it is too much to remove same of these children for so long a time. The readiness they were receiving was great, but first grade is too late. I fear that same children might actually fall behind, whereas they might have made a go of it if left in the regular classroom. The choosing who goes is incomplete and it becomes a guessing game as to who needs it.

j.

Excellent readiness work - should be on kindergarten level for all students. Seems early in the year for first grade teachers to fully judge pupils most in need of this work.

-89Perhaps kind-.)rgartei teachers could make initial decisions and first grade ter.che,:o then evaluate needs.

SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS For the fourth consecutive year, three Intensive Reading Instructional

Teams continued to provide substantial numbers of disadvantaged youngsters with an intensive small group instructional approach to inner-city reading problems.

Same results of the program's on-going evaluation indicated

that during the 1968-69 school year: 1.

Significant mean reading gains were recorded by group, for the majority of the primary grade pupils who had been enrolled in the program.

These gains, which appeared greatest when the

Primary Mental Abilities was used as the instrument of choice,

were considered to be a valid indication of school ability by members of the reading team staffs. 2.

Parents continued to be pleased with the IRIT program and

generally reported that the instruction seemed to be helping their children. 3.

While teachers were generally favorable to the program, there was sane indication that neither an improvement in achievement nor

in adjustment was immediately evidenced by sane children upon their return to the regular reading program.

Because of the presently limited availability of data, coupled with the shortness of time during which the IRIT has serviced primary grade

pupils, it seems premature to attempt a judgement of the effects of the present program on regular classroom achievement.

Consequently, this area

of inquiry should constitute a priority for evaluation during the conduct of the 1969-70 school year to came.

BUSINESS SERVICES (SJDC Component 5)

OBJECTIVE As a supportive service, this component continued to provide the Hartford Public Schools with some of the essential personnel and expenses

which were necessary to carry out the administrative and logistical functions of purchasing, accounting, auditing, and payroll.

These services

were needed to properly continue the implementation of the various projects funded under both SADC and ESEA.

DESCRIPTION AND STAFF REQUIREMENTS

The following positions were allocated to the component during the 1968-69 project year: 1

Assistant to the Purchasing Officer

2

Secretaries

EVALUATION Inasmuch as this component represented a total supportive service to all SADC components, no differential evaluation was attempted.

ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE (Hartford SADC Component 6)

OBJECTIVES Operating under special funding for the fourth consecutive year,

Hartford's English as a Second Language, or ESL program, continued to furnish over 1500 non-English-speaking native and newly-adopted youngsters, with orientation, translation, and instructional services designed to bridge the gap between the child's school environment. Oriented towards the previous year's model which, provided newcomers with a functional grasp of the English language,

the program, during the

1968-69 school year, served an estimated six percent of

Hartford's total public school enrollment, and over 46 percent of the city's total Puerto Rican and foreign born population.

The objectives of the ESL program remained the same as in previous years. 1.

To provide non-English speaking students with oral and written English skills.

2.

To provide the teachers in the schools most impacted with nonEnglish speaking youth with the skills needed to teach these pupils effectively.

DESCRIPTION The total ESL program continued to be organized around two interThese approaches provided for:

related approaches to instruction. 1.

The operation of 21 ESL classes.

This teAching service, which

was offered to over 1000 public school youngsters, centered

around the development and use of many supplemental materials which were geared especially to the instructional needs of the ESL program.

-91-

-922.

The year-round operation of three ESL reception centers. Each center continued to be staffed by a team leader, two experienced teachers, and a bilingual aide and were again located at the Barnard-Brown Elementary School (68 percent Puerto Rican), the Kinsella Elementary School (50 percent Puerto Rican) and the Hartford Public High School.

This

latter facility was used to provide a centralized instructional area for the city's total secondary school-aged population,

The actual assignment of the ESL staff continued to follow a format which had been established over previous years.

Note that the

increases which are reported in Table 23, are due to the tTansfer of paxsbnnel fram regular to special-funding.

TABLE 23 ESL TEACHING ALSP.[GNMETTTS, 1967-68 TO 1968-69

Number of Teachers

School

Attendance Area

1967-681 N=11

1967-68 N=10

2

1968-69 N=21

Arsenal

1

-

1

Barnazd-Brown

2

2

4

3/5

-

3/5

1

1

2

Dwight

2/5

-

2/5

Fox

3/5

-

3/5

Kinsella

1

2

3

New Park

2/5

-

2/5

Northwest

-

1/5

1/5

Vine

-

3/5

3/5

West Middle

-

1/5

1/5

HPHS

4

4

8

Brackett Burns

3

/Board of Education funding. 2ESEA funding.

3SADC funding.

Reception center operations also continued to emulate the patterns which had been established in previous years.

Consequently, attention

was focused on the conduct of the orientation program, which was used both to intensify language instruction for the beginner in English and to provide an intensive and knowledgeable assessment of the pupil's achievement and intellectual level.

This latter facet provided the basis

for gearing instructional materials and an accurate grade level placement to the child's operational level.

In addition to the general levels of

instruction, the center provided a number of other, and equally important, services.

Among those repotted were:

-93-

-94-

1.

Providing each child and his family with a point of contact between the school and the total community.

This contact was

frequently initiated by activities which evolved the grade placement of a child in terms of his age and past educational experiences, and this contact often branched out to include the translation of school records and other documents; possible referrals to social, employment, and housing agencies; and the development of a program of positive cooperation between the school and the family. 2.

Introducing each child to a functional command of the English language.

This introduction not only provided a basis for the

child's subsequent placement in a regular class, but also served to provide him with an easy entry into his new Englishoriented school environment. 3.

Supporting continuous development of the child's English language facility.

This was accomplished by providing within

each center, facilitaties for the preparation and distribution of special instructional materials.

These materials, coupled

with methodological assistance and consultation in the teaching of English to the non-native speaker, were frequently furnished

to other staff members by the reception center personnel. Of the activities documented, some were considered to be especially

successful; these were reported by the coordinator as follows: 1.

Due to component efforts, every new arrival in grades 2-12 who needed ESL instruction was assisted to some extent during the past year.

-952.

Sane students received up to fifteen hours a week of ESL instruct ion.

3.

It was possible to hire more adequately trained teachers.

4.

Through the use of more and better constructed materials it was possible to produce a greater increase in language growth.

5.

By placing more emphasis on linguistic reading with upgraded primary pupils in one school, Barnard-Brown, it was possible

to prevent same of the anticipated failures in reading this year. 6.

A better understanding of Puerto Rican children and their problems has been a significant outcome of ESL involvement in in-service training, the Puerto Rican community, Spanish Action

Groups, and the emphasis of Puerto Rican culture in the classroom. 7.

Due to the planning of special programs and activities for students and their parents, it was possible to establish a better rapport between teachers, students and parents.

8.

At Barnard-Brown parent cammittees have been formed to meet with teachers and other personnel to formulate positive action to improve attendance.

