ERIC ED078447: Huntington's PACE Project. Final Evaluation Report

DOCUMENT RESUME D 078 447 TITLE INSTITUTION SPONS AGENCY PUB DA_ T E NOTE = EDRS PRICEDESCRIPTORS IDENTIFIERS CS 200 632 Huntington's PACE Proje...

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DOCUMENT RESUME D 078 447

TITLE INSTITUTION SPONS AGENCY PUB DA_ T E

NOTE

=

EDRS PRICEDESCRIPTORS

IDENTIFIERS

CS 200 632 Huntington's PACE Project. Final Evaluation Report. Suffolk County Board of Cooperative Educational Services, Huntington, N.Y. Of=fice of Education (DREW), Washington, D.C. Projects - to Advance Creativity in Education. Jul 70 68p. -

= MF- $0. 65 HC-S 3. 29

*Aesthetic Education; Art Appreciation; *Cultural Enrichment; Humanities; *Junior High Schools; -*Theater Arts *PACE

ABSTRACT

AK

Summariied are the findings and evaluations- of a PACE Project, working closely with the Performing Arts Foundation of Huntington Township near New York City, on a program which explored ways in which the professional performing arts could successfully be used in education -to foster aesthetic appreciation, understanding and involvement. The project was directed towards 16,000 students in grades seven through nine. Employed were artists of high quality, young dancers of, limited experience, various quality performing artists and groups, and a district coordinator. _The validity of the program was attested to by (1) the -8 superintendents after the end of 3-years, (2) some districts had broadened the scope of the program, and (3) other school districts committed funds for _participation,. in he= -program: --(110D):

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FILMED FROM BEST AVAILABLE COPY

RECT.:1117D

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF NEALTIL EDUCATION ILWILPARE NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF EDUCATION

AUG 2

1970 ' catai$ Uiu 1mivovAriOil

'THIS DOCUMENT HAS EEEN'REPRO

DUCED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED FROM

THE PERSON DR ORGANIZATIONORIGIN ATING IT POINTS OF VIEW DR OPINIONS STATED DO NOTNECESSARILY REPRE SENT OFFICIAL NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF EDUCATION POSITION OR POLICY.

EQMADOIN

BOARD OF COOPERATIVE EDUCATIONAL SERVICES Third Supervisory District Suffolk County Huntington, 11.Y.

.

Huntingtonts =PACE PROJECT

SED---Project., P- _laratifigiiProject

-041,73 66!-.9g8

02erational-rGrant-_-0W-04-032030-18131056V - OF "03283_ --- Project-I-Number:.

FINAL =EVALUATION REPORT

July

1970

GOrclOn

WheatOn,

:Superintendezit

-Project Direcrr-; .

ONTEITTS.

Evaluation Summary of Findings Statement- of thcii Problem-

Attacking the Problem Analyzing the Data Findings Conclusions & Recommendations ,

7

12

15 21

rticipating School Districts

ACE Personnel

Enclosures

Performances, 1%7-70 Job Descriptions Coordinators DataCollection Forms Feedback, Performances, 1967-6S The _Assembly= Program Trap Artist-in-Residence Classroom Experiences Evaluation, In-Service Teacher Training, 1963-70 Evaluation, Saturday Workshop (Teacher Interview) PAF Reflects Community Needs Dissemination

5,

-3SUMI4ARY OF FIITDISTGS

1.

A successful start has been made in defining the role of the nrofessional performing artist in-the school community_ and finding apnropriate ways of relating the art forms to all curriculum areas.

2.

The greatest barrier to the iaplementation of the program is the school personnel.

ide

Therefore, orientation and in-serv-

training of school nersonnel is required And_a catalyst.

coordinator is needed in each building to articulate ?the PACE concept of the roLe of= aesthetics in education.

No annropriate evaluation tools applicable to the measurement of the impact of this project on students are available. Three years of federal seed'funding'.have 'brought about fis-

cal commitment

for the program on the part-of five local

school districtS (on, a limited scale), serious interest in,

and consideration of the project in several other distriotb,

some of which are

outside the original PACE area.

The implementation of PACE was helped significantly by the regional nature of BOCES, by its.shared service

concvlt,.and

by BOCES III's sensitivity to the differences between, and the needs o2 its various schobl districts.

Success depends also,

on the BOCES administration's acceptance of the program's premises as to the place of aesthetics in education, thereby enabling it to avoid the pitfall of becoming a booking agency for perforiaing arts agencies which hawk their wares, but make

no committhent.to the community served.

A community-based'nrofepsional nerforming arts agency (ie. PAF) is best suited to implementation of the program because: a.

it answers,the need -fora new organizational arrangement to deal with the unions involved;

b.

it' is able to seek out the nrofessional artists willing= to begin to accept some responsibility to the School- community;

c..

it serves as a force to educate the school districts as =to .their responsibility to ilster the professional performing arts in the general cmiand murritr

d.

it can provide the schools with a performing arts program at the highest level of sophiStidation and quality through the use of the= economically sound nrofessional "bus and truck* methods,of production, and by offering evening, performances, it can fost-er adult financial And artistic support.

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STATEMENT OF THE PROEILET4

The history of American education makes clear that the performing arts have been considered periPheral tr' society; that

participation in performing arts experiences has been availeple piiMarily to .those who have already evidenced interest and com-

mitmGnt

and that an absembly program and-a very occasional

field trip to a professional performance has been considered sufficient exposure for the Majority of students.

The history of the performing-arts in America makes clear that the arts have been interested in education only if they were not otherwise successfully engaged. Recently a nuMber of studies in the behavioral saienc

have

focused attention on the use of aesthetic education as a potent

fOrce for fostering both cognitive and affe

'ye learning:

This

is effective when the schools look beyond the short-term goals of arts ,- courses and offer all students opportunity foi :participation in, and creation and contem2lation of aesthetic experiences. The performing arts, concerned' with the images which reflect the

human condition, can play a unique role in the development of new approaches to learning and good pedagogy, important now when the accelerated rate ,of change in our culture,

the' "fact" eznlosion,

and the alienation of youth make it vital that we motivate and .emotionally involve students. The PACE Project, working closely with the Performing Arts Foundation of Euntington Towns lip (PAV), an organization (chart,

ered by the 17.1% State Board of aegents) committed to high arilstic standards and a _Tole of responsible leadership in the educe-

tional community, has explored ways in which the professional

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Performing arts can successfully be used in education to foster aesthetic alpreciation,-understanding and involVement.

ram has

sought answers to the following questions:

1. How to create and execute a plan whereby the performing arts can become an integral part .of the curriculum in a way that 'enriches the general curriculum rather than re-

inforcing the segregation of the arts; a.

by determining the role of the professional artist, in the_classroom, finding apnropriate ways, o2 relating his art form-to,many curriculum- areas by inVolving teacher and student in the use of the art forms to clarify, reinforce and e4tend culum objectives;

b.

by providing a sequential program ofAusic, theatre and dance nerformances with sufficient frequency, quality and'rengel designed to'increase the child'sopnortunity to grow intellectually, emotionally, critically and aestheti-sally; st.,)

c.

by determining it quality artists can be attracted to, and become equally committed to, an educational ;grogram and regional = adult theatre.

2. Can the validity of the regional concept to plan an:1 to

implement nrograms in the professional performing arts that maintain maximum ouality standards and minimum cosx: .

factors be demonstrated through: a.

the extension of the BCC E5 shared service activities into the area of the humanities and arts;_

b.

the priority established by PM' when it initiated cooperation with, and provision of services to the schools to encourage the integration of the professional performing arts into the curriculum, in accordance with one of its original purposes;

c.

obtaining the sunport of the adult community for a regional theatre based on the premises of this program.

ATTACKIIIGTWPROBLEM 1.

The numbezAndnatureof the pubjects The Board of Cooperative Educational Services CSOCEO, 3rd Supervisory District of Suffolk County, 'consists of 18 ae2hool .list-icts"in three townships.

Huntington Township, with

school districts, was .selected by the BOCES administration

for the pilot PACE Project.

It is a suburban community, 32 -

40-miles fson New York CIty, with a total population of 190, 0

000 (1970).

Spending 'approNimately'$4-100. to $1,300. per

oupiljn its schools, the conraunity has demonstrated serious commitment

to quality education of its students who reore-

sent a mixture of income levels and ethnic bimkgrounds. The project was' directed towards the 16,000 students in

the 7-9 grades, enrolled in 8 public school districts with 7

,

15 junior high. school buildings, 7th and Oth grades in 6 parochial achools and a -9th grade in one parochial high

iool.

These schools employ approximatly 650 teachers. 2.

The activities employed a.

Plannina,period

196'6 -150 000

Z Planning Committee of 27 educators (1 elementary, 1 secondary, 1 administrator from each of the 8 oublic schobl districts and from the parochial school complex) met for 6-- months (Seturclays and after dilhool) with PAP

staff and professional artists as consultanta to determine the role of the professional performing artist in the school curriculum for grades X-12. This 5coup formed into 8 = sub-committees: 1) Research: Previous Studies of Related Endeavors and a Survey of the Performing Arts in Huntington Township; 2) Educational Rationale; 3) Goals an Objectives of a Performing,Arts Curriculum; 4). Music in a Performing Arts Curriculum; 5) Dence in a Performing Arts Curriculum; 6) Theatre in a Performing Arts Curriculum; lq Teacher Orientation.

.niter

consideration of the recommendatibris of these seven committees, the-?AF staff detigned a K-12 program which was submitted to, and adopted by the 8th committee, Fihancing and Logistics. Subsequently, when-the 1st operational grant was cut from the rpqu6sted S785,520. to $288,607., -the Planning-Committee decided to implement the program in grades 7--9. Staffing_ the.

Project

The performing artst personnel were selected on the basis of both conmiiilaant -to their artsformrand commitment to fUrthering their own professional artistic careers little or no consideration was given' to any working background in education. ll Actin

n

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itv)

uan

Artists of- high quality were sought out (no mention of the,school program being made and no pressures exerted for them to move to the community) and employed th& first two years oh a job basis, and the= third year on contract.. Orientation for the school program followed hiring. During the- course of their work here, many developed significant coromitmcmt to the program.. 2) Dance Company (non-union) This company tier created-in somewhat the same manner,- but the Director chose to utilize nonunion, young danceza of more limited enperlence who, it was found, required more guidance for the classroom activities. 3)

c.

