ERIC ED091500: Third Year Evaluation of the Maryland Career Development Project. Vol. 2. Final Evaluation Report

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DOCUMENT RESUME ED 091 500 AUTHOR TITLE

.

INSTITUTION

SONS AGENCY BUREAU NO PUB DATE GRANT NOTE

EDRS PRICE DESCRIPTORS

-,m

IDENTIFIERS

CE 001 110 Orr, David B.; Vincent, Kathleen S. Third Year Evaluation of the Maryland Career \Development Project. Vol. 2. Final Evaluation \Report. Audo-Read Systems, Inc., Silver Spring, Md.; Maryland \State Dept. of Education, Baltimore. \Bureau of Adult, Vocational, and Technical Education (DHEW/OE), Washington, D.C. 0-361-0021 Jul 73 OEG-0-70-5166 160p.; For the final report of this project, see dt' 001 009 MF-$0.75 HC-$7.80 PLUS POSTAGE *Career Education; Elementary Grades; Inservice eacher Education; Instructional Materials; Junior Nigh Schools; *Pilot-Projects; *Program Descriptions; ; *Program Evaluation; Resource Materials; Resource eachers; Senior High Schools; *State Programs; teacher Developed Materials; Teacher Workshops; Work Experience Programs /Maryland

ABSTRACT /1/ The report covers evaluation activities of Audo-Read Systems Iduring the final year of the Maryland Career Development ProjectA a/project which provided several programs or activities of an exemplary nature designed to facilitate career development. Its objectives were to help students: (1) develop a positive self-concept and greater self-understanding; (2) learn about and understand the range of educational and career opportunities; (3) develop and use the' decision-making process. more effectively; (4) make smoother transitions at .key points in their career lives. The report focuses on three components of the project (elementary, junior high, and senior high_school)-and is organized'by sections in each of which a project goal, method planned for achieving it, and_expectedresults are presented. The evaluation procedure, data, results and discussion pertaining to that goal are then presented. Elementary teachers and program planners may find the 74 pages of appendixes of special value, for they include program descriptions, transcripts of elementary school observations, elementary teacher progress-reports, and instruments used in the :evaluation at primary and intermediate levels.-(Instruments used to survey workshop participants are included in the text.) (Author/AJ)

.VOLUME II

EvaluatiowReport.

Project Number 0- 361 -0021

Grant Number OEG-0-70-5186.

U.S DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH. EDUCATION & WELFARE NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF EDUCATION THIS DOCUMENT HAS BEEN REPRO DUCED EXACTLY AS RECEIVED FROM THE PERSON OR ORGANIZATION OR/GIN A TING IT POINTS OF VIEW OR OPINIONS STATED DO NOT NECESSARILY REPRE SENT OFFICIAL NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF EDUCATION POSITIDN OR POLICY.

The Maryland Career Development Project

David B. Orr, Ph.D. Kathleen S. Vincent, M.S.

The research reported heriAn was performed pursuant to a contract with the Jffice of Education, U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare. Contractors. undertaking such projects under ?overnment sponsorship are encouraged to express freely their rrbfeSsional judgement in the conduct of the project. Points of view or opinions stated do not, therefore, necessarily represent officialjOffice of Education position or policy. .

U.S. Department bf Health, Education and Welfare

Office of Education Vocational and Technical Branch

SirtirillENIS. INC. Suite 1022-C

8715 First Avenue

Silver Spring, Md. 20910

FINAL REPORT.

Third Year Evaluation of the ct

Maryland Career Development Project

Prepared by David B. Orr, Ph.D. Kathleen S. Vincent,I4.S.

Audo-Read Systems, Inc. Silver Spring, Md..

for

The Maryland State Department of Education

13 July 1973

(301) 588'9334)

Contents

I.

BACKGROUND h.

I.. THE EVALUATION AND ITS RESULTS Elementary Component.