9.

Closer cooperation between local institutions of higher learning and the ESL department has brought about many changes and improvements in student teacher training.

SISCIANAIAMPREUIREMENTS The staff requirements for the component were substantially increased by transfer for the 1968-69 school year.

Filled positions included:

-961.

One ESL coordinator.

2.

Twenty -one ESL teachers.

All but one of these positions .r

remained filled throughout the year. 3.

Six full-time bilingual aides.

PROBLEM AREAS Several problem areas were reported. 1.

Lack of adequate classroom space.

2.

Lack of an adequate number of teachers to service kindergarten. and first grade pupils in most cases.

3.

Lack of space and staff to continue a second year program for most ESL students.

4.

Lack of facilities at the secondary level to adequately service about 300 students.

5.

Lack of funds for Bilingual Education.

6.

Lack of adequate training for classroom teachers having a large number of non-English speaking students in their home roans.

7.

Lack of sufficient time and funds to develop a curriculum for ESL and to individualize instruction to a greater extent.

8.

Poor attendance due in part to problems in scheduling of classes to avoid conflicts with other teachers of special subjects.

However, a more serious problem and reason for

poor attendance is due to the fact that there is an increasing number of health problems including lack of clothing, lack of food, and poor housing conditions. 9.

Due to the lack

of education and motivation

on the part of many

-97parents, the students do not have the initiative and lack the help from their families which is necessary for success in school. 10.

Mobility is a never ending, ever increasing hindrance to continued instruction in ESL or any other subject.

The

rate of mobility is high in and out of the city, to and from Puerto Rico and between schools in the city. 11.

Lack of bilingual staff such as guidance counselors, social workers and health personnel.

12.

Lack of a good health program for non-English speaking students and their parents.

The increase in the uses of drugs among the

Puerto Rican students indicates a need for an educational program for parents to alert them to these dangers.

EVALUATION While no specific test data was presented for analysis, the coordinator reported the following: 1.

Locally-constructed ESL tests were piloted during the 1968 69 school year.

These tests, which involved tapes containing

spoken stimuli, were used for initial class placement and for academic assessment.

Tentative findings indicated that the

measured leveic of comprehension generally exceeded those determined by the assessing ESL teachers. 2.

A second locally-constructed ESL test, which involved the use of pictures to elicit single sentence responses, was also piloted.

Here again the initial result; while salutary, continued to point out that the production of speech was more difficult

-98-

than the task of following directions.

Quantitative test

results were not reported. 3.

Locally constructed picture tests were used to assess vocabulary and comprehension.

This was necessary since many of the students

were not literate in their mother tongue and, therefore, testing with verbal instruments was practically impossible.

In many

cases, resultant comprehension test scores were found to be

higher than vocabulary scores, since the students had learned their vocabulary through context, rather than by rote memory. 4.

Gates Reading Readiness Tests were administered to a control group and to one ESL group. October and again in May.

Tests were administered in Test results indicated that the

students who attended the ESL classes were able to raise their average mean raw scores from 8 to 18, and their median percentile scores from 21 to 65.

The number of student

scores, when compared to national norms,

produced changes from 2 (below 25%) to 0; from 7 (26 to 50%) to 1; from 1 (51 to 75 %) to 5; and from 0 (above 761) to 4.

Students attending no ESL classes, but receiving instruction in English in a regular classroom, raised their average mean raw score

12 to 21, and their median percentile scores

from 47 to 66. 5.

At the high school level, a locally constructed test of English Comprehension was administered.

The median percent score at the

end of the first semester wat,':#3, and in June had risen to 70.

-99-

The greatest change came at the 80 to 89 percent score interval. In February, 15 students were within this range while 41

had reached this range in June.

The number of students scoring

according to national norms changed from 6 (26-50) to 1; from 4 (51-75) to 7; and from 0 (76 above) to 2.

In comparison, the ESL students gained one more point on the

average mean raw scores than did the control group.

Average median

percentile scores for ESL students increased by 34.

Control group

increases were 19.

The change in the number of students scoring according to national

norms was reported as: ESL - Below 25 (4); 26-50 (6); 51-75 (8); and above 76 (2).

Control Group - Below 25 (0); 26-50 (5); 51-75 (3); and above 76 (2). 6.

The ",omi.lan Reading Readiness Test was given to 32 ungraded primary ESL students at Barnard-Brown both in October and again

in Ky. The ESL students were able to raise their mean raw scores from an average of 35 to 42, and their median percentile scores from 38 to 52.

The number of students scoring according

to national norms changed from 7 (below 25) to 3; from 16

(26-50) to 10; from 9 (51-75) to 17; and from 7 (above 76) to 2.

SUMMUYAND CONCLUSIONS For the fourth consecutive year, an expanded English as a Second

Language component continued to provide over 1500 Puerto Rican and foreign-born youngsters with programs of intensive instruction in the functional uses of the English language.

The component included the

employment of 21 ESL teachers, the year-round operation of three

-100-

reception centers, and a program of on-going assistance for teachers in ESL techniques and methodology.

While investigations into measured pupil growth continued to be hampered by a lack of instruments which were suitable for testing Hartford's non-English speaking population, investigations with several locally-constructed instruments produced some evidence that changes in

both vocabulary and canprehension were being produced by the program. During the coming year, added attempts will be made to further test

and pilot local developed test and instruments, it is hoped that these dikAr,

will produce further evidences of pupil growth in the not too distant future.

COORDINATORS OF INSTRUCTIONAL IMPROVEMENT ;Hartford SADC Component 7)

OBJECTIVE AND DESCRIPTION Designed to assist in the facilatating the improvement of instruction, this component provided funds for the employment of two instructional coordinators, one of which was assigned at the elementary level, and the other to the intermediate, or middle-school grades.

Though the staffing of both of these positions for the first

time in 1968-69, it was now possible to provide more direct supervision to teachers in the validated schools than was previously available.

Consequently, the coordinators provided varying types of on-site teaching assistance.

This included the training and orientation of new teachers,

the observation and evaluation of instruction, the supervision of in-service and pre-service training programs, recruitment, and the facilitation of added school-community involvement.

EVALUATION Because of the supportive nature of this component, no differential evaluation was attempted.

PROJECT CONCERN

and PROJECT READ

will be reported in subsequent publications. Statistical summary sheets are contained in the appendix.

APPENDIX Summary Evaluation of P.A. 35 Programs for Fiscal Year 1969

-1041

EVI,LUATICN OF PA 35 (SAD;) AND TITLE I (ESEA) PROGRAMS

FOR FISCAL YES 1969

(1) Source of Program Funds: ( ) Titlo I (x) PA 35 ( ) Jointly Funded Title I and PA 35

Program Directorg200144.Constantine Program Evaluator Robert Nearine Date Evaluation was submitted 6/17/69

(2) Period of Project; X) School year project only ( ) Summer project only ( ) School year and summer project

Descriptive Title of Program: 4

op

0

SADC Amount Approved $

80645.