In addition to these companies, various quality performing artists and groups were employed on a short-term basis to im2lement -the full program recommended by the Planning Committee.

02erational Grant, 196760 - 12811_607.-1. 1) Performances: 4 ilusid

4 Dance 4 Theatre (8=441)

2) Orie.ntation and Training - District and Buildis-g Coordinators Meetings with PACE staff-min. 2 per month Individual conferences

4,Resident Artist Classroom Activity As reqUested by school

t

-94) Orientation an In-Service Training - Teachers Fall Confererice (21/2 days) for all participants_ in the progrard. Theme: "How does Huntington's PACE Project relate to the humanities and/or arts program'," sponsored by federal, state and local -agenCies?"-and "What furtter steps can PACE. take to implement its goals?" d. 2na- 0Nrational Grant,- 1953-69 - 12304607. 1) Perfo4mqnces: 3 Music 3 Dance 3 Theatre (Enc1.01) 1 Combination of three art forms

2) Resident Artist Classroom Activity -Each buildinChEr...4the PAP Dance Enserable -in-_

_residence or--a-rae*er: of the Resident Acting

(Company- in_reaidence _for 4 weeks.

3) OrientatiOeand_ Ine;:erViee- Training - Teachers_

a) Pall Conference (21/2 days) for all participants. Theme: "The Validity of the PACE oProceati and, the Reality of Local Funding." b) 10 week In-Service-courseti open (free) to all junior .high teachers, sponsored by BOCES, conducted by Project Director and A/Rs. Title: "Integrating the Performing Arts-into the Curriculum." 105 teachers participated in 2 sessions; 74. earned Credit.

e. 3r(.1 Operational Grant./ 1969-70, - $.185.8000.. 1) Resident Artist Classramt Activity _

,

Each building haiLan actor in residence for shorter 32 weeks, 3 (lancers and 2 musicians presented periods. Workshop, productions were in- classrooms at the request of the teacher. 2) Performanc6s: 1 Dane 2 Theatre (Encl. 01) .rvicer' Training - 'teachers 3) Orientation .ane, a) 10 sweek in-Service course, "The Humanities and the--Arts" eponsored by BOCES, conducted by 'ACE stilff, open to all teachers *at a feeof r:e30., attended by 10. b Saturday Mori:011013s - Two teachers from each district (consultant fee of :35. paid by

project) -attended all-day workshops to

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explore with At as theatre techniques for achieving curriculum objectives. .

1st Worhchon - Meth and Science teachers 2nd WorkdSop - English and Social studies c) District-wide (1 day) Humanities and.Arts Conferences in thrso sehool districts. f.

SunaortinTActivities PAP presented weekend evening and matinee performancns of selected productions for the adult community and for young people not served by the school program, with a view to the development of fiscal and artistic support for the educational nregram.

Collection of Data In 1967 6S, when a budgeted item of $46,000. for contract.

ing with Educational Testing Service for development of in,

struments to measure student behavioral change (primarily in

-the affective domin) was not approved, a Test and Measurement Consultant was employed to recommend data collection instru-

-mentsandfor to develop suitable tools.

By November, 19G7,

it became evident that adequate instruments for pro$uct eval-

uation were not available and that limited funds an6 pe;:sonnel precluded the development o2 such tools. ( One test, a r'emantic

Differential, was devised and administered)

Therefore, the

major emphasis was placed on process evaluation.

The following personnel/ in edition to PACE staff, teachers and artists, aided in the collection of data: a.

District Coordinators:

A coordinator from each Oistrict and from the narocbial school complex mad* up the Steering Committee (Encl. 02. Job descrintion). Each received a consult/-)ant fee of $500.' paid by the project in the first year and 'by the districts in the 2nd and 3rd years (in dollars or services in kind),

b. Building Curriculum Coordinators (BCCIE_ Chosen by the district for each building (Encl. 02. Job description) an& paid a consultant fee of $800. c. Evaluation Consultant (part time) The data collection devices included: a: Performances

BCC feedback sheets*; Steering Committee feedback; taoes of °informal= meetings of

1967-68-69

artists with students and of PACE staff with school staff; professional news media reviews of productions. (on file.) BCC feedback sheets =- were= discontinued and

1969-70

replaced by attendance figures.

b. A/R classroom experiences 1967;-68-69

1969-70

,

Artists' daily reports*; anecdotal reports*; artists' classroom project re-

ports*; feedback from Steering Committee. Teachers' classioom project reports were discontinued and replaced by interviews

with selected teachers by evaluation con-

sultant.

c. In-Service Teacher Training Informal feedback (participants' comments 1967-68

- at Fall Conference)

1968-69 1969-70

Same as above and evaluation forms from

course participants.* Course participants' evaluation forms*: conferences, informal discussion and letters from participants in Saturday

Workshoos.

11-..... :* Encl. #3. Data collection forMs.

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ANALYZING TEE DATA (EVALUATION) 1.

ljnothosis in terms of objectives "The arts are not for their place is not on that they are not central importance to

a privileged few but for the many, that the periphery of society but at its cent -ax just a form of recreation but are of our well being and happiness..."*

"We need to expose all of the children in our schools to all ** of the arts and to do so in a way that enriches the general curriculum rather than reinforcing the segregation of the arts.."

"The performing rts are most meaningful to the. hild as a spectator if heli sAnvolved as a participant--and that involvement deepens when-he sees and hears quality performances."* .

"The quality of individual liv&.:s and the quality of our soc- **

iety are directly related to the quality of our artistic life. The PACE Project- objectives were to develop a program which

would provide answers to the above statements.

-tle have worked

.

on the assumption that: a.

a sequential series drprofessional performances of quality, range and frequency, geared-to the intellectual and emotional lev'l of the student* would provide aesthetic experiences of 'educational value--and that the experiences should stand or fall on the basis of (Thus, teachers were asked to the artists' limit adyanced. preparation to title, names of performers, and at most a brief synopsis of plot, reserving fuller discussion for post-nerformance class time.),

b.

involving the artist-in-residence with students, using the art- form to extend, reinforce and clarify the curriculum in the classroom would: 1 -)

2)

c.

deepen student appreciation and understanding of the arts as an integral part of all experience--which would then bring about a greater appreciation of the performance;' and make available to the teacher a unique teaching tool which would lend itself to both cognitive and affective learning experiences,

the goals of the project would best be served if a regional professional performing arts organization

Rockefeller Panel Report-The Performing Arts-Problems and :::Protpects. ntGrawHbiill, 1965 John D. Rockefeller -speech- General Assembly of the Arts and ':ltEdUcation Council of Greater St. Louis. May 17, 1969.

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with high artistic standards and a commitment tomeeting the needs of the particular community, acted as producing agency. Such an organiiation could best exercise quality control--in part because of its ability to sponsor performances for adults, and this attract superior artists;

2.

d.

constraints would arise as the program evolved and that feedback information from the schools would result in program adaptations;

e.

the district and building coordinators would be the key people in determining the success of the schools' involvement in the program;

f.

sdhool personnel and artists would need orientation and training in techniques of integrating the performing arts into the curriculum and in overcoming possible resistance to the ideas and procedures of the program;

g.

if the procedures and program were valid in terms of the needs =of the participating districts; these districts would demonstrate an interest in cantinuing the project beyond the three years of federal funding.

Techniques used to handle the data The collection and interpretation of process evaluation data has been directed toward determining to what extent the projects activities were effecting teacher behavioral change (while keeping in mind that the "good" teacher has always used the arts as a teaching device in whatever forms they were a-

vailable); toward assessing the-artists' behavior in classroom activities; and toward evaluation and modification of the system devised.

Dr. Francis J. Crowley,

an evaluation consultant (Assoc-

iate Professor at Fordham University) in a letter of April 22, 1969 (on file) commented on the techdiques we were employing and on the objectivity of our 1967-6S Evaluation Report.

The evaluation instruments in use provid an in-flow of data from the schools which is subjected to analysis by the

5,- A

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PACE staff and form the basis of it's recommendations to the Steering Committee for modifications and adaptations of the program.

Weekly A/R meetings are utilized for an exchange of in.

formation, discussion of classroom activity techniques, and of problems arising with students,_ teachers or administrators. In the.third year, an evaluation consultant, conductin4 in-depth interviews with selected teachers to assess the suc-

cess and/or failure of the A/R classroom exoerionCe, increased the productivity76f evaluation of,the many facets of the A/R

program by obtaining for the staff detailed information relating to the student/teacher resnonse to the activity and, in addition, prepared a document of successful A/R activities for dissemination to the teachers.

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FINDINGS. -Performances

The summaries of the BCC feedback information for the first two years (Encl. 04) attest to a generally favorable assessment.

Program Quality Student Teacher

For example: 1967-63 32% excelleht-very good Content: u u 91% of Performance _:, 80% Reaction a a a 01% Reaction is

is

ss

-

1963-69 65.6%

76 % 49.4% 65.7%

The ratings in the first year reflect a natural enthusiasm for something new.

In the second year some of the problems inher-

ent in an innovative program became more evident, such as: 1.

2.

the minimizing of student potential for appreciation and the controversy created on-the selection of appropriate material, although the program was planned by *teacher committees;

the difficulty most teachers encountered-in accenting the recommendation by the Planning Committee to minimize student preparation ant to place emphasis on postperformance classroom disdUssion.

.In the course of the second year, several districts suggested allowing students to have the choice of attending (90% did), leading in the third year to the Steering Committee's decision

to offer all students the choida ofattending at a small fee; thus allowing students to demonstrate what interest gh and commitment

to the programs may have been generated by the

first two years and by the A/R classroom experiences.