7 8 c'

Junior High School Component

44

Senior High School Component

73

III. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

APPENDICES APPENDIX A - Component Program Descriptions APPENDIX B - Transcript of Elementary School Observations APPENDIX C - Elementary .Teacher Progress Reports APPENDIX D - Instruments Used in the EValuation

79

EXHIBITS

-Exhibit 1

Exhibit 2

Career Awareness - Frequency Distributions (Primary)

21

Career Awareness - Frequency Distributions (Intermediate),

22

,or

, ....

Frequendy Distributions

Self Awareness

32

Exhibit 4

Frequency Distributions - Self Awareness (Intermediate)

33

Exhibit 5

Outline Career Education Resource Book

39

Exhibit 6

Table of Contents - Resource Notebook

40

Exhibit 7

Contents of McCormick Plan

47

Exhibit 8

Results for Teaching/Leirning Tryout

50

Exhibit 9

Maryland Career Education Development Project Workshop

62

Exhibit 10

Career Education Workshop for Junior High School Counselors

64

Exhibit 11

Career Education Workshop Assessment Sheet

67

Exhibit 12.

SVA Division Conference on Career Education

Agenda

69

Exhibit 13

SVA Division Conference on Career Education - Career Education Workshop.

71

Exhibit 14

VIEW Use Card

74

Exhibit 15,

VIEW Use Survey

77

Exhibit 3

(Priniary)

TABLES

'A

Table 1

Workshop Survey Results

11.

Table 2

Career Awareness - Primary Median's

18

Table 3

Career Awareness - Occupational Medians

19

Table 4

Career Awareness - Intermediate Medians

23

Table 5

Results of Career Awareness Intermediate Paragraphs

27

Table 6

Primary Self Awareness - f Distributions by Class

34

Table 7

Intermediate Self Awareness - f Distributions.by Class

35

Table 8

Summary of Self-Awareness Semantic Differential. Means.

36

Table 9

Cooperative. Work Experience Program-School 72

53

Table 10

Cooperative Work. Experience Program-School 80

55

Table 11

Average Employer Ratings of Student Employees

59

Table 12

Summary of Information Gathered on VIEW Use Cards Southern High School

75

PREFACE

In June 1970, the Maryland Career Development Project began operation under funding from the U.S. Office of Education (Contract No. OEC-0-70-5186 (361)), under the provisions of Part D (Exemplary Programs) of the Vocational Education Amendments of 1968.

In conformance with the regulations asseciated,

with such projects, theMaryland Career Development Project set up an evaluation program' utilizing third party evaluators.

Evaluations were carried out'

during the first two years of the project by Dr. Walter S. Mietus; 11r. Chris'

Stilling, and Mr. Ted Glenn whose reports covering the first two years of the

project have been previOuslybmitted (August 1971 and August 1972).

In

November of 1972, a contract way awarded to Audo-Read Systems, Inc., Silver Spring, Maryland,to carry, out an evaluation study on the third and final year of the project.

With minor exceptions, this evaluation Was to focus

on_three remaining components of the program, centered in Baltimore City, and to concentrate on developments occuring during the third and final year. This report is the Fourth Quarterly, and Final, Report covering the,_,,

evaluation activities carried out by Audo-Read Systems during the third

and finalyear of the Maryland Career Development Project. AudoRead Systems wishes to express its gratitude to the many persons of theBaltimore Schools and the Maryland State Department ofEducation' who kindly extended their help and cooperation during the course of this.study.

r

/

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Third Year Eva ilia Lion Report

Maryland Career Development Project .

The- evaluation was carried .out by Audo-Read Systems, Xnc.,i according

1.0 an approved Plan based upon-a series of goats set forth by,the Project'

E's first translated these goal's into an apProved set of procedures

Staff.

and data to becollected The evaluation focused upon three components of the Project centered in the Baltimore City Schools:,'

Elementary Component,.

iunior IliTh-choolComponent, and Senior High School Component.