0=11111

Title I Amount Approved $ Name(s) of public schools where children re.ceived the services Project No. 64-1. Hartford Component la. of the program:Arsenal Elementary, Barnard-Brown elem.,Northwest-Jones H ar tford elem., Hartford High & Weaver High, Secondary T o wn List the number of staff members of the following classification whose total or partial salaries are included in the program budget: (

) teacher

(

) aide

(

) administrator

( 7

) special service cwunselor, psychological examiner, speech therapist, social worker, or medical)

(

) unpaid volunteers

(5) Give an unduplicated count of public school children directly served by this program.

2218

(6) Give the unduplicated count of public school children served by grade level.

12reK

--

K

1

134

160

2

166

4

3

128

112

5 i

283

6

278

7

176

8

--

9

258

I

(7) a.

b.

10

11

145

300

Indicate the hours per week of direct services to children or youth.

IndicatA the duration in weeks of project activities for youth.

12

Other.

4

78

i

L

--

35+

37

(8) List below the criteria used to select children for services of the program being evaluated (ec:(Jnomic cr3tpr3a and educational criteria) 1. All students receiving special services had to be in validated schools. 2. Generally, students come from families whose income was below the poverty level for the Hartford area. 3. Most students receiving services are educationally disadvantaged in terms of language barriers, cultural differences,reading levels and achievement test scores.

SUPPORTIVE SERVICES - SEE NARRATIVE

-1051.

EVALUATION OF PA 35 (SADC) AND TITLE I (FSEA) PROGRAMS FOR FISCAL YEAR 1969

(1) Source of Program Funds: ( ) Title 1

Program Director,

00 PA 35 (

F.W.Looney

Program Evaluator Robert J. Nearine

) Jointly Funded Title I and PA 35

Date Evaluation was submitted 7 1 69

(2) Period of Project: 00 School year project only ( ) Summer project only ( ) School year and summer project

Descriptive Title of Program:

School Social Workers

SADC Amount Approved $

(3) Name(s) of public schools where children received the services of the program:

85,900

Title I Amount Approved $ Project N0,64-1; Hartford Component lb.

See table 4.

Town

Hartford

(4) List the number of staff members of the following classification whose total or partial salaries are included in the program budget: ) teacher

( 12) spedial service (counselor,

psychological examiner, speech therapist, social worker, or medioal)

) aide.

) administrator (

) unpaid volunteers

(5) Give an unduplicated count of public school children directly served by this program.

1492

(6) Give the unduplicated count of public school children served by grade level. Month of April 1969 only used as basis for estimate. PreK

4

K 11

1 214

2 23

3

33

4

5 ,

29

6

7 32

8 19

9

23

10 lb

11 6

her

14

11

;

(7) a.

b.

Indicate the hours per week of direct services to children or youth. 1 hr. per week per child

Indicate the duration in weeks of project activities for youth.

(8) List below the criteria used to select children for services of the program being evaluated (economic criteria and educational criteria)

SUPPORTIVE SERVICES - SEE NARRATIVE

-1061.

EVALUATION OF PA 35 (SADC) AND TITLE I (ESEA) PROGRAMS FOR FISCAL YEAR 1969

(1) Source of Program Funds: ( ) Title I OC) PA 35 ( ) Jointly Funded Title I and PA 35

Program Directo4 A.L. Gillette 'Program Evaluator Robert J. Nearine

Date Evaluation was submitted 72 69

(2) Period of Project: OC) School year project only ( ) Summer project only ( ) School year and summer project

Descriptive Title of Program:

Psychological Services

SADC Amount Approved $ 50,400.

.

(3) Name(s) of public schools where children received the services of the program: Arsenal, Barbour,

Title I Amount Approved $ Project No.64-1; Hartford Camponent lc.

Barnard - Brown, Brackett, Hooker,

Kinsella, Northwest- Jones,Vine.

Town Hartford

(4) List the number of staff members of the following classification whose total or partial salaries are included in the program budget: ( ) teacher ( 5 special service (counselor, ( (

) aide,

20tElaLSELSELREE, speech therapist, social worker, or medioal)

) administrator

(

) unpaid volunteers

(5) Give an unduplicated count of public school children directly served by this program.

369

(6) Give the unduplicated count of public school children served by grade level.

PreK

K

1

2

3

16

63

54

41

(?) a.

b. 0

4 31

:

5

6

7

8

9

27

17

11

7

38

10 25

11

12

her

10

15

14'

Indicate the hours per week of direct services to children or youth. Indicate the duration in weeks of project activities for youth.

38

(8) List below the criteria used to select children for services of the program being evaluated (economic criteria and educational criteria) Classroan teachers and other school personnel refer a child for an individu0l psychological evaluation when he presents learning problems or adjustment difficUlties.

SUPPORTIVE SERVICES - SEE NARRATIVE

-1071.

EVALUATION OF PA 35 (SADC) AND TITLE I (ESEA) PROGRAMS FOR FISCAL YEAR 1969

(1) Source of Program Funds: ( ) Title I (x) PA 35 ( ) Jointly Funded Title I and PA 35

Margaret F. Kennedy

Program Director

Program Evaluator Margaret F. Kennet' Date Evaluation was submitted June 25, 1969

(2) Period of Project: (x) School year project only ( ) Summer project only ( ) Scheinl year and summer project

Descriptive Title of Program:

Speech and Hearing

SADC Amount Approved $65935040

(3) Name(s) of public schools where children received the services of the program: Brackett -$.E.

Arsenal West Middle Burns ftrthwest-Jon es Hooker Barnard-Brown Wish

I Amount Approved $ Project No. 64-1; Hartford Camponent 1 d.

H.P.H.S.

Town Hartford

(4) List the number of staff members of the following classification whose total or partial salaries are included in the program budget: (

) teacher

(

) aide.

(

) administrator

( 7 ) special service (counselor, psychological examiner, speech therapist, social worker, or medical) (

) unpaid volunteers

(5) Give an unduplicated count of public school children directly served by this program.

421

(6) Give the unduplicated count of public school children served by grade level.

PreK

0

K

1

11

55

(7) a.

b.

2

109

3

56

4

48

6

5

:

37

I

38

7

8

8

9

9.-

18

10

11

12

4

3

3.2Zl

Indicate the hours per week of direct services to children or youth.

Indicate the duration in weeks of project activities for youth.

rOther

25

36

(8) List below the criteria used to select children for services of the program being evalqated (ecczkomic criterla and educational criteria) A handicipping speech, language and/or hearing problem.

SUPPORTIVE SERVICES - SEE NARRATIVE

-1081.