Attend-

ance figures for the 3rd year were:* Rod Rogers Modern Dance Co. Inherit-the Wind - Residi.Int Acting Co. Ernest n Love - Resident Acting Co. *

3774 6766 5260

Theoretically the offer was available to 16,000 students, but in actuality tickets were not made available to every grade in every school by the BCC. Results were not affected by the scheduling problems as the time of performance was at the school's discretion, but they were affected by the quality of the involvement of ;ale BCC and school staffs.

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Our producing techniques proved successful- -the schools

found that they could-bus as many as 1200 students several times a year, a rather unique undertaking.

When productions

were stationary, attendance compulsory and the students were bussed to a strange school, behavior problems sodetimes arose. But when the productionnaas trucked to each-school and/or when attendance was by choice, the behavior problems were minimized-or ceased entirely.

We have found that the performance has not had as ready fl

an acceptance by the school personnel as the A/R program.

After_ three'years there are stiI1those in the schools who _

do not show sufficient respect for students' capacities;

who do not

recognize any distinction between "assembly pro-

grams" and fully staged professional productions (Encl. #5); who deny the artists' integrity and ability to make a state-

ment to students; and who do not recognize the PACE priority and resent the time taken from "the curriculum". The artists find the experience of performing in the sdhools

difficult, but-we-have been ableto attract and retain fine performers by, in some instances', exposing them to the idea

gradually, and by providing weekend adult audiences. Artist -in- Residence

In response to feedback from the schools, an increasing

proportion of the budgeted-funds was allocated to the A/R aspect each year:

The A/R was utilized by teachers as a tool for the clarification, extention and reinforcement of curriculum objectives and to effect change in student attitude and behavior throUgh

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physical, verbal or sensory involvement of students (Encl. #6). The techniques most often used were, the A/R as a model (reader, actor, mime, etc.); exercises in preparation for,

and direction of role playing and improvisation; and sense perception exercises. t

Improvisation has proven to be the

most effective technique as it stresses student participation and involvement in the art form rather than passivity and skills. In the third year.over 442 documented A/R classroom experiences took place (as compared to 27 documented in the first year) in the following subject areas:

Art, Business, Communi-

cation Skills, English, Foreign Language, Gym, Home Economics, Humanities, Industrial Arts, Math, Music, Religion, Science, Social Studies, Special Education.' Responding to the usefulness of the experience in 87 evaluation interviews

the teachers reported 77 experiences ranged

from excellent to good; 6 fair and 4 poor.

In 84 cases the

teacher reported that the curriculum objective was achieved and, where the teacher was willing to make .an estimate, 23 reported 100% of the students understood the .curriculum objective, 23 rep6rted 50 -9596 and 4 reported under 50%.

23 teach-

ers felt that the shy, quiet or slow child benefited most, 11 thought the bright, and 1 felt average students'benefited. They reported that in 10 cases attitudes were definitely changed, and in 7 cases behavior.

41 teachers said that the

experience had demonstrated techniques which they would be able to use themselves--16 stated that the AIR was the necessary ingredient in the experience.

In each of the 10 fair to poor, the consultant found that

there had not ben sufficient dialogue to promote a clear

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understanding between the teacher and artist prior to the

The artists found that many teachers experienced difficulty in clearly articulating their curriculum objective in the course of the pre-classroom activity teacher/artist dialogue.

Another A/R activity, primarily in the third year, was the presentation of Workshop productions.

These were developed

in response to suggestions from the teachers; were of 10 to 40 minutes duration; and were scheduled in the classroom at the teacher's request.

Four productions were made available

and given 70 presentations-as follows:

Juliet and Nurse

scene from Romeo and Juliet (17 performances); the Shepherd scene from Aria dajlaze (20); excerpts from Spoon ..River An-

thology (24); and a Japanese Nob play (9).

Orientation and In-Service Train tris

All feedbackinformation confirmed that the coordinator was the key person in the schools.

The districts that had'

the most successful experiences were those that gave a highpriority to the, duties of the BCC, and where he was a Derson

who understood the plade of the humanities and arts in the curriculum.

Finding the first year that teacher attitudes presented the moat serious constraint on the program and that the BCCs were not uniformly successful as catalysts, an in-service teacher training

course was offered in the fall and spring

of the second year (Encl. in-evaluation summary).

In thd third yeE,, seeking further ways to inford teachers

of PACE; goals and methods, Saturday Workshops were inLatuted;

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ohe for Bath and Science teachars and one for English and Social Studies teachers ,(two from each district were invited

to attend anc paid by PACE).

One follow-up teacher interview

(Encl. 48) and end of session comments indicated to the staff

that in almost every case the teacheis present gained insight into the PACE 2'a /R concept and how it could be applied' in

their subject area.

Many stated that they would make a point

of informing other teachers in their departments of the value of thii concept as a unique teaching tool.

Related to Total Project Costa Totai operational grant expenditure: ESEI Title- III

1967-68 1968-69 1969-70

.$288,607.00 230,007.00 '185 oqp.00

$704,494.00

School Districts 1960-69 1969-70

BCC & District Coordinators "

Tees

(In dollars or services in kind)

Performing .:rts Foundaticin

1967-68 '1968-69

1969-70

$ 12,000.00 15,239.00 5,000.00* 32 239.00

TOTAL

*

$736,733.00

PIT leased $20,-500. worth of theatrical and office equtpment to PACE OS1.00. a - .11. ...1..11.1.~411...1,

After three years of federal seed funding, the chief school officers in all 8 participbting districts confirmed their commitment

to the program.

Three Boards of Education in-

cluded a-line item of $15,000. in their budgets for next year,two districts have made more modest committents,

and one

district is giing serious thought to the projeCt and seeking

720funds.

In the last two di.stricts, one hap had no continuity

of administrative leadership in the past four years due to constant changes. in personnel, creating difficulty in clear

communication of PACE objectives, and the other will not consider any new program because o2 severe fiscal problems. The parochial school complex, despite its financial crisis, has expressed eagerness to participate in the performances and is considering ;raising additional funds for the MR program. PAP's experience in re the adult box office demonstrates

that this community is no different from most--less than 4% of

community attend the nerforming arts.

office attracted less than 4% because:

The PAP box

1) the community has

'to be educated to accept the concept that a parallel theatre

program or students and adults can create excellence, and 2) that theatre eaual to Broadway standards'can be enjoyed. outside of Hew York City. PAP's strength was demonstrated by the committ:Alt

of the

Board of Trustees Who, when the box office failed to yield

sufficient support,-made personal contributions to hire a professional fund raiser.

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CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS 1.

Outcomes The validity of PACE and its success in implementing 'a

plan for the performing arts to become an integral part of the currieillum is 'attested to by the following: a.

At the end of 3 years all 0 superintendents attested to the validity of the :program.

b.

Thee° of the original C districts placed a line item of $15,000: in their budgets for an A/R program'and two districts have made more modest commitments.

c.

A summary of selected k/R classroom experiOnces (Sncl. 414) and the increasing demand for the A/R :by teachers, illus.iraten the beginning of success in defining the role of performing artist in the school community and the finding of appropriate ways of relating the art forms to all 'curriculum areas.

d.

BOCES III, in the 2nd and 3rd years, broadened the scope of the program under- go aegis of a Humanities and Parts Program, offering Pilot Programs to its 10 additional districtn.- Six of these districts in Babylon and nmithtown Townships incorporated this program using local sdhool funds.

e.

Under the BOCES Humanities anei Arts Program, a pilot elementary program was established, through which we were able to provide 5 districts with both performance and A/R. This was made possible at a considerable savings to the districts through our ability to sign a quality professional dhildrens' theatre company for a 10 week contract. Via were able to provide orientation for A/n work to these actors and in turn received from them their response to our program.

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f.

Ono school district outside o2 the BOCES III area has committed funds for participation in the program as a result of knowledge gained from the dissemination of information about PACE. Several other districts in Suffolk and Nassau Counties are considering participation as this report is submitted.

g.

PACE and PAP have established the validity of a Parallel student/adult program for the artist by attracting and retainIng performers of excellence, while acknowledging that considerably more teachdetraining an(:' adult audience development are necessary for complete success.

-22-

.

The pronimity of this community to New York City has given PAP the advantages of being able to draw on an enormous pool of talent (who can commute if they so choose); and of working in a community with a high level of soph'istication and commitment% to education. Conversely, we have faced the disadvantages of having to compete with New York professional standards an of dealing with artists generally reluctant to move from the city and, therefore, subject to all the hazzards of commuting. The nrcrolems will vary from one community to another, but the advantages that aided the program in this community do not-negate the premise that a similar program can be done anywhere.

2.

Peaturep. of Original. plan Dropped or ,Modified

a. Responding to feedback from the schools and because of lack of significant-box effice.support from the adult -community at eveningAoerformances, PACE modified the number of fully staged productions s-and increased the hours of WA classroom activity.

b. At the request of the teachers and as a response to the needs of the actors, Ntrkshop Productions for classroom presentation were offered on a larger scale in the final. year. C. Evaluation procedures were modified the last year in two respects: 1) Feedback sheets for performances were dropped and replaced by notation of attendance figures; 2) Feedback forms for A/R classroom work were replaced by in-depth interviews with selected teachers by an evaluation c.onsultant. d. After the first two years the PAP Dance Ensemble was dropped *because of: .

1) lack of sufficient fiscal support from the adult community at the bar: office; and 2) conflict over_priorities between the desire of the dance company to attract national recognition and the PACE concept of concentrating time, money and effort on developing the role of the performing artist in the classroom.

e. Compulsory free attendance at performance was dropped, and in the last year students were given the choice of attend= ing or not at a small fee (thus demonstrating their commitment% to and interest in the program).

al*

-233. 4.