Some

-

attention was also given to the other components and the prior years of the ProCiect.,

The major results of the evaluation are summarized below: OOP

Flementary Component

-A,"Program Description" was developed, based upon documents, observations, and interviews, to describe the "process" employed by the Project Lo achieve its goals.

Subsequent observations and interviews indicated that

the Project was proceeding

as planned.

.

The two. planned work--

shops to develop "leadership,skills" in career education were held as planned and were well received by the attending teachers;

Plans and

activities develpped by the teachers at theseworkshopswere foun6 to be included in their classroom activities., as intended..

Some of the evaluation

activities proposed by the Project Staff in connection with -these workshops were not carried out:-

The Project intended to improve the self awareness and career awareness "[-the students.

Data 'collected by the E's indiceted,that substantial pro-

.

-

gross was made toward these goals, at least in selected insbinces, even though administrative difficulties within' the school system essentially invalidated the pretest-posttest 'design planned by the E's.

Finally, on planned by the ProjectStaff,.a resource guide (for career awareness programs ..was developed, basedlargely on the contributions of the teachers during the course -of the workshops.

While this guide has much Useful

potential, it. lacks some of the planned sectionS, transitional material, and an efficient organization for general usage.

The E's concluded that the major goala of the elementary component had

been essentially met, and that a major result ofthe Project effort had been a sensitization of the school community to career education and a greatly increased emphasis which would undoubtedly have significant impact on students,

Junior7Hivh-heol--Component The ProjectStaff had planned. to develop a "Career Exploration Model", drawing upon a number of prior and ongoing efforts in .6areer education in Baltimore.

It did so.

However, the model lacked a certain coherence, .con-

tinuity, and theoretical framework,,and was somewaht fragmented due to its dependence upon its various component origins.

In addition, it was not field

tested as planned, except-for one brief tryout of a small portion of its contents.

A base,-of, philosophyand goals was developed, however.

A "ProllraM Description" was., prepared for the Cooperative..Work Experience

Program portion of this component which consisted of a special academic program -,

combined with on-the-job experience for about 70-"high riskstudents at-two junior high schools..

About 10.students dropped the program for various reasons..

The remaining students continued the trend from last year toward decreasing---' absendes, .but no impact on achievement could be determined from the crudegrade data available. and "Good".

.Employers rated the students attitudes between "Fair"

One school did better, than the other, probably because of the

better background of the students or because its students were all 9th graders, though it did havesomewaht more. meaningful jobs for its students.

All jobs

were atsomewhat l,-+w job skill levels, but provided significant employability skill-development.

As promised, the Project Staff created 43 teaching/learning packages to 7,o with the work experience program.

However, these did not appear to haVe

been based upon an overall plan, and only one Oackage.was.briefly tried out..

Reactions to these packages have been favorable; however, further tryout and possible revision was recommended by the E's. The Scheduled in-service program for junior higa school counselors was successfully conducted and well-received by the participants.

Again, the E'sconcluded that the-Project Staff had essentially met the goals which they had set forth

though considerable work remains to be done

before the dissemination and extension of these activities and produCts to oLocr schools-inthe,.--system.

-- -

110

The Scntor 1110 Component The Project'Staff had proposed to establish a prototype Occupational Infot!...

matioh Center At Southern'High School, which. they did.

A "Program Description"

....

was developed to describe this comvnent.

The'Center was organized around the

VIEWsystem}incoxporating a microfilm reader and printer.

Although the Center

was established, andthd equipment installed in a number of other schools} equipment diffieulties continued to be,a problem.

Data collection also indicated

that only a small fraction of the student body voluntarily used the system, though they indicated essential satisfaction with it.. Only 12.occupation cards were added to the file of 72 occupation cards during. the course of the year. Vew if any outsiders visited the Center- to see the syStem.

Thus, although the

Center was established, many of the expectations for it were not realized. -,'

The Project Staff had planned in-servicetraining-for--seletted-teachers of SoUthern High orienting,them to career education and to its implications for the teaching of this subject matter areas.