EVALUATION OF PA 35 (SAD O) AND TITLE I (FSEA) PROGRAM

FOR FISCAL MAR 1969

(1) Source of Program Funds: ( ) Title I QC) PA 35 ) Jointly Funded Title I ( and PA 35

Program Director Helen D. Conley Program Evaluator Robert J. Nearine

Date Evaluation was submitted 6/25/69 Descriptive Title of Program;

(2) Period of Project; QC) School year project only ) Summer project only ( ( ) School year and summer project

Health Services SADC Amount Approved $18,600.

Title I Amount Approved $ (3) Name(s) of public schools where Project No.64-1. Hartford Component le. children rAceived the services of the program: Brackett,Clark, West Middle,Barnard-Brown,HPBS & Town Bart fjprri Annex,Fox,Burns,Kinsella,Wish (4) List the number of staff members of the following classification whose total or partial salaries are included in the program budget: (

) teacher

(

) aide

(

) administrator

(

(

2) special service (cwunselor, psychological examiner, speech therapist, social worker, or medioal) ) unpaid volunteers

(5) Give an unduplicated count of public school children directly served by this program.

9297

(6) Give the unduplicated count of public school children served by grade level. ..,...._

PreK

10

11

12

.

10ther,

E297 1

;

,

(7) a.

b.

Indicate the hours per week of direct services to children or youth. Indicate the duration in weeks of project activ!.ties for youth.

35 40

(8) Last below the criteria used to select children for services of the program being evalnated (ec(Alomic er3teria And oducatio%al criteria: All served medically in the validated schools. SUPPORTIVE SERVICES - SEE NARRATIVE

-1CQ1.

EVALUATION OF PA 35 (SADC) AND TITLE I (FSEA) PROGRAAS FOR FISCAL YEAR 1969

(1) Source of Program Funds: ( ) Title I (X) PA 35 ( ) Jointly Funded Title I and PA 35

Program Directoz Henry Luccock Program EvaluatorRobert J. Nearine

Date Evaluation was submitted 9/30/68 Descriptive Title of Program:

(2) Period of Project:. ( ) School year project only (X) Summer prGject only ( ) School year and summer project

Experimental Pro rams-Summer Curriculum

SADCAmount Approved $

81750.

Title I Amount Approved $ (3) Name(s) of public schools where children received the,services of the program:

Project No. 6L. -2 (FY 69)

Not applicable.

Town Hartford

(4) List the number of staff members of the following classification whose total or partial salaries are included in the program budget: ( 21) teacher '(

(

) special service (counselor, psychological examiner, speech therapist, social worker, or medical)

(

) unpaid volunteers

) aide.

( 1 ) administrator

(5) Give an unduplicated count of public school children directly served by this program.

N/A

(6) Give the unduplicated count of public school children served by grade level. $

1

PreK

10

11

12

Other'

i

(7) a.

b.

1

Indicate the hours per week of direct services to children or youth.

N/A

Indicate the duration in weeks of project activities for youth.

N/A

(8) list below the criteria used to select children for services of the program being evaluated (economic criteria and educational criteria) NOT APPLICABLE - CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM.--DATA CONTAINED ON THIS FORM 4AS REPORTED SIOTEMBER 30, 1968.

-1101.

EVALUATION OF PA 35 (SADC) AND TITLE I (FSEA) PROGRAMS FOR FISCAL YEAR 1969

(1) Source of Program Funds: ( ) Title I

Program Directo4 M. W. White

(x) PA 35. (

Program EvaluatorRobeit J. Nearine

) Jointly Funded Title I and PA 35

Date Evaluation was submitted 7/1/69

(2) Period of Project: (x) School year project only ( ) Summer project only ( ) School year and summer project

Descriptive Title of Program: Higher Horizons 100

SADC Amount Approved $ 72,330.

(3) Name(s) of public schools were children received the services of the program: Hartford Public High School

Title I Amount Approved $ Project No.64-1; Hartford Component 2a.

Town Hartford (4) List the number of staff members of the following classification whose total or partial salaries are included in the program budget: (

6

) teacher

(

1

) aide.

(1

) special service (csounsglor, psychological examiner, speech therapist, social worker, or medioal)

(

) unpaid volunteers

) administrator

(5) Give an unduplicated count of public school children directly served by this program.

97

(6) Give the unduplicated count of public school children served by grade level.

PreK

K

1

(7) a.

b. 0

2

3

5

6

7

8

9

10

Indicate the hours per week of direct services to children or youth. Indicate the duration in weeks of project activities for youth.

11

12

guwJ7: .........

35

40

(8) List below the criteria used to select children for serv!,:es of the program being evaluated (economic criteria and educational criteria) Average rated or tested ability; reading level 1 to 3 years below grade level; emotional stability; not over age for grade by more than one year; approval of the sending school counselor.

2.

9a.

If children from eligible Title I attendance areas attended nonpublic schools, met the criteria to receive services, and received services of the townts Title I ESEA program - -indicate the number of such children and the names of the nonpublic schools from which they came. Not applicable.

9b.

Describe the specific services these children received. See pages 50-52.

9c.

If the Title I services for nonpublic school children were different from the services provided for public school children, indicate the value of such services on a separate page and attach to this report.

Consult the Connecticut School Register for the statistics to .e provided for questions 10,11, and 12 below. 10a.

b.

lla.

b.

12a.

b.

13.

List the number of children and youth directly served by the project who were promoted to the next grade level at the end of school year 1948-69. List the number of children and youth directly served by the project who were not promoted to the next grade level at the end of school year 1968-69. Give the aggregate days of attendance of children and youth directly served 'oy the pioject. (Consult the ANNUAL SUMMARY; Number of Days in Attendance in the Connecticut School Register)

14726

Give the aggregate days of membership of children and youth directly served by the project. (Consult the ANNUAL SUMMARY, Number of Days in Membership in the Connecticut School Register)

16289

List the number of grade 7-12 youth served by the project who withdrew from school from July 1, 1968 to June 30, 1969. (Consult the MONTHLY SUMMARIES and give the sum total of Dl, D6, D11, and D17) List the number of grade 7-12 youth served by the project who remained in school from July 1, 1968 to June 30, 1969. (Subtract the number of grade 7-12 withdrawals fram the total number of grade 7 through 12 public school youth served in the program) Report the standardized test results secured for children in the program in TABLE I on the following page. See Tables 12a - 18, pages 54 - 63.

4

93

setting.

a regular hiq

compensatory program of cultural activities.

4.-_o provide a

3.To raise the level of academic aspiration and achievement.

language P..rts.

4.

EVALUATIVE INSTRUMENT or technique designated to measure growth toward the objective, including: when used, with whom, by whom constructed, and other pertinent data 1. See pages 53-66.

2.To provide re- 2. Intensive counseling. mediation, par- 3. Articulated cultural activities; ticularly in the

school prograri.

self-contained, mall group

to adjust to

1.Pissist students 1. Intensive instruction in a

OUTCOME

Major Project ACTIVITIES and Services: A running narrative of the project description

See pages 53-66. Interpretations are shown with the several parts of the investigation.