Recommendations for Others miett-Sirailar Needs...and Succer.T.gul Irplementillion of Projects RequV:eilents

for Kest

I

a. na.111.1.12

The strength that this program has demonstrated is due in considerablb measure-to the interaction between nrofessional artists and, educator: in the planning phase. The distinctions between the functions of each must be understood: the educator must contribute his knowledge of the broad curriculum areas and his understanding of the emotional and intellectual level of the students, while reserving-for thetprofessional artist the perogativo of determining the final decisions on programs.

b. fleeting the Needs of AilPartA4pants A clear. understanding of how the arts function in meeting the needs of both the schools and the artists is vital. In the A/R role, the artist utilizes his art form as a tool for the teacher end he must not assume the- role of the teacher. In performance, uhile meeting an educational need, the artist fulfills his own need for participation in the art formand if the latter.is ignored or belittled the aesthetic excellence of the program will suffer. c. Hanagoraent PACE enperience has -daffiOnstrated that the -comnleNities

of this program call for the producing and managihg services of a_-professional performing arts agency. Such an organination, when firily committed to thd educational program as well-as to the' community, is uniquely able to: 1) reflect the needa of the community.(Mncl. 09) and 2) invest the time.. and effort required to disseminatd information concerning the program (Encl. 010). d. Personnel -in

Schools

42.11"*.-

The most successful implementation of the program can occur only where there is an- effective coordinator in the school building. The school personnel who have boon acting as BCCs for PACE have not had sufficient time for the task an, have not uniformly had sufficient understandifig of, and commitment. to- PACE Objectives and priorities. Therefore, we recommend utilizing the-full time services of either/or both performing artists or School personnel as catalyst-coordinators, and stress the importance of orientation and in- service training. e. Sunnort From the State

Where active support from the state education department can be obtained (the establidhment of the Humanities and Arts Division of the MI% State Education Dept. fostered greater emphesis on the humanities and arts in the schools and coincided with the development of the PACE Project) this assistance can be a significant factor for Success.

-26-

PARTICIPATING SCHOOL' DISTRICTS

Free pchool.District fJ1.

Elwood

Dr. James H. Boyd, Superintendent

Cold

pprine, Harbor

Cchool District O.

Dr. Katthew W. Gaffney, Superintendent

BuRtingtce.-unkoli Pre. School Mr. William PC Keough, Jr.,

J.

PreaSchoolpi.pArict

Northport Dr.

Superintendent

Bernhard M.

Schneider,

Superintendent

Half pollpy Hills Central fjchpol

A.

Mr. Coleman R. Lyons, Superintendent Harborfieldp.::

Central

School.

District # 6.

14r. Thomas J. Lahey, District Principal

Commis .7_11:pion pros

School p.isArict.

Dr. flosc Headley, Superintendent

EaRth Huntington

uniten PYPe

PA15:91.PistkipA

Mr. Charles Connell, Superintendent

Parochial s.c110.5±14.

St. Lnthony of Padua School Christ the King School St. Hugh of Lincoln Coindre Hall BOarding School St. Patrick's Parochial School Holy Family High School , St: Philip Heri School

-25-

PACE PERSONNEL

Board of C000erative Educational. Services Third Supervisory District of Suffolk County "...

Dr. Gordon A. Wheaton, District Superintehdent Fit. James Womack, Assistant District Superintendent Clint:Marantz,- Project Direct-or

Mr. Larry Forde, Producing Director Mrs. 'Ruth D'Onofrio, Assistant Producing Director Mrs. Kas Bendiner, Evaluation Consultant

District PACE pupervisors Elwood Cold S;ring Harbor Huntington Northport Half Hollow Hills Harborgields Commack South Huntington -

UFSD CSD UFSD UFSD CSD CSD UFSD UFSD

01 02 03 05 46 010 *13

Mr. John. J. Douksza* Er. Zale George Mr. Rufus Kern Robert W. Krueger Mr. Frank Roach Mr. Thomas Dight Donald P. Sites Fir. Leonard Aciriance

* Chairman, Steering Committee

Enclosure

1

Performances 1967-68

Dance

r--Ethnic Dance - Bhaskar & Rivera - police of Two Wort& Primitive Dance - Dinizulu African Dance Co. Contemporary Dance - PAF Dance Ensemble, Richard Englund, Director Ballet - PAF Dance Ensemble, Richard Englund, Director -

Music

Theatre

Orchestra da Camera - Clayton Westerman, Conductor Marian McPartland Jazz Quartet Folk Singer - Norris O'Neill Composer-in-Residence, Herbert- Deutsch - "Mu gigue Concrete' (a composition made from the sounds of an ordinary school day) -Mime Theatre - Tony i!ontanaro & Michael Henry Readers' Theatre - Julie Harris - Poems & Letters of Emily Dickinson Fcntastics - PAF Resident Acting Co., Tony Tanner, Director The Diary of Anne Frank - PAF Resident Acting Co., Del Hughes, Director

1968-69

Dance

Dance Has Many Faces - PAF Dance Ensemble, Richard Englund, Director Dance From the Curriculum - (same) Dance From the Repertory - (same)

Music

Piano Recital - Lawrence Smith Marian McPartland Jazz Quartet Orchestra da Camera - Marian McPartland, piano soloist Lawrence Smith, Conductor

Theatre

Our Town - PAF Resident Acting Co., Larry Porde, Director Kabuki Theatre - Miss layoko Watnabe Readers' Theatre - Whitman 150, PAF Resident Acting Co. Larry Fordo, Director The Believers, combination of dance, music & theatre, Produ:.sed by Voices, Inc.

( 1969 -70.

Dance

Rod Rogers Modern Dance Co.

Music

Marian Mc?artland, pianist & Michael Moore, bass (small group recitals) Herbert Deutsch, composer-in-residenceMINIMA An African Tale of the Creation (interactions for chorus, percussion ensemble, flute and audience)

Theatre

Inherit the Wind - Resident Acting Co., Larry Forde, Director Ernest in Love - Redident Acting Co., Larry Forde, Director (Musical adaptation of Oscar Wilde's "The Importance of Being Earnest")

Workshop Productions Aria da Capo - Shepherd scene Romeo & Juliet - Juliet & Nurse scene Spoon River Anthology - Excerpts A Japanese Nob play

PACE Information She at 4P?

Enclosure # 2

SCHOOL DISTRICT PERSONNEL

District Humanities and Arts Coordinators a.

SerVe on the BOCES Humanities and Arts Steering Committee which determines all policy and programs for the school year - rep.resenting the office of the district chief school officet.

b.

Coordinate-the services rendered by the BOCES Humanities and Arts Program with his district's Humanities and Arts program.

Building Humanities and Arts Coordinators a.

Encourage and foster the use-of the A/R in the classroom.

b.

Develop with staff and students possibilities for artists Workshop productions that will fulfill the particular needs and interest of his school.'

c.

Distribute information about the A/R program and productions and arrange, displays.

d.

Schedule performances for his school for all productions.

e.

Structure ticket sales procedure for performances.

f.

Order'tickets and buses for performances from BOCES Humanities and Arts office.

g.

Recommend those teachers who could meaningfully participate in, humanities and arts workshops.

_h.

Recommend teachers to serve on BOCES Performing Arts Curriculum-dommittees.

Enclosure # 3

BOLES PACE Project FEEDBACK

School

f"---

Performance

(Please return within 24 hours of the last performance to PACE, 1328 New York Avenue, Huntington Station, N.Y., 11746. Additional comments may be added on the back of this sheet.)

Escellent 1.

Program content:

2.

Quality of performance:

3.

Audience (student) reaction: 7th grade 8th grade 9th grade

4.

Audience (teacher) reaction:
5.

Reaction to printed program's: 7th grade 8th grade 9th grade

6.

Artist available at lunch:

Very Good

Yes

a) If yes, number of teachers involved:

b) If yes, number of students involved:

Good

Fair

Poor

Page 2

7.

Artist available for pre- or post- performance activity:

Yes

No

a) If yes, numbek of teacher:, involved:

b) If yes, number of-students involved: c) Nature of activity:

8.

Performances: 1st on time, 2nd cni time; 3rd on time,

(onstage, in what class, in auditorium, etcc.)

minutes early, minutes late, minutes early, .C.L.minutes late, minutes early-, minutes late,

running time. running time. running time.

Reason, if performance was late: 0111111,

9.

Students bussed:

40.111M.MMAININIMM

Yes

No

10.

Tech problems:

11.

Related student activity: (Library display, posters, class projects, stage crew activities, class discussion, etc., either before or after performance)

Page 3

12.

Absentee figures: 3 days.) before.) program)

Dzy of performance

3 days )

after

)

program).

Zlnuscal weather conditions or any other event of significance to attenderce figures:

13.

ComMents: (Faculty and/or student reaction necessary) .

use other side of

BOOS HI, SUFFOLK COUNTY

HUMANITIES AND ARTS PROGRAM Artistin-Residence Project Report

Artist School

'1

Sub

Beginning Date

Grade

Curriculum Objectives:

Techniques:

Procedure:

(Write on beck if more space needed)

Concluding Date

SOCES In, UMW( COUNTY

HUMANITIES AND ARTS PROGRAM Anecdotal Itoporf Please report any anecdote related to the Humanities and Arts Program whether it be positive or negative which is illustrative of the reactions of students, faculty, administration, parents Of the community in general. Date Recorder Address

Subject

BOARD'OF COOPERATIVE EDUCATIONAL SERVICES

Humanities and Arts Program

Teadher

School

A-R

Grade

Protect Evaluation

Subject Date Started

Ended

Curriculum Objective:

1.

Do you feel that you had effective dialogue with the A-R? Describe:

2.

Describe your activity during the project.

3.

Did the students help in planning or carrying-out the project? Describe:

Did the student involvement include physical, verbal and/or sensory activity? Describe:

5.

How many students took part in the project?

6.

Do you feel that the students obtained clarification of the curriculum matter? What percentage of students? Was the clarification partial? Optimum?

7.

How was this demonstrated? Tests? Discussion? this experience to another? Other?

S.

Describe the type of student that received the most benefit?

Relating

-29.

Do you feel that any change has taken place in your students as a result of this experience?

10.- Did you. and / or the students "catch" from the A-R any feeling of: Involvement? Excitement? Enjoyment?

Boredom?

11.

Describe the students' reaction to the project.

12.

Did this experience suggest to you any new approach or any new technique that you will carry out yourself?

13.

Do you feel that the A-R used his particular skills in an appropriate manner?