This was not done.- Instead, two addresses

on career education and the teacher's responsibilities were given by a University of Maryland professor.

In the E's opinion, this did not meet the goal originally

speci'fied.

The E's concluded that this component has made the least progress of the three,7and that -serious attention must be given to both the equipment and the

contents of the.system before further dissemination of the systeM is attempted. Summary

In general, it was concluded that the Maryland Career Development Project had succeeded in attaining,the large majority of its goals, and that it had created a favorable climate for, and an emphasis on,"career education which should have great.impact.on the school community.

mendAtons were

A number of specific recom-

These included the need for better organization and

lines-of communication in the-administration of the project and the use of resources; more explication of functional and behavioral objectives and criterion.

behaviors; fUrther developmentof.the prodUCts of the Project; systematic planning _-

and coordivation including'evalhation, tryouts, and feedback; and greater participation of active teachers in. the planning, evaluation, and in,..ervice processes..

Taken constructively, the E's feel that these recommendations will support and enhance the futther development of career educatiOn in.BaltimOre which seems strongly indicated.

BACKGROUND

I.

This section of ourreport deals with the general structure Of the Maryland Career Development Projectl a synopsis of the evaluation plan which waa devised by Audo Read Systems, Inc. (ARS) to evaluate the third year activities of this prOject; and a discussion of the context in which the evaluation was conducted, including the constraints and compromises which developed in carrying out the approved

Background of-the Career Development Project it is not our intention here to summarize the, rationale. and reasoning

behind the activitiesof the Maryland Career Development Project, but rather to present for the interested reader a summary of the Baltimore components of th

ploject which formed the subject of the evaluation effort. This summary is based upon two sources.

The first is the description of

the components as found in the operating documents and plans prepared by the Project Staff.

The,second is the distillation of the findings of the evaluation

team, based. upon direct observations and upon interviews with the persons

mcbordinating:the_program.

Descriptions of the three Baltimore components are

to be found in Appendix A under the title of Component Program .Descriptions.

The following materials summarize the general structure of

Maryla,nd Career

Development Project as derived from the plans and operating procedures transmitted

to Lhe evaluation teamby the project staff. The Maryland Career Development Project provided several programs or activities of an exemplary nature which.were designed to facilitate the process of career development, by accomplishing or demonstrating one or more of the .... _

following broad objectives: 'o

To help individuals develop a positive self- concept and a greater degree of self-understanding.

o

To help,, students learn about and understand the range of

educational and career opportunities presently, available

and that are likely to be available in the future. o

To help students develop and use the decision-making process more effectively.

1

o

To holp individuals make smoorhor transitions at key points during their career-life, such as the transition -from school to further training or Co work.

To.acheve these broad,goals, The Maryland Career Development Project

set.

4

up 'a

r.ci'ios of acttvities-to: 1.

Provide a resource person in career development to work with the

teachers and counselors in eidlt elementary schools in Baltimore City and

devise procedures, programs, and materials which would: , help youngsters, learn more aboUt theMselves and see a, themselves positively. b.

Help youngsters learn more about-the world of wotk and to relate this knowledge to their work 4n school.

2.

Develop a.workshep for teams of junior .high school counselors'; teachers,

administrators, and specialist's in WhiCh'they'Oeuld learn-abOut:the concept of

career jeyelopment, and work together in planning career exploration programs .4

own schools.

for

Develop a comprehensive information system which would utilize various media, along With computer and microfilm technology.in making available various kinds of iaformation about education, training, and employment opportunities.

.

This system should strengthen the existing placement process, thereby enabling _studenta to make a smoother transition from school to the 'world of work or further education or training. 4.

Work with neighborhood employers and community agencien in developing

a work-oriented program fordrop-out prone students.

The program would be designed

to set up interaction between students, the school, and the community in such way that students learn a variety of skills 'related to employability and people in the community learn more about the school's programs. 5.