State the FINDINGS from the data given

Give the evaluator's INTERPRETATION of the FINDINGS for each objective. The INTERPRETATION should follow the last FINDING for a given objective and occupy the spaCe of two or more columns. If additional pages are used in reporting objective evaluation, continue the use of 8x11 paper in "chart form" as arranged on this first page.

Eva'-ation of Objectives: Use the following chart form in restating and evaluating the objectives directly related to changes expected of children and youth receiving project services. As important as other objectives might be that have been set by the town, report only the effect of project services on the children selected for the project.

OBJECTIVE or LEARNING

14.

-113-

5.

15.

Aside from the evaluation made of program objectives, indicate arxy successful outcomes resulting from Title I or PA 35 efforts in the town during the past year. Perhaps the most successful outcome which has developed from the HH 100 program is the knowledge that youngsters at the high school_level can be identified and helped substantially to modify their academic futures. This finding is in sharp contrast to the usual contention that only early childhood, or primary grade programs, are suitable arenas- for compensatory education.

16.

Aside from the evaluation made of program objectives, indicate any problems resulting from Title I efforts in the town during the past year. 1. The program of field trips and cultural activities was sharply curtailed because of a limitation of available funds. 2. Planning efforts, usually conducted during the summer vacation period, were similiarly reduced. Only the team leader and the counselor could be funded for even a short planning period.

-1141.

EVALUATION OF PA 35 (SADC) AND TITLE I (FSEA) PROGRAMS FOR FISCAL YEAR 1969

(1) Source of Program Funds: ( ) Title I

Program Director,

() PA 35 (

Program Evaluator Robert J. Nearine

) Jointly Funded Title I and PA 35

Date Evaluation was submitted X20/69

(2) Period of Project: 00 School year project only ( ) Summer project only ( ) School year and summer project

Descriptive Title of Program: Expanded Reading Program and Intensive Readina Instructional Teams

SADC Amount Approved $ 301,688.

(3) Name(s) of public schools where children received the services of the program:

Title I Amount Approved $ Project No.64.-1; Hartford Component 4.

Arsenal, Brackett, Barbour, BarnardBrown, Hooker, Ki nsella, Northwest-Jones,Vine ( 4 )

M. Beatrice Wood

Town

Hartford

List the number of staff members of the following classification whose total or partial salaries are included in the program budget: (

26)

(

3

(

1) administrator

teacher

special service (counselor, psychological examiner, speech therapist, social worker, or medical)

) aide'

unpaid volunteers

(5) Give an unduplicated count of public school children directly served by this program.

716

(6) Give the unduplicated count of public school children served by grade level.

PreK

K

1

354

(7) a.

b.

2

312

3 13

4

5

6

8

21

2

7

8

9

10

11

'Other

6

Indicate the hours per week of direct services to children or youth.

35

Indicate the duration in weeks of project activities for youth.

(8) List below the criteria used to select children for services of the program being evaluated (economic criteria and educational criteria) Reading disability.

-1152.

9a.

If children from eligible Title I attendance areas attended nonpublic schools, met the criteria to receive services, and received services of the town's Title I ESEA program - -indicate the number of such children and the names of the nonpublic schools from which they came. Not appliotable.

9b.

Describe the .specific services these children received. See pages 69-72 and 75 -79.

9c.

If the Title I services for nonpublic school children were different from the services provided for public school children, indicate the value of such services on a separate page and attach to this report.

Consult the Connecticut School Register for the statistics to be provided for questions 10,11, and 12 below. 10a.

b.

lla.

b.

12a.

b.

13.

List the number of children and youth directly served by the pi-oject who were promoted to the next grade level at the end of school year 1968-69.

N/A

List the number of children and youth directly served by the project who were not promoted to the next grade level at the end of school year 1968-69.

N/A

Give the aggregate days of attendance of children and youth directly served 'ay the project. (Consult the ANNUAL SUMMARY; Number of Days in Attendance in the Connecticut School Register)

27380

Give the aggregate days of membership of children and youth directly served by the project. (Consult the ANNUAL SUMMARY, Number of Days in Membership in the Connecticut School Register)

34003

List the number of grade 7-12 youth served by the project who withdrew from school from July 1, 108 to June 30, 1969. (Consult the MONTHLY SUMMARIES and give the sum total of D1, D6, D11, and D17)

N/A

List the number of grade 7-12 youth served by the project who remained in school from July 1, 1968 to June 30, 1969. (Subtract the number of grade 7-12 withdrawals from the total number of grade 7 through 12 public school youth served in the program) NiA Report the standardized test results secured for children in the program in TABLE I on the following page. See Tables 21 and 22, pages 83 and 84.

1.

EVALUATIVE INSTRUMENT or technique designated to measure growth toward the objective, including: when used, with whom, by whom constructed, and other pertinent data

State the FINDINGS from the data given

1

4.

Continue the expanded reading 1. Analysis of reported activities., 1.See pages 69-90. program. 2. The Metropolitan Readiness Tests!, cess. 2. Continue the intensive, Forms A & B. 2.Development 04 team-oriented program of 3. Gates McGinitie Primary ReadiL.;, the ability to small-group instruction (IRIT ). Tests, Forms A & B, Levels 1 & 2. read and comp4. Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test. rehend. 5. Primary Mental Abilities. 3.Stimulate inde6. Teacher and Parent questionnaires. pendent reading.

1.Mastery of thq decoding pro-,

Major Project ACTIVITIES and Services: A running narrative of the project description

Give the evaluator's INTERPRETATION of the FINDINGS for each objective. The INTERPRETATION should follow the last FINDING for a given objective and occupy the space of two or more columns. If additional pages are used in reporting objective evaluation, continue the use of 8ix11 paper in "chart form" as arranged on this first page.

Evaluation of Objectives: Use the following chart form in restating and evaluating the objectives dire zdy related to chAnges expected of children and youth receiving project services. As important as other objectives might be that have been set by the town, report only the effect of project services on the children selected for the project.

'OBJECTIVE or 'LEARNING OUTCOME

14.

5.

15.

Aside from the evaluation made of program objectives, indicate any successful outcomes resulting from Title I or PA 35 efforts in the town during the past year See pages 71-72, and pages 79-81.

16.

Aside from the evaluation made of program objectives, indicate any problems resulting from Title I efforts in the town during the past year. See pages 72 and 81.

-1181.

EVALUATION OF PA 35 (SADC) AND TITLE I (FSEA) PROGRAMS FOR FISCAL YEAR 1969

(1) Source of Program Funds: ( ) Title I (

P. R. Blackey

Program Director,

) PA 35

Program Evaluator Robert J. Nearine

) Jointly Funded Title I and PA 35

Date Evaluation was submitted 7/1/69

(2) Period of Project: ( ) School year project only ( ) Summer project only (x) School year and summer project

Descriptive Title of Program:

Business Services 25,500.

SADC Amount Approved $

Title I Amount Approved $

(3) Name(s) of public schools where children received the services of the program:

Project No. 64 -1

Not applicable.