************* Comments:

Artist-in-Residence Techniques

Acting Movement Modeling Dance Improvisation Voice production

Role Playing 4.* Aesthetics of life Directing Physical techniques Analysis Theatre history Sensory awareness Personality Play structuring Memorization techn.Emotional involvement Stage technique

(This list of questions is to be used by the evaluator as a guide line only.)

3.

BOARD OF COOPERATIVE EDUCATIONAL. SERVICES THIRD SUPERVISORY DISTRICT OF SUFFOLK COUNTY DECR PARK RD. (DIX HILLS, HUNTINGTON. N.Y. 11743

GORDON A. WHEATON. DISTRICT SUPERINTENDENT

SURVEY OF IN-SERVICE COURSE

Course Title: Instructor: Date:

Now that you have completed the above named course, we would appreciate your brief reaction and evaluation. Your comments will be helpful to us in determining our future offerings of this and similar courses. Please take a few moments to complete the following and return this form in the attached envelope to your instructor. Thank you for your assistance.

Evaluation of In-Service Course

Date:

I am enrolled in Course Title

I am generally satisfied D dissatisfied Z:7 with the course. After having taken the course, I would recommend it J7 -- I would not recommend it 0 to other teachers. I am particularly pleased with

am displeased with

In planning future courses, I suggest

The specific courses (please list) I think should be offered are:

Enclosure * 4 FEEDBACK ANALYSIS -

'Summaries, - of all schools to all productions (See Appendix 1 for raw data, compiled from feedback summaries for 0E10 roduction) Keys

EX - excellent; VG - very good; G - good; F - fair; P - podi. Figures express percentages.

EX-VG

G

F-P

1.

Program content

.82

.09

.09

2.

Quality of Performance

.91

.07

.03

3.

Student reaction Average of 7-9 grade

.80

.13

.07

7th grade

.74

.17

.09

8th grade

.78

.13

.08

9th grade

.86

.08

.07

Total staff

.181

.11

.07

Experimentally oriented

.88

.06

.05

Structurally oriented

.74

.16

.10

Arts oriented

.87

.09

.04

Non-arts oriented

.80

.10

AO

Administration

.81

.13

.06

.63

.27

.10

4.

Teacher reaction 4 V

5.

Student reaction to printed.

program

e

APPENDIX 1.

SUMARIES OP ALL PEEDBACK SHEETS PAOLI BCC's (Raw Data)

Items considered: 1.

Program content

2.

Quality of performance - 1st performance, 2nd performance, 3rd performance, average of all performances

3.

Student reaction to performance - 7th.grade, Oth grade, 9th grade, 7-9 average

4.

Teacher reaction to performances - experimentally-oritneted, str'acturally oriented, arts oriented, non-arts oriented, administration, staff averages

5.

Student reaction to printed program - 7th grade, 0th grade., 9th grade, 7-9 averages

Noy to all tables: Et - excellent; VG - very good; G-- good; P - fair; P - poor; 0 - omitted item (where pertinent) Notes:

re 0 - omitted items; and other affective considerations

Six schools did not attend Looking at Dance due to bussing and scheduling difficulties (Tables 1, 2, 3) Eight schools did not attend Spring Dance a teacher strike tied up temporarily the auditorium in which the students were to be bussed. (Tables 1, 2, 3, 4, 6) 0 is not relevant for Table 2. All schools ideally saw one performance; however, auditorium size sometimes dictated a 2nd and 3rd performance in order to accommodate student body (Table 2)

7 of the O parochial schools did not.have 9th grade classes; one had 9th grade, but not 7th and 3th. This accounts for high number of "0" items in Table 3.

When students were bussed to a performance (partially in Looking at Dance, all students for Anne Prank and Spring Dance), the BCC had difficulty in knowing which grade was which-in a foreign-seating set-up, making grade level breakdown for reportage inaccurate. (Table 3) The categories under teacher reaction (Table 4) could overlap. Hopefully, this was taken into account in the reportage. Two parochial schools developed the idea that their feedback was included in the report of their host school.

DCCs occasionally neglected to return feedback or filled it in perfunctorliy, omitting some items.

Fantasticks

Dances - 2 Worlds

J. Harris

Orchestra

9

12

10

19

15

7

5

20

EX

3

5

5

7

1

5

5

9

3

VG

3

0

2

0

3

2

1

3

5

0

G

0

5

0

2

2

0

0

0

3

3

0

F

5

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

1

0

P

(42)

17

3

2

4

3

2

3

3

0

0

0

SURWARY - PROGRAM CONTENT

Dinizulu

13

2

1

14

.02

1.

cPartland

0

1

20

.07

ime

O'Neill

4

46

.09

t

Spring Dance

12G

.22

TOTALS

Diary of A.F.

Look at Dance

Percentage(based on 211 of an ideal 253 responses) .G0

APPENDIX 1 - 2

I

Looking at Dance

cPartland

Dinizulu

Fantasticks

Dances - Two Worlds

Julie aarris

Orchestra

Mime

9

9

15

12

20

1G

10

10

20

2

0

4

3

6

1

3

2

9

2

0

4

1

4

1

2

0

2

1

1

0

0

4

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

2

0

1st Performance EX VG G F

0

1

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

P

(44)

17

3

5

5

3

3

2

2

2

1

1

0

64

0

3

13

'3

0

5

G

G

G

4

10

22

0

2

4

1

3

4

2

3

2

1

0

4

0

1

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

3

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

2nd Performance EX VG G F

2

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

P

21

0

1

10

0

2

1

1

2

2

0

2

10

0

1

4

1

0

1

1

1

0

1

0

3

0

0

1

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

3rd Performance EX VG G F

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

P

APPENDIX 1 - 3

Diary of Anne Frank 9

3

2

SUL11ARY - QUALITY OF PERFORMANCE

O'Neill

3

7

2.

Spring Dance

16

.30 .09 .00 .00

43

.G1

141

.24 .04 .03 .02

TOTALS

.G0

.20 .07 .03 .01

.02 .01

.69

.25 .07

Percentage (based on 189 responses of ideal 253)

% of ALL PERFORMANCES -

0

-

Orchestra

13

5

3

17

4

12

6

,J

3

3

3

0

5

8

1

7th grade VG G

0

2

0

1

0

5

2

0

F

0

1

0

0

0

0

2

2

0

P

4

5

5

4

2

2

2

-

0

2

0

2

6

13

3

7

3

15

15

5

3

19

0

6

4

1

5

1G

4

3

5

5

4

3

3

1

2

3

1

2

0

3

7

0

0th grade EX VG G

0

1

0

0

1

1

0

0

4

4

0

F

0

1

0

1

1

0

0

0

1

1

0

P

10

6

5

16

6

3

2

5

5

3

-

0

77

1

6

10

0

6

9

12

11

5

3

14

47

1

4

4

1

4

10

2

12

2

7

0

11.

0

0

1

1

2

2

0

0

3

2

0

9th grade EX VG G

5

1

1

0

0

1

0

0

0

1

1

0

F

0(113)

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

P

20

12

0

21

10

-

2

9

12

10

9

0

APPENDIX 1 - 4

J. Harris

13 15

4

0

2

19

(63)

SUNUALY - STUDENT REACTION

Dances - Two Worlds

7

4- 4

7

1

3

0

5

3.

Fantasticks

9 8

4

0

11

EX

Look at Dance 9 7

3

25

Rime

Diary of A. F. 3

0

53

AcPartland

n

O'Neill 1

96

Dinizulu

,Spring Dance

(37)

.07 .00

7

.08

13

.53 .33

36

.28 .11 .06 .02

74

.34 .17 .06 .03

.50

06

Percentage (based on 216 of an ideal 253 .40 responding)

.32 .13 .0G .01

TOTALS

.40

(E:cpl. 0)

of 7-9 Aveiage

Note:

4.

APPIAIDIX 1 - 5

SUMMARY - TEACHERS REACTION TO PERFORU1 NC3S

11

8

4

14

3

0

0

3

2

2

0

1

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

5

1

3

5

6

9

G

1

12

2

3

4

4

2

2

0

G

2

0

0

4

4

2

3

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

1

1

0

0

0

1

0

1

0

0

1

0

7

1

6

9

7

11

11

5

13

2

2

3

3

3

1

0

3

1

0

0

4

1

0

1

2

1

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

Arts-Oriented VG G F

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

P

Fantasticks

Diary of A.F.

O'Neill

0

0

2

1

1

0

2

0

2

5

0

2

76

1

5

21

,1

2

10

0

1

2

0

1

4

0

2

ob

.09 .01 .03

5

.69 .18

17

.05 .05

27

AG

50

.26

2

.40

3

EX

8 6 0

0

0

Structurally-Oriented EX VG G F P

Orchestra

5 3

0

0

Experimentally-Orientee EX VG G F P

J. Harris

6 2

0

2

ilime

Dinizulu

1 2

1

Dances - 2 Worlds

HcPartland

G 2

1

"

Look' at Dance

3

0.

0

6

1

Spring Dance

G4 .G4

.24 .06 .03 .02

24

0

TOTALS:

PERCENTAGES

0

0 2

0

0

0

0

P

7

6

G

15

TV.?

5

0

2

2

VG

1

3

1

0

1

G

0

0

2

1

0

F

0

0

0

1

0

P

APPENDIX 1 -

2

1 0 0

3

0

Hon-Arts Oriented.

14

4 2

0

0 ,,

0

Administrator VG G F

4 0 3

0

3

EX

Orchestra 6 1

0

4

Rime

J. Harris 3 0

7

Dances 1- 2 :Worlds 3

0

7

0

0

Fantasticks 3

1

1

3

6

4

Dinizulu

5

2

0

4

0

5

2

cPartland

1

0

0

0

4

2

2

2

1

Look' at Dance

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

2

6

4

5

Diary of A.F.

2

2

1

2

2

2

1

1

0

1

3

0

Spring Dance

O'Neill

0

29

0

0

65

0

1

3

0

0

3

5

13

7

22

.60 '.21 .13 .03 .03

.55

TOTALS:

PERCENTAGES

EX

VG G F P .23 .11 .04 .03

Percentage of Total Staff Reaction

.59

.25 .10 .06 .04

61

13

L.