7,

Produce a television series of aPprdXiMately fourteen thirt.V 'Minute

programs whichwill be oriented towards students in.grades

,The primary .

purpose of the series was to -facilitate the career exploration process. 6.

Develop a State career development resource notebook. for educator:S.

7.

Conduct a state-wide conference devoted to the concept,of career 4

development, its objectives and programs.

To achieve the above goals seven major components or action projects were designed each with a set of terminal objectives which were to 'be implemented.

2

d;.Screle major components wore: 1.

Junior High School Component

2.

Elementary. School Component

3.

Computer Interactive Learning System (Information and Placement. System) Component

4.

Work Advocate Component

5.

Instructional Television Series Component

6:

Career Development Notebook

7.

State Wide Dissemination Conference

The multiple objectives of the components were analyzed for congruency with the stated terminal objectives of the proposal and conditions expected and set forth by'the U.S. Office of Education.

The third party evaluation team did

recogni4e the objectives of the components and the planned strategies of imple mcutation to be appropriate.

Appropriateness was determined by interacting with

all staff leaders of the components, reviewing implementation activities and alternate strategies for achieving the goals.

The present report is concerned with the activities of the new third party evaluation and with components 1, 2, and 3 above.

These three (Baltimore City)

components are elaborated below. 1.

The Elementary Career Development Resource Component

The objective of this component is to provide a resource teacher and a paraprofessional to work with the teachers and counselors in eight elementary schools and to devise procedures, programs and materials which will a.

help youngsters_ learn more about themselves and see themselves

positively; and la,.

help youngsters learn more about the world of work and the relationship.of education to it;

The resource teacher and her assistant have achieved this objective through several kinds of activities. .

The resource teacher has worked with city-

wide durr!,culum committees.and curriculum specialists in order to incorporate

information about the world of work and career education into the existing curriculum. _In addition, the resource teacher has conducted faculty meetings and inservice programs in order to inform the faculties in eight partiCipating schools of the concept of career development and its implications for education. Finally,. the resource teacher, has developed and demonstrated a variety of

materials and techniques such as simulated work tasks, gaming procedures, the

cf;:ztivo L.3e of community resources and field trips, and the utilizntion of .11ni-eaLa and community members as work -role models.

The Junior High Work-Oriented (Cooperative) Component

2.

The objective of this compolent is to provide training in employability a7:ilis to 65 students in two junior high school settings (General Henry Lee and 1-Nock Glen Junior High Schools).

Private employers and small businessmen were

racr-aited for the purpose of providing training in employability skills and in attitude dcvelopment. training.

The employers were paid a set amount per hour for this

They, in turn, returned their training allowance to the students in

the foirm of a reward system as the students developed the required employability .Tile interaction between school per6Ohnel and businessmen in the community

has eeen 3.

interest.

Information and Placement System Component Th.:: objective of the Information and Placement System Component is to

?zovIA:c- students with up-to-date, reliable, and accurate information about career

and calcational opportunities, thereby' increasing the effectiveness of the existing system in Baltimore City.

The information dissemination vehicle consisted

originally of a computerized element.

However, at the requeit of the U.S. Office

of Education, this was changed to a microfilth system, commonly known as VIEW. B.

Diusion of the Evaluation Plan Tne third party evaluation was to be concerned with all three of the above

described components.

The E's assumed the responsibility for developing the

Evals.ation Plan from the objectives for each component, and carrying it out. They assumed however. no responsibility for other evaluative activities in progress

or planned, other than as advisers.

The details of the project and the requirements for the evaluation were discL:aaed by representatives of ARS, the Maryland State Department of Education,

and tic City of Baltimore at a series of meetings beginning on 8 August 1972 (notably 23 September and 6 October), and resulted in the submission of an 2valuation Plan on 10 October.

This Plan reflected ARS's best understanding of

the tequirementa of the project at that time and was revised on 1.November to

reflect.crtain changes requested by the U.S. Office of Education. i::.corporaLcd intn the Contract.