Hartford Component 4.

Town HArtfnrd

(4) List the number of staff members of the following classification whose total or partial salaries are included in the program budget: (

) teacher

(

) aide,

(

) administrator

(

) special service (cwunselor, psychological examiner, speech therapist, social worker, or medioal)

(

) unpaid volunteers

(5) Give an unduplicated count of public school children directly served by this program.

N A

(6) Give the unduplicated count of public school children served by grade level. ,

-

PreK

K

1

i

2

3

4

5

6

4---..-

-,

7

8

9_

10

11

12

Other

,

;'

4

(7) a.

b.

.--!--1- --....i

Indicate the hours per week of direct services to children or youth.

N/A

Indicate the duration in weeks of project activities for youth.

N/A

(8) List below the criteria used to select children for services of the program being evaluated (economic criteria and educational criteria) Not applicable.

SUPPORTIVE SERVICES - SEE NARRATIVE

1. EVALUATION OF PA 35 (SADC) AND TITLE I (ESEA) PROGRAMS FOR FISCAL YEAR 1969

(1) Source of Program Funds: ( ) Title I (X) FA 35 ( ) Jointly Funded Title I and PA 35

Program Director Lois B. Magietto Program Evaluator Robert J. Nearine Date Evaluation was submitted June 15, 1969

(2) Period of Project, ( ) School year project only ( ) Summer project only (X) School year and summer project

Descriptive Title of Program:

SADC Amount Approved $ 271,3-30.00

Titlo I Amount Approved $ (3) Name(s) of public schools where children received the services of the program: See attached

Project No. 64:-2 ;Hartford Component 6.

Town

Jiartforj

(4) List the number of staff members of the following classification whose total or partial salaries are included in the program budget: ( 21) teacher

(

) special service (counselor, psychological examiner, speech therapist, social worker, or medical)

(

) unpaid volunteers

( 10) aide (

1 ) administrator

(5) Give an unduplicated count of public school children directly served by this program.

lilt

1588

(6) Give the unduplicated count of public school children served by grade level.

PreK i

K

1

51

244

1

2

3

188

164

4

5

6

147

139

148

7

105

8

9

10

11

12

Other

352

43

i

!

(7)

b.

0

7

Indicate the hours per week of direct services to children or youth.

5 of instruction per student 30 of service

Indicate the duration in weeks of project activities for youth.

52

(8) Ast below the criteria used to select children for services of the program being evhbate-t (ecc,Lomic criteria and educational criteria) A. Economic B. Educational 1. Poverty Area Youth 1. New arrivals a. Welfare a. Little or no English b. Model City b. Illiterates c. Disadvantaged c. All grade levels d. Migratory d. Ages 5 - 18 e. Validated schools Various language backgrounds .

(3) Names of public schools (*Centers) where children received the

services of the program:

*Barnard-Brown *Kinsella

*H P.

S.

*New Park *Fox *Burns *Vine *Northwest-Jones

*West Middle *Dwight Naylor *Brackett-Northeast Burr Wish *Arsenal Batchelder

*Moylan-McDonough Fisher Kennelly Hooker Rawson Twain Webster

4

9a.

If children from eligible Title t attendance areas attend6d nonpublic schools, met the criteria to receive services, and received services of the town's Title I ESEA program - -indicate the number of such children and the names of the nonpublic schools from which they came. Not applicable.

9b.

Describe the specific services these children received. See pages 91-95.

9c.

If the Title I services for nonpublic school children were different from the services provided for public school children, indicate the value of such services on a separate page and attach to this report.

Consult the Connecticut School Register for the statistics to re provided for questions 10,11, and 12 below. 10a.

b.

lla.

b.

12a.

b.

13.

List the number of children and youth directly served by the project who were promoted to the next grade level at the end of school year 1968-69.

List the number of children and youth directly served by the project who were not promoted to the next grade level at the end of school year 1968-69.

1014

.

Give the aggredate days of attendance .f children and youth directly served 'ay the project. (Consult the ANNUAL SUMMARY; Number of Days in Attendance in the Connecticut School Register)

Give the aggregate dajs of membership of children and (Consult the ANNUAL youth directly served by the project. SUMMARY, Number of Days in Membership in the Connecticut School Register) List the number of grade 7-12 youth served by the project who withdrew from school from July 1, 19E8 to June 30, 1969. (Consult the MONTHLY SUMMARIES and give the sum total of Dl, D6, D111 and D17)

188

96634

130603

85

List the number of grade 7-12 youth served by the project who remained in school from July 1, 1968 to June 30, 1969. (Subtract the number of grade 7-12 withdrawals from the total number of grade 7 through 12 public school youth 415 served in the program) Report the standardized test results secured for children in the program in TABLE I on the following page.

roup*

..

1. Picture Directians 2. Word Matching 3. Word Card Matching 4. Rhyming 5. Letters and

Test Subsection

'

4, rM

1. Picture Directione 2. Word Matching 3. Word Card Matching . Rhyidng 5. Letters and Numbers

44

ge,

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19696

b

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*Any :symbol used that identifellip pie-test results with posh -test results for the same g.our. of childre7.

Gates Reading Readiness Test

Test Subsection

4 Form 44 @

GROUP POST-TEST SCORE BY GRADE LEVEL

nation Name of Test

Desig-

Group*

F

I

Gates Reading Readiness Tbst

TEST SC

I Hartford STANDARDIZED TEST RESULTS FOR STUDENTS PARTICIPATING IN TITLE I AND PA 35 PROGRAMS

.iation Name of Test

Pesig-

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Test Subsection Form

Numbers

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14. Rhyming 5.

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Gates Reading 1. Picture DirecReadiness Test tions 2. Word Matching 3. Word Card Match;

Name of Test

GROUP POST -TEST SCORES BY GRADE LEVEL

NUmbpra

5. Letters and

I

Form

May

f

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10

Oct. 10

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:

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*Any symbol used that identifies pre-test results with post-test results for the same group of children.

inatio

iproup* iDesig-

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Ward Card Matel.pt

4. Rhyming

3.

L Word Matching

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Readiness Test

Gates Reading

)

4

TABLE I STANDARIZED TEST RESULTS FOR STUDENTS PARTICIPATING IN TITLE I AND PA 35 PROGRAMS

4

Test Subsection

r

Hartford

nation Name of Test

Desig-

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Tarim.,

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'The Macmillan Reading Readiness That

r

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Visual Perceptionoi Auditory Percepti Vocabulary and Concepts

Test Subsection

orm

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*Any symbol used that identifies pre-test results

ination

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Visual Perception Auditory Perceptio4 Vocabulary and Concepts

,

GROUP POST-TEST SCORES BY GRADE LEVEL

The Macmillan Reading Readineas That

Group* Designation rName of Test

et

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il

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113. OF STUDENTS SCORING ACCORDING TO NATIONAL NORM

7

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for the same group of children.