APP3NDIA' 1 - 7

\--''Look at Dance

McPartland

Dinizulu

Fantazticks

Dance - 2 Worlds

J. Harris

Orchestra

lame

1

4

7

G

G

4

3

G

2

0

4

5

7.

14

6

4

8

0

5

3

5

4

2

1

8

7

6

7th grade VG EX G

0

1

0

2

1

5

1

0

3

5

0

F

0

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

2

0

P

1

3

G

1

3

0

G

G

4

3

G

1

4

3

5

5

5

7

13

G

2

12

3

G

4

4

4

6

1

1

.4

.-.

G

3

0th grade EX VG G

13

0

2

0

2

1

5

1

0

1

6

0

F

4

0

1

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

2

0

P

30

1

1

2

1

2

9

3

3

3

2

3

EX

43

0

5

4

4

4

5

4

6

4

3

9

31

0

3

3

2

3

6

3

1

3

5

2

9th grade VG G

5

0

1

0

2

0

0

0

0

1

1

0

F

2

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

1

0

P

SUMARY - STUDENT REACTION TO PRINTED PROGRAiI

Diary of A.F. 5

4

3

46

G.

O'Neill

3

1

63

(....\

Spring Dance

0

47

TOTALS

4

.2G

.27 .04 .02

10

.35 .29 .09 .02

.41

52 .25

.37 .27 .00 .02

.26

G3

% OF TOTAL

.26

.35 .26 .10 .02

45

% of 7-9 Stud. Reaction to printed program

41

BCC FEEDBACK COMPILATION

Total 1968 - 1969 Program 132 reports

151 performances

Excel- Very lent

Good

Good. Fair

Poor

I.

Program content:

42

41

27

14

2

2.

Quality of performance:

70

39

22

9

3

3.

Audience (student) reaction: 7th grade 8th grade 9th grade

22 19 17

30 33 26

28 27 14

31 29

3 3

36 30 29 32

27 23

18 27 15 16 14

9 11

44

29 26 36

10

5 3 5 2

5

4

11 16

30 27

2

13

13

32 31 20

6 8 4

4.

5.

Audience (teacher) reaction: Experimentally oriented: Structurally oriented: Arts oriented: Non-arts oriented: Administrator: Reaction to printed programs: 7th grade 8th grade 9th grade

No

13

9 14

6.

Artist available for lunch: Yes 22 If yes, number of teachers involved: a) If yes, number of studenti involved: b)

7.

Artist available for pre- or post-performance activity: No 59 Yes 27 101 If yds, number of teachers involved: a) 2535 b) If yes, number of students involved:

8.

Performances: 97 on time. 1st:

9.

Yes

None

60 97 107

3 very late; 21, 5 to 10.

Minutes late:

Students bussed:

4

29

No

75

School equipment at fault 10

10.

Tech problems:

11.

Related student activity:

12.

Absentee figures: 49 reports (out of 132 Feedback Sheets) .045 Day of performance: .044 3 days before & after: (3 unusual conditions) (6 unusual conditions)

83

(See program Feedback Compilations)

enclosure

b

5

The Assembly grogram Trap The Planning Committee's task of designing a program to fit the new concepts of PACE required the surveying of a large area in the performing arts and the researching of all that had previously been done. The committee recommended that a series of experiences 33e

offered in each area, and stated specifically what each seauence should include (in music:-a folk singer, jazz concert, orchestra concert;

in dance:-ethnic, primitive, modern and ballet;

in

theatre: - readers' theatre, drama, musical).

The staff has searched out and brought to Huntington excellent performers in each category, but has found that the "assembly program" trap has sprung.

To cite several examples:

The East Indian, Shaskar, a dancer with a deservedly fine reputation, presented a program of dance illustrative ox Asian culture--but art is not, in essence, illustrative. The nrimitive dance program, by Dinizulu, was found to be too obviously riding the current wave of the Black arts. The Orchestra da Camera, an excellent chamber group, performed symphonic music suitable for the age group--but the experience lost the quality of art through the necessary adaptations of musical literature written for a full-scale orchestca.

Marian McPartland, one of th foremost names in jazz, was placed in the untenable position of .denying her art form by having to perform in large auditoriums for large audiences. Solo jazz is an intimate art form, and in the third year when she was allowed to play for small groups only, the students gained understanding of the art and of her excellence. Two readers' theatre programs have been presented. The first, Julie Harris reading the poetry and letters of Emily Dickinson, was successfulbut essentially because Julie Harris was able to bring to her performance the magic that only a great star can project. In contrast, the program Whitman 150, readers' theatre especially designed for and

pertinent to this community, using several voices, visuals and music, was an exciting an valid work of art though it was not performed by a cast of star quality. The Be.lieyers, an off-Broadway show very well reviewed in New York City, was scheduled. Thny brought to PACE an inferior ?roduction which they thought "good enough for kids" in place of the condensation of the New York show which had been promised. After the program was rewritten an& restaged it was artistically more valid, but was finally cancelled due to a second problem - -the lack of consideration and commitment of the cast. To summarize:

PACE experience has demonstrated that 40

minute auditorium presentations by artists brought in on a short term basis and having no commitment to the project, no matter how excellently performed or how imaginatively staged, run the danger of degenerating into "assembly programs" -- and such programs are,by their very nature,not essentially art.

This pitfall can best be avoided by following the recOimiendation (page 23) of reserving for the professional artistic staff the perogative of final decision on the selection of programs

to serve the needs of the general curriculum areas spelled out by the educators.

Board

Of Enclosure* 6

Cooperative Educational Services

GORDON A. WHEATON, DISTRICT SUPERINTENDENT

THIRD SUPERVISORY DISTRICT OF SUFFOLK COUNTY

Clint Marantz, Program Director Larry Fordo, Director Resident Artist Company

HUMANITIES AND ARTS PROGRAM

1328 New York Avenue Huntington Station, N.Y. 11746 (516) 271.3633

January 5, 1970

Information Sheet #3

RESIDENT ARTIST CLASSROOM ACTIVITY

The primary purpose of the artist-in-residence aspect of the program is to find ways to infuse the humanities and arts, into the curriculum, not as a separate field of endeavor, but as an integral part of the school experience. .

The examples given here illustrate the basic premise that the A/R is a tool offered to the teacher to enable him to clarify, extend and reinforce curriculum material. In the following reports, the curriculum objective, the technique agreed upon by-the A/R and the the classroom, are teacher, and the procedure used all stated. The evaluation, in all cases, consists of the teachers comments, obtained in the course of an interview conducted by the PACE evaluator soon after the experience. Out of approximately 60 interviews conducted in November and December, fewer than 6 experiences were reported as unsuccessful by the classroom teacher.

AB.

Information Sheet #3

- 2

The 15 experiences described below seem to demonstrate that: 1.

the A/R is a positive factor in motivating students in classroom activity,

2.

the shy pupil and slow learner often "come alive",

3.

the brighter student and the "tight", repressed child tend to looden up, and

4.

in some cases the presence of the professional performer is the ingredient of the experience that makes it succeed- but, in many instances, teachers report that they have learned a new technique which they can incorporate into their own teaching.

Toward the end of the school year, a bulletin will be issued containing many more examplei of the artist-in-residence activity.

.

- 3 -

Information Sheet #3 10

ALR2919r

Reading & Study Skills Objective:

To effect attitudinal change toward the relative importance of organization and structure to achieve a goal.

Technique:

Model

Procedure:

As part of an exercise on planning a trip, teacher introduced AIR as a representative of a travel bureau who was present to discuss professional trip planning with them. A/R played the role in a state of total disorganization (coming late, dropping papers, losing glasses, presenting material in wrong order) and then left-the room. Teacher led class discussion of how this lack of organization made it more difficult for them to plan the trip. He didn't identify the A/R until the next day.

Evaluation:

Students were so sympathetic to the "representative" that they worried about his losing his job, and wanted to find a way to help him. Teacher reported complete success with class, and that he will introduce technique of roleplaying into other situations'in his room.

*** ALL Actor

Science Objectives

To demonstrate and clarify the difference betweei interpretations and observations.

Technique

Model

Procedure:

A/R did pantomime of eating his breakfast. Teacher then led class discussion, analyzing observation vs. interpretation of the actions (Did he "drink coffee" or did he "lift a cup to his mouth"?).

Evaluation:

Students all absorbed and involved in discussing qualitative differences. "I would like to see more of this type of activity...students are so TV and film oriented that they need this humanizing experience...an A/R is alive - -they can communicate with him."

- 4

Information Sheet #3

A/R Actor

English Objective:

To change student attitudes toward those who are "different" through increased involvment in the emotions illustratJd in the story "The New Kid ".

Technique:

Improvisation

Procedure:

At the teacher's suggestion, A/R read the story before coming to class. He explained improvisation technique to the students and directed part of the class in an improvisation based on the story.

Evaluation:

Teacher was surprised that students incorporated many lines from the story in their improvisation, and that students not acting were so involved that they were mouthing lines as they watched. Teacher has since noticed that students are much kinder to a newcomer who has a foreign accent, and that the more out-going students now say "Hi" to the quiet ones. Feeling unsure of herself in drama, and not familiar with this technique, teacher feels that she will now be able to make use of improvisation in her teaching after...having observed the A/R.

*** Science

ALL Actor

Objective:

To clarify the process of photosynthesis.

Technique:

Direction,of role-playing by students.

Procedure:

Teacher and A/R prepared cards indentifying the chemicals involved in the process and assigned students to play these roles. The teacher elicited the science facts from the students as the A/R assisted them in playing the roles appropriately.

Evaluation:

Majority of the class demonstrated, 4 days later, the ability to use this information in answering questions on partially-related subject matter.

Teacher has since introduced this technique in his other classes himself-successfully.

- 5 -

Information Sheet 03

all Actor

Social_ Studies

Objective:

To involve the students in the study of the Iroquois creation myth with the maximum degree of realism and emotional impact.