This Plan was--

The final contract was received by ARS on 11

'.'November 1972, at which time the evaluation effort actually began.

This was a

than had oceif antiCipated, and placed the development

of

.0aseres and data under presrxre ;:vriluaLion Plan called for a basic design comprised of a pre! -post

coitir.ed with processed monitoring.

It specified an evaluation which

owid ocvoloil a comprehensive assessment of present status with respect to objectives of each component and the treatments being employed; ,.s:.;e:-.a the treatment process; and perform an end-of-year assessment to

determine the effects of the treatments in the attainment of the objectives. The'fillal report was to record the procedures and results of the evaluation 4.1-a

to prc:;ent interpretive results, recommendations and conclusions, and the

duta nallyoes supporting them.

Control groups were to be used on17 where

possible to set up meaningfulcontrols on important sources of variation. As a further definition of the focus of evaluation, the Evaluation Plan stated "the evaluation by the third party is to befocused explicitly on the objectives agreed upon previously by the project representatives and the U.S.

Office of Education... it is assumed that the third party evaluators will be expert in evaluation methodology.

As such they would not be asked to evaluate

the components and materials from the point of view of subject matter experts (e.3., the merits of the content of the training materials).

te coducLed by other subject matter consultants."

Such review'should

The Plan then proceeded to

detail t4,1. objectives as they were at that time stated by the project.

Finally, the Plan stated a series of tasks to be performed in the conduct of the evaluation: 1.

Restatement of objectives.

E's would restate the objectives given to

Char« by the project staff in a form which would provide a basis for the design

of instrumentation and a definition of data to be collected. 2.

Collection of baseline data,

This task contemplated the early

collection of data in each of the areas in which such collection was indicated to serve as a baSeline for the comparison with end-of-year results. 3...

In order to determine changes in the planning,

Process documentation.

development and execution of any of the components, detailed interviews were auggested as a basis for comparing actual implementatiPn with the planned treatments. 4.

End -of, -year measures,

These measures wquld be developed to assess

treatment results; this would include the collection of interview, questionnaire, and record data -41 April/May 1973.

5.

Data analysis.

The darn would be analyzed, and suitable comparisons

and descriptive statistics would be computed. 6.

C.

Reports. FinallTa schedule of reports was presented.

Implmentation of the Evaluation Plan Before describing the'results of.the evaluation, it is necessary to

describe some of the constraints Under which the evaluation took place.

It

shoul.d first be :noted that ARS believes that the Evaluation Plan as presented

And approedhy all concerned was a realistic design capable of providing useful information about the project.

It had been developed in full awareness

ef the potential problems associated with evaluation work in the public school setting.

Unfortunately, serious compromises with the design had to be made

dur.ing the course of the study.

These resulted from a series of inter- related

difficulties.

Theinitial .probiem was that the evaluation project was already six weeks behind schedule when final approvals to-begin were obtained.

As a result, efforts

to develop instrumentation and make arrangements for the baseline data collection

were'impared.

HoWever, ARS produced a restatement of objectives and defined

the data to be gathered in a document which was submitted on'14 November 1972.

This document became the subject of considerable discussion and was approved by all parties at that time.

It called for a definition of career awareness and

self-awareness to. be supplied by project staff and key'instrumentation to be .developed and applied to baseline data collection before-the Christmas Holidays. Unfortunately,' this goal was not achieved, and in fact some of -Elie "baseline"

data was actually not made available to the E's until April and May of 1973. Much of the difficulty which occasioned these considerable delays was a function of two factors.

The first was the-fact that'E's were constrained from'

making direct contact with the schools and school personnel except through certain project staff as intermediaries.

As a consequence,the ability,of the E's to

establish an efficient data collection schedule was'seriously impaired.

Secondly.

a ;rent many other. Activities officially sanctioned by the school system were

also taking place in the same schools as those involved in the project.