52

38

25th %-

NO. OF STUDENTS SCORING ACCORDING NO TO *NATIONAL NOM

!I tile and 1

:1

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1g

°

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TABLE SZANDARDIZED TEST RESULTS FOR STUDENTS PARTICIPATING IN TITLE I AND PA 35 PROGRAMS

GROUP PRE.-TESIeSCORES BY GRADE LE

Ton Hartfcrsi

I

s

1

1

1

Activities Simple repetition of model utterances Answering questions Reading aloud Conversation Dramatization Dialogue, etc.

parencies, newspapers, magazines, books, etc.

stories, songs, games, trans -,

Growth ins Activities using the following Listaningi materiels: CampreSound films, tapes, records, pension teacher models, picture.,

II. Growth in Speech Production

I.

Major Project ACTIVITIES and Services: A running narrative of the project description

1

State the FINDINGS from the data given

I

1. Locally constructed, tests (E.s.L. Department) a. Action pictures to elicit single, sentence responses b. Answering questions c. Reading aloud 2. Used by E.S.L. teachers for all 4. non-English students.

Instrument

chisvoment of nonAnglish students by E.S.L. teachers at time of initial interview and again after six aonths of instruction in English As A Second Language.

2. Used for placement and/Or am.

ments)

Findings Speech production, of course, is more difficult for these students than listening comprehension. It is far easier for them to follow directions than to reproduce or produce orally in English.

Findings Instrument The locally constructed tests are 1. Locally constructed tests (E.S.L. Department) being piloted this year. Some findings already are that these a. Spoken stimulus on tape. I 4-1 Student is asked to sestudents can comprehend orally 7%) lect a response from mini more than most teachers realize. \-11 tiple-choice answers (pictures and/or state-

EVALUATIVE INSTRUMENT or technique designated to measure growth toward the objective, including: when used, with whom, by whom constructed, and other pertinent data

Give the evaluator's INTERPRETATION of the FINDINGS for each objective. The INTERPRETATION should follow the last FINDING for a given objective and occupy the space cf two or more columns. If additional pages are used in reporting objective evaluation, continue the use of 8x11 paper in "chart form" as arranged on this first page.

Evaluation of Objectives: Use the following chart form in restating and evaluating the objectives directl., related to changes expected of children and youth receiving project services. As important as other objectives might be that have been set by the town, report only the effect of project services on the children selected for the project.

iOBJECTIVE or LEARNING OUTCOME

14.

Activities Instrument F' dings Themes - Students learn their 1. Locally constructed tests Many of the students are not liter vocabulary and comprehension (r.S.I. Department) ate in their mother tongue and, from the extended study of a. Vocabulary - Pictures therefore, find it practically the oral themes based on the with a choice of four impossible to learn to read in vital needs of these children. words, one of which is to English. Self identification - The be matched with the picIn many cases, comprehension score. School - The Hone - The Neighture. Vocabulary based were found to be higher than vocab borhood - The Family - Holion E.S.L. books written ulary.scores. These students have days - Seasons - Weather for use in Latin American learned their vocabulary through Calendar - Time - Clothing countries. context and need it for comprehenFood - Transportation b. Comprehension - Stories sion. Money - City Life - Rural to be read silently by Life - Occupations, etc. the student and questions to be answered about the story. All vocabulary based on E.S.. materials written for the non English speaking. 2. Gates Reading Readiness Tests Students attending E.S.L. classes were given at Kinsella to a were able to raise their average control group and to one E.S.L. mean' raw score from 8 to 18; their group. The E.S.L. group atmedian percentile score from 31 tp tended E.S.L. classes 5 days 65. No mean grade equivalency per week (40 minutes per day) scores are given for Reading Readifor a period of 6 months. The ness Tests. control group attended no E.S.L. The number of students scoring classes and received their inaccording to national norms changed struction in English in a regufrom 2 (below 25%) to 0, from 7 lar classroom. Tests were ad(26 to 50t) to 1, from 1 (51 to ministered in October and again 75%) to 5, and from 0 (above 761) in May. to 4. Students attending no E.S.L. classe and receiving their instruction in English in a regular classroom raised their average mean raw score from 12 to 21 and their median percentile score from 47 to 66.

State the FINDINGS from the data given

III. Growth in Reading

EVALUAtivb INSTRUMENT or technique designated to measure growth toward the objective, including: when used, with whom, by whom constructed, and other pertinent data

Major Project ACTIVITIES and Si ricep: A running narrative of the project description

OBJECTIVE or LEARNING OUTCOME

V. English Proficiency

Lictivities

IV. Growth in Writing

Activities Using plurals Using prepositions Using possessive nouns Completing sentences Selecting correct verb fora Use of verbs Agreement of verbs Counting and giving missing numbers

Fbrming the letters (upper and lower case) - manuscript and cursive Writing sentences Taking dictation Using punctuation Spelling Grammatical structure Vocabulary Composition

Major Project ACTIVITIES and Se: Weal A running narrative of the project description

OBJECTIVE or LEARNING OUTCOME

1. Locally constructed teats (E.S.L. Department) 2. To teat English proficiency of speakers of other' languages on entering the E.S.L. program at H.M.S. and at various stages of progress. 3. Test ranges in difficulty from Level I to IV.

Ins trusent

.

EVALUATIVE INSTRUMENT or technique designated to measure growth toward the objective including: when used, with whom, by ,whom constructed, and other pertinent data Instrument 1. Locally constructed tests (E.S.L. Department) 2. To be used by E.S.L. teachers at time of placement and/Or for achievement after six months of instruction.

Findings The median percent score at the end of the first semester was 63 and in June had changed to 70. The greatest change came at the 801to. 89 percent score. In February,T fifteen students came within this range while 41 fell within this range in June.

Findings Most writing is extremely poor. E.S.L. teachers do not have sufficient time to give to the literary arts. Their time is consumed in oral language instruction.

State the FINDINGS from the data given

OBJECTIVE or LEARNING OUTCOME

Major Project ACTIVITIES and Ser"*tceaz A running narrative of 0 project description

3. The Macmillan Reading Readiness Test was given to 32 ungraded primary students of E.S.L. at Barnard-Brown in October and again in May.

___

EVALUATIVE INSTRUMENT or technique designated to measure growth toward the objective, including: when used, with whom, by whoa constructed, and other pertinent data

- Above 76 (2) The E.S.L. students were able to raise their mean raw scores from an average of 35 to 42; their media percentile scores from 38 to 52. The number of students pcoring according to national norms changed from 7 (below 25) to 3, from 16 (26 - 50) to 10, from 9 (51 75)to and from t)(above 76) to 2.

-51 -75 (3)

E.S.L. - Below 25 (Li) - 26 - 50 (6) - 51 - 75 (8) - Above 76 (2) Control Group - Below 25 (0) - 26 - 50 (5)

The change in the number of student scoring according to national norms is as follows:

19.