Technique:

Reading

Procedure:

A/R first read a biblical creation story (James Weldon Johnson) to class, then, with students sitting in circle on floor,. Indian fashion, he read the Iroquois creation myth. (Project done in 5 classes, ranging from slow to honors.)

Evaluation:

100% of students interested and involved. All students demonstrated enormous recall from experience--and talked about it for 2 weeks.

xla

"On the basis of the fine recall shown by the slow students, 1 begin to question the validity of /.() tests -- perhaps this test is only measur-

ing reading skills!"

*** General Music

A/R Singer -Actor

Objective:

To infuse confidence in a class of "failures", in preparation for tr:Ar work on a one-act musical production.

Technique:

Personality

Procedure:

This, the fin.- of several planned sessions with AIR, was "get to know the performer" day to impart the feeling that a professional performer is a human being, even as they. A/R discussed her life as a professional singer-actor, including difficulties, frustrations, and successes. 1 free discussion followed, guided by the teacher.

Evaluation:

"A very good, strong, z,uccessful experience. The kids were stupified that a 'real' actor would come to them and converse with them. They can't believe what is happenings"

- 6

Information Sheet #3

A/R Actor

Art (Sculpture) Objective:

To demonstrate and clarify many different concepts of space.

Technique:

Sensory and physical awareness

Procedure:

A/R introduced a series of sensory games and physical activities, involving rebound in space, definition of space with arm motir'rs, holding and passing imaginary objects, eta.

Evaluation: "By the end,100% of students were interested and involved, even the shyest. The new techniques the A/R. brought tied in with my previous discussion of certain modern dance techniques and my attempts to help them understand their environment:

*

A/R Actor

English Objective:

To extend understanding of character development in the short story.

Technique:

Model

Procedure:

Actor first mimed a series of actions (brushing teeth) with as little character as possible and then with strong characterization. Had students do similar exercise.

Improvisation, Role-playing

A/R and students did scenes from stories written by pupils, doing improvisations of the same scenes twice/developing different characterizations and relationships, demonstrating how little character delineation the story itself had supplied. Evaluation:

A/R very successful with this somewhat repressed group--they talked about the experience a great dr,ml and requested his return. Students were enthusiastic and, as a result of this session, were a little friendlier. Most students understood the need for Strong characterization thereafter.

- 7

Information Sheet #3

FIR Actor

Mathematics Objective:

To clarify and reinforce the understanding of adding and subtracting positive and negative integers (slow-average class).

Technique:

Model

Procedure:

A/R made several suggestions for project and teacher chose the one he felt was most appropriate. A/R drew a number lihe on floor and, as each student wrote a problem on the board, A/R moved on the line to act out the answer-student deciding if she was correct.

Evaluation: "Majority of class obtained the desired clarification. Class was well-behaved--an achievement! The presence and technique of the A/R were invaluable. This is a very humanizing, valuable rl experience!'

*** English

A/R Actor & Dancers

Objective:

To stimulate interest in poetry.

Technique:

Readers Theatre, Directing, Modeling

Procedure:

Teacher and actor, wcrking as a team, directed students in making a tape. Teacher and actor read poem to an accompaniment of students using words as music. Actor brought dancers in to direct students in movement improvisation and suggested that students set up lights to help create mood--bringing many media to the presentation of poetry.

Evaluation:

"Some of the slower students have started writing Poetry and dramatic sketches, and some of the more repressed students are loosening up. Pupils are now working on productions of their own, which promise to be exciting and far more creative than they have ever done." Teacher, familiar with some of these techniques, has developed new ones, and has gained far more confidence in using them in her teaching.

-a

Information Sheet 40

A/R Actor

Special Class Objective:

To improve student reading and writing skills by fostering greater confidence and self-image.

Technique:

Improvisation, tape-making, directing.

Procedure:

For three days, AIR had students do vocal and physical warm-up exercises 'and act out scenes from a TV script (The Honeymooners). Then he directed students in improvisations on simple, familiar situations. Subsequently students wrote out the improvisations, taped them, corrected them, and re-enacted.them.

Evaluation:

"StUdents attitude changed from reluctance to enthusiasm, with the exdeption of the three most withdrawn (out of 15). The writing, correcting, and re-enacting of their own scripts would not have been possible without the preparation provided by the A/R." For the first time, one of these students has joined a school club--a direct result of this experience.

*** A/R

Art Objective:

lector

To extend students' understanding of the human body--and the changes that take place under different emotional conditions and physical conditions.

Technique:

Model

Procedure:

Wearing a mask to hide his facial expressions, A/R assumed virious poses of motion and emotion.

Evaluation:

A/R's great contribution was his professional ability in expressing action and emotion--class would not accept a teacher or pupil in this role, .nor could they do it as well.

The work produced by students was far superior "These to anything they had previously done. students never can do this--but they diet!" Teacher is arranging for all other art classes to have the same experience.

- 9 -

Information Sheet 03

LCaIclor

_Home Economics Objective:

To explore family relationships and inter-actions.

Technique:

Improvisation

Procedure:

A/R involved students in improvisations of varying typical family situations.

Evaluation:

A/R had excellent ideas and developed fine rapport with students--one extremely quiet, shy girl spoke up for the first time in class. This project was done in two classes: the first class had discussed the subject matter and been told that the A/R -was, coming - -the result was a_ successful experience. The second class had not

had this preparation--and the result was spectacular (much more free-participation and interest from students).

*** A/R Actor

English Objective:

To stimulate interest in poetry and broaden students sense of language.

Technique:

Reading, modeling

Procedure:

A/R read different types of poetry and asked students to analyze figures of speech and meanings. He chose some "nonsense" poems, asking students to pick out verbs, adjective, nouns, etc from the nonsense words, according to how he read them.

Evaluation:

"A/R's skills very important--students far more involved than when I read to them. This experience 'opened them up' to poetry";

When asked by school to list materials needed for next year, teacher said, "Can't we spend some of the money to have A/R come back?"

- 10-

Information Sheet #3 Spanish

11/11 Actor

Objective:

To review and reinforce subject matter: names of foods.

Technique:

Improvisation

Procedure:

A/R directed improvisation of restaurant situation, with actress playing an American and students playing waiters, maitresd, cashier, and other customers. A/R mimed her requests and students responded with Spanish names of foods etc.

Evaluation: "Slovier students who do not do well in usual structured classroom situation, did well here. One extremely quiet child surprised me by coming I would like to discuss other projects alive. with A/R that I can carry on myself--she is a very good catalyst."

***

Enclosure 0 7 BOAP%D OF COOPERATIVE EDUCATIONAL SERVICES Third Supervisory District of Suffolk County

Gordon A. Wheaton, District Superintendent

EVALUATION OF IN-SERVICE COURSE TALLY_ Course Title: Instructor:

Humanities & Arts Miss Helen Wyeth

Date:

February 19, 1970

A.- Number Satisfied: 5 B. No. would recommend: 5

No. Enrolled: No. Returns:

10

Dissatisfied Not Recommend

0 0

5

C.

Areas of Satisfaction:

1. 2.

The experience and methodology of the educator,Miss Helen Wyeth. The approach of the course which broadened our outlook and removed the classroom walls with more creative methods, giving students a more active and more responsive =11 into the class-

3.

The trip to the museum of Art and the outline to have been followed was excellent. Course was great for my own personal enlightenmOnt and enrichment. I preferred the first part of course. The last three sessions. The practical rather than theoretical approach, the interpersonal involvement and participation share by the instructors, the studends, and-the resident artists.

room.

4. 5.

D.

Areas of Dissatisfaction:

1.

Having two lengthy lesson plans to prepare, considering the length of the course. However, this was minor compare to what we gained from course. The change of the place where course was originally scheduled. The amount of hours of outside work involved was far too great. Many of the art projects. The length of the earlier sessions with dinner break - two hours is sufficLient - additional sessions could be held.

2. 3. 4.

E.

Additional 511agestions

1.

That field trips be held on week-ends whenever possible. Most of us are up at dawn. Continue broadening curriculum, encouraging teachers to bring the present outside world and ideas into the classroom. More development of\the idea that music and the arts can open doors, and improve the cuality of thought in an exciting way, by exploration on the part of the students - "Discovery" is the key to pupil participation and more permanent learning pleasures.

2.

3.

4. 5.

6.

7.

The change of the place where course was originally scheduled. The amount of hours of outsie:e work involved was far too great. A broader c?ectrum of the arts program. Shorter class sessions but more total sessions - involve studends in some of the teaching phases - trying out lessons and materials with the class, for examPle, and additional sessions with grow) participation such as the DanielWebster evening and the sensitivity and awrreness enneriences. Another course with Helen Wyeth for 21ementary Classroom Teachers and r :?ecials. A course frith PAC2 people - artists working out. various classroom problems with the teachers. The course as offered. Another course that 'would explore and provide eperiences in integrating the arts into the on going curriculum.

4

68

BOARD OF COOPERATIVE EDUCATIONAL SERVICES Third Supervisory District of Suffolk County EVALUATION OF IN-SERVICE COURSE

Tally Course Title:

Integrating the Performing Arts into the Curriculum

Instructor:

Date:

C. * *

* *

* *

* *

* *

* * *

* '*

* *

**

Returns:

19

January 14, 1969

Number Satisfied: 17 Number would recommend: 17

A. B.

O Enrolled: 49

,fied: 1 Diss; Recotmerid: 1

Areas of Satisfaction: The variety of speakers and material presented. Meeting and listening to the PACE performers explain their aspect of the arts and its role in the classroom. The idea that this course has made some teachers aware of the importance and value of the arts in the curriculum. The presentation of the course by Mr. Marantz;varied performers; artists; personalities; materials and equipment used during these sessions. Guest lecturers and exchange among those enrolled. Music presentation - The drama group was fair. mr. Ea.prow's second section was informative and in eresting. tations made by the teachers. v-Rre TA.ki g with the artists and exchanging ideas with teachers from other schools. Class discussions. The use of performers to demonstrate techniques, as well as teachers. My entire approach has changed. Actors in residence. The enthusiasm of Mr. Marantz and of the guests. Visiting artists and lively discussion and teacher involvement. Mr. Marantz. Guest speakers. The many ideas I culled from the course. Opportunity to hear qualified, competent people express their ideas and experiences. The presentations of all of the artists, the general atmosphere, the discussions. I can't say that I am satisfied or dissatisfied with the course. However, I would like to say that I am happy to have had the experience of taking this course. Many good ideas were presented by the participants that will probI can't say ably change some of my teaching techniques. I that I am sold on the idea of the Artist in Residence. feel that we have a great deal of talent amonq staff members. This should be used. These people have been properly trained to understand children anei should adapt and use Proper techniques of involving the children in the use of the arts in covering the curriculum.

69

D. * *

*

* * * * *

E. * * *

* * *

* *

Areas of Dissatisfaction: Disappointing cancellation of planned demonstrations. Too much lecture and too little integration of the actual arts with the course. Example: Ballet or dance group presentation. The length of the course. My feelings of frustration because my school (elementary) does not reap the benefit of these performers and the lack of material available to me. The dance session was disappointing. Not much to it. The eating problem. Dance and music sessions. Would have liked more participation in these sessions. Fact that for credit, a presentation must be made. I feel that-it was never made clear to us just "how" one goes about integrating the arts with the curriculum. I felt that the course was one continuous motivation for a never existThere were many discussions, but we never came ing lesson. to "grips" about one thing-the guests were interesting but the course in general was a poorly planned one. Additional Suggestions: Live performing involving youth in the course at various sessions. That the performers perform. Demonstration lectures similar to what the Britannica people have done with Hamlet and Macbeth. Lessons planned so that the elementary, school teacher can gather material easily to facilitate the teaching of lessons with the arts and humanities in mind. Meeting every week. It is hard to keep track at bi-monthly meetings and a lag in interest. Meet in a different school ihvironment each time. An evaluation be required. You continue the creative features of education. Shortening the course from 4 hours with 1 hour break or 3h hours with h hr. break (as it turned out) to 3 hours with no break, with coffee available. Or offer course every week for 2 hours.

70

BOARD OF COOPERATIVE EDUCATIONAL SERVICES Third Supervisory District of Suffolk County EVALUATION OF IN-SERVICE COURSE

Ta4y. Course Title: Instructor:

Humanities and the Arts Mx. Clint Marantz-

Date:

June, 1969

Number Satisfied: 15 Number would recommend:

A. B. Cd * * * * * * *

* *

* * * *

*

* *

15

0 Enrolled: # Returns:

25 le

Dissatisfied: 3 Not Recommend: 3

Areas of Satisfaction: Practical aspects: One of the few courses that provided me with techniques that work. The guest lecturers - plus comments of others enrolled in course. Suggestions for teachers getting children involved in the different art forms. PACE program in our school district directly related to course. The ballet performance and the rehearsal. Mr. Sweet's demonstration and lecture. Acquaintance with the work of the young artists who were bringing the benefit of their art directly to the classrooms. I thought the evening when they gave the report one of the high points of the course. The enthusiasm of the leader, Clint Marantz. The sense of involvement in education created by five entertainers. The concept of learning by implementing the performing arts can take on dimensions of personal appeal not otherwise attainable. The activity involved getting people moving and I hope children eventually. Creative dramatics; the session on aesthetic experience. The instructor's enthusiasm and interest in exciting teachers to curriculum change. The artists who described their parts in their PACE assignments, the privilege of attending professional performances and above all the stimulating and, inspiring spirit of our director, Mr. Marantz. Mr. Marantz, his enthusiasm and philosophy and interest in progressive techniques to be used in the elementary schools. I enjoyed the pioneer spirit and approach, and my involvement in class. The entire course. One of the best I have ever taken. The many varied ideas that I received which are very pratical and applicable to every clay teaching.

71 D. *

Areas of Dissatisfaction: Dance rehearsal lesson. Some narticinants in tiro course "overparticipated"-- comments too lengthy- anti repetitious.

*

* *

The fact that the purpose of the course is still not clear, also objectives were not really accomplished. Guest lecturers knew their subject but were unable to show how their particular skill could be used by the classroom teacher. There was too much talk - not enough specific ideas or demonstrations. Outside of the very pleasant ballet Performance the. only inspiration I had came from a class member's presentation of the Carl Orff instruments. I would like very much to know more about these. Probably the dance has many possibilities in the classroom, however, these were really never demonstrated. Why couldn't classroom teachers in the course set up a situation that might occur in the classroom and have the dancers show how they would use their dance to aid in the teaching. (A few short simple examples go much further than hours of talk.) The general discussion periods seemed to go far afield. I think stronger guidance on the part of the moderator might have been a good idea. The difficulty in "spreading the gospel". Entire content in that it supposedly was to involve the entire educative process, not specifically the elementary system.

There was nothing of value in the course for the teacher of secondary school. E.

Additional Suggestions: Less professional more teacher participation. Some of the teachers in our class can do a better job than some (not all) of the professionals. * Actual problems - as we go along - lesson to be taught - discuss how we can teach it. * More sensitivity training and creative dramatics. * More time given to discussion by the artist in residence of the work they were doing with children with general discusDirect program more toward elementary school level. sion. This is the only place where change can hopefully begin. Jr. and Sr. High School is too late for both students and teachers. They've already been spoiled by the system. * Involving more principals and their assistants. Including more descriptions of classroom activities that illustrate the theory of this course. * Hudanities define involvement for curriculum enrichment. * Use of local factories for tours of teachers to broaden their background. * If at all possible, the opportunity to see an actual class situation of PACE artists working out a problem with teacher and pupils. Also, more opportunity to discuss: problems and receive suggestions from experienced PACE artists for correlating humanities and arts with curriculum in elementary *

school.

72

E.

Additional Suggestions.

A course cbncerned with developing creativity among secondary school teachers. People -to teach who are involved and excited by their subject as was Mx. Marantz and more invovement of people in class themselves. Less emphasis on the artist himself and more on the practical approach for the classroom.

3110.

""

Enclosure

3

An Evaluation of the Math and Science Teachers' Workshop (11/22/69)

An Interview with MX. Robert Mandell - Dec., 1969 Mr. Mandell stated that he felt that the Workshop had been very worthwhile anel that the format of the Workshop had been successful, despite the fact that there was some.Afficulty keeping the teachers on the subject of problems during the morning session--they tended to slide into discussion of solutions-but he thought Laxity did very well in channeling the talk back to problems. program is very well suited to Mr. Mandell believes that the 7th and 8th graiie math, where students are learning the skills involved in manipulating numbers, and that the type of representation of numbers demonstrated by the A/Rs during the Workshop couldbe very valuable. The basic nrinciples that students learn in 7th ani 8th grades lend themselves to this techniaue--and are such that the principle learned for one problem can be.carried0Over to other problems. By 9th grade, Mr. Mandell stated, the basic principles should be well established, and the student must begin to. learn to think in abstract terms. The typeof portrayal, animation and representation that the AIR can contribute-defeats this purpose. Ideally a teacher If ode abstract idea is clarified should not even use a black board: through a devise such as the AIR activity, it*defeats the ultimate purpose of teaching students to think abstractly. And in the 9th grade curriculum the carry-over pronerty of basic principles does not apply as it does in 7th and 8th grades. Mr. Mandell thinks this is true in any 9th grade math course, but most emphatically in a school which has.a9th grade Regents program, a program which exerts considerable time pressure on students and teachers in order to cover the required curriculum. Mr. Mandell reported that the Workshop had changed his thinking in one respect. In the past he has used the device of story telling to help his students approach a problem'abstractly. For example: "You are shepherds who have flocks of sheep to take care of. In= are uneducated--you cannot read or count, you cannot even count on your fingers--how can you be sure that every one ofsour sheep comes in at night; Figure out a way to keen track of all of your animals under .the given conditions." As a result of the Workshop discussions and demonstrations, Mr. Mandell now feels that this same nurpose, thinking out a problem in abstract terms, can be better served through the device of improvisation by the students. He stated that he hopes to pass on to the other math teachers in his school the fund of information gleaned from the Workshop session, through the math department. Recorded by:

Kas Bendiner

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W

PAF Reflect.? qpqmunit Needs

One of the primary Pedmises of the PAC Project was t%nt the commitment

of PIF to the area-both to the schools and to the

general communitywould be moat effective in bringing about its goals.

mitment

There have been tangible d.aonstrations of how this comhas reflected the community needs:

a.

PAP commissioned the creation of a theatrical collage "Whitman 150" (privately published, 1970) to acquaint the students with a native of the community who had achieved greatness as a poet. At the invitation of the Walt Whitman Birthplace Association, this was presented as the sesquicentennial of Whitman's birth. (On file.)

b.

In 1960 when there was a need for an artistic expression of Black culture for the white community, PAP commissioned Herbert Deutsdh, composer-in-residence, to write a piece o: music that could be performed by junior high students. Early in 1969, PAP published MUTIMA 3n African Tale. ox the Creation (interactions for ..calicat

.9P.r.ous45)11

ensempls,_ flute and audipappy. (On file.) c.

In 1960 the Director of the PAP Dance Ensemble created a new work GRAFFITI based on a particular experience with the junior high students.

d.

An example of how PAP's theatre style reflects the character of the community it commented upon in Urban :renewal. Hits OUP. TOWN, a feature story in a Long 'Islam' Newspaper. (On file.)

Enclosure * 10

Dissemination To foster accL?tance of the PACE.ideas in both the schools and the community, P2\F invested a large amount of time and ef-

fort (using vast numbers of volunteer-hours as well as staff time to help PACE publish and distribute a newsletter, issue flyers, furnish press releases, provide speakers and a slide lecture for PTAs, school boards and other organizations, and is devising a multi-media presentation describing its 'basic philosophy.

PAP efforts inspired several articles in national magazines about the PACE Project (of which we are most appreciative).

1970-07
ERIC Archive, Aesthetic Education, Art Appreciation, Cultural Enrichment, Humanities, Junior High Schools, Theater Arts,
English