In comparison, the E.S.L. students gained one more point on average mean raw scores than the control group. Average median percentile scores for E.S.L. students increase by 34. Control group increase was

2.

The number of students scoring according to national norms changed from 6 (26 - 50) to 1, from 4 (51 75) to 7, and from 0 (76 above) to

State the FINDINGS from the data given

5.

15.

Aside from the evaluation made of program objectives, indicate any successful outcomes resulting from Title I or PA 35 efforts in the town during the past year. See pages 9L & 95.

16.

Aside from the evaluation made of program objectives, indicate any problems resulting from Title I efforts in the town during the past year.

See pages 96 & 97.

-1301. EVALUATION OF PA 35 (SADC) AND TITLE I (ESEA) PROGRAMS FOR FISCAL YEAR 1969

(1) Source of Program Funds: ( ) Title I

Program Directox

Program Evaluator12uia/12aiina____

( X) PA 35 (

Robert C. Miles

) Jointly Funded Title I and PA 35

Date Evaluation was subm!tted_LIA___

(2) Period of Project: ( ) School year project only Summer pr6ject only ) School year and summer ( project

Descriptive Title of Program: SO

0

e.

en

-

SADC Amount Approved $ 37,990.

(3) Name(s) of public schools where children received the services of the program: Not applicable

Title I Amount Approved $ Project No. 64-1.Hartford Component 7.

Town

Hartfnrri

(4) List the number of staff members of the following classification whose total or partial salaries are included in the program budget: (

) teacher

(

) aide'

(2

) administrator

(

(

) special service (counselor, psychological examiner, speech therapist, social worker, or medical)

) unpaid volunteers

(5) Give an unduplicated count of public school children directly served by this program.

N/A

(6) Give the unduplicated count of public school children served by grade level.

PreK

K

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

pul.er .--

,

(7) a.

b.

t

Indicate the hours per week of direct services to children or youth.

N/A

Indicate the duration in weeks of project activities for youth.

N/A

(8) List below the criteria used to select children for services of the program being evaluated (economic criteria and educational criteria)

SUPPORTIVE SERVICE - SEE NARRATIVE

-1311.

EVALUATION OF PA 35 (SADO) AO TITLE I (FSEA) PROGEAI.I5 FOR. FISCAL YEAR 1969

William Paradis

(1) Source of Program Funds: ( ) Title I (X) PA 35 (PA 611) ) Jointly Funded Title I ( and PA 35

Program Directoll

(2) Period of Project: (X) School year project only ) Summer project-only ( ( ) School year and summer project

Descriptive Title of Program:

Program Evaluator Robert J. Nearine 7-1_69

Date Evaluation was submitted

Project

SAffAmount Approved $ 14L,590 Title I Amount Approved $

(3) Name(s) of public schools where children received the,services of the program:

Project No. 64-1

Town

Hartford

(4) List the number of staff members of the following classification whose total or partial salaries are included in the program budget: ) teacher

(

(

) special service (counselor, psychological examiner, speech therapist, social worker, or medical)

(

) aide.

) administrator

(

(

) unpaid volunteers

(5) Give an unduplicated count of public school children directly served by this program.

587

(6) _Give the unduplicated count of public school children served by grade level. ,

iPreK

K

1

2

3

1

4

5

6

7

8

9

11

10

12

Other`

.

i

461171118796,75

33

22

I

1

(7) a.

b.

i .

Indicate the hours per week of direct services to children or youth.

30

Indicate the duration in weeks of project activities for youth.

40

(8) list below the criteria used to select children for services of the program being evaluated (economic criteria and educational criteria) Random selection of children from all target area schools.

-132-

2.

9a.

If children from eligible Title I attendance areas attended nonpublic schools, met the criteria to receive services, and received services of the town's Title I ESEA program - -indicate the number of such children and the names of the nonpublic schools from which they came. Not applicable. Services were furnished under separate funding.

9b.

Describe the specific services these children received. .Services will be described in a separate evaluation.

9c.

If the Title I services for nonpublic school children were different from the services provided fer public school children, indicate the value of such services on a separate page and attach to this report. N/A

Consult the Connecticut School Register for the statistics to ee provided for questions 10,11, and 12 loclow. We cannot do this 10a.

b.

List .the number of children and youth directly served by the project who were promoted to the next grade level at the end of school year 1968-69.

List the number of children and youth directly served by the project who were not promoted to the next grade level at the end of school year 1968-69.

lla.

Give the aggregate days of attendance of children and youth directly served 'ay the project. (Consult the ANNUAL SUMMARY; Number of Days in Attendance in the Connecticut School Register)

b.

Give the aggregate days of membership of children and youth directly served by the project. ( Consult the ANNUAL SUMMARY, Number of Days in Membership in the Connecticut School Register)

12a.

b.

13.

544

43

106.490

List the number of grade 7-12 youth served by the project who withdrew from school from July 1, 1968 to June 30, 1969. (Consult the MONTHLY SUMMARIES and give the sum total of Dl, D6, D11, and D17) List the number of grade 7-12 youth served by the project who remained in school from July 1, 1968 to June 30, 1969. (Subtract the number of grade 7-12 withdrawals from the total number of grade 7 through 12 public school youth 22 served in the program) Report the standardized test results secured for children in the program in TABLE I on the following page. Additional information will be reported in a separate evaluation.

14

2

-1331.

EVATUATION OF PA 35 (SADC) AND TITLE I (FSEA) PROGRAMS FOR FISCAL YEAR 1969

H DiCorleto Program Director Helen

(1) Source of Program Funds: ( ) Title I (X) PA 35 ( ) Jointly Funded Title I and PA 35

Progrom EvaluatorRobert J. Nearine Date Evaluation was submitted

7/1/69

Descriptive Title of Program:

(2) Period of Project: (X) Sci-Aool year project only ( ) Summer project only ( ) Se:11°61 year and summer prcject

Project Read

36,00_

SADC Amount Approved $

Title I Amount Approved $ (3) Name(s) of public schools where Project No._6,L=1____ children received the services of the program: Arsenal,Branard-Brown, Dwight, Town_BaLiford Northwest-Jones. (4) List the number of staff members of the following classification whose total or partial salaries are included in the program budget: (

) teacher

(

) aide.

(

) administrator

(

(

) special service (counselor, psychological examiner, speech therapist, social worker, or medioal) ) unpaid volunteers

(5) Give an unduplicated count of public school children directly served by this program.

1941

(6) Give the unduplicated count of public school children served by grade level.

PreK

K

1

2

540

432

3

4

5

503

6

10

o her !

11

466

;

(7) a.

b.

Indicate the hours per week of direct services to children or youth. Indicate the duration in weeks of project activities for youth.

34

(8) List below the criteria used to select children for services of the program being evaluated (economic criteria and educational criteria) Assignment to a grade in one of the project schools.

presently in preparation. A Separate Evaluation 7 is expected in September,1969.

Distribution