For

this reason both administrative and instructional personnel were greatly overloaded with.demands on their time.

The net result of both of these administrative

difficulties (which persisted throughout the year) was the irretrievable delay of the collection of certain of the data which had been required to implement the

6

design or planned.

As a consequence of these difficulties, it became

neces:mry with one exception to abandon the pre -post, design feature of the ir.%11%ultion.

The value of the process observations was also sharply cur-

tailed, since the observations in question could not 'actually be conducted

until nearly the end of the project and thus lost any feedback value

they

might have. had to the project staff.

Ando-Read Systems makes no apologies for the difficulties encountered ......

in these respects.

These problems were repeatedly presented tothe project

staff and discussed in weekly meetings from December onward. of the::;e'difficulties were the most practicable possible.

The resolutions

Overall, it is our

feeling that the evaluation information which is contained in this report is the most complete and useful information which could 'have been gathered under the circumstances (given the constraints which existed).

No further reference

to the implementation of the plan will be made'during the remainder of this report, but the reader is, cautioned to bear in mind that the operational

conditions of the evaluatiOn as described above resulted in conclusions and recommendations which are often based more upon the best judgment of the E's and their interpretations of the data collected, than'upon rigorous design. II.

THE EVALUATION AND ITS RESULTS

As has been indicated earlier, the first task undertaken by the E's was the restatement of the objectives of the three components supplied to the E's by the project staff, and the specification of the data and measures which would be developed and applied as part of the evaluation.

A document to.this

.

effect was prepared and submitted on 14 November and after suitable-tea/Lew was approved.

This document then became the framework for the evaluation.

It

might be noted at this point that, the goals of the project. were rather broad

and that the major function of this document was to define operationally those aspects of each of the goals which would be subjected to measurement and evaluation.

In the ensuing sections, each'Project Goal is presented as it was stated by the Project Staff, along with the method planned and the results expected. Following these, the evaluation procedure and data to be collection (as approved in the 14 November document) are presented and the results are presented and Subsequently the next-Goal Is presented

discussed pertaining to that goal.

7

and discussed in the same fashion.

These presentations are further aubdivided

:Iccordini; to the,three Components concerned.

Thus rather than being presented

sll in ono section, the results and discussion are presented in connection with

each of the goals established by the project staff for each of thqgomponents. (A-summary of conclusions and recommendations follows in Section III which draws together the findings of the project as a whole.)

Elementary Component During the past (third) year of the project, 20 teachers in 8 schools participated actively in the Project, covering a grade range of 1 -6 with one special education class.

These teachers served more than 560 students. (According

to information supplied by these teachers in the interviews, an unknown.number of additional teachers also engaged-in career education activities in their classes n8 a result of exposure to the project.)

This number of teachers and

students is down sharply from that.reported by.previous evaluators for both the first and second years of.the-project (34 teachers, 1350 students and 50 teachers, 1635 studentg, respectively).

The E's have- madeinquiries. to deter-

. .

.

mine .Lhe xeason for this drop.

Project Staff have indicated that the third

year participants were selected from among those participating in.earlier years rn a deliberate reduction of the scope of the dfort. The rationale for this

reduction was that theProject was to focus on certain staff development activities during the third year (through the medium of the workshops) and could not handle the larger number of teachers with the resources available. It was further expected that a more intensive. effort with the smaller group

of teachers would provide these teachers with the basis for acting as resoutte, teachers themselves in future years after Projedt support for career education had been terminated with the end of.the Federal grant. It should be noted, as mentioned above, 'that. thisplan has already begun

to work in the sense that a number of teachers not formally a part of the

third year program haVe engaged in career education activities in their on classes, drawing upon the aCtivities and participation of their colleagues who are a part of the participant group.

Mowever, to the E's knowledge, no.

I

I

I

syscliw1C 'plan to enhance this type of dissemination of the content of the Project has boon developed by the Project Staff, and the extent to which the participant teachers wi14 prove effective as on-site resource. persons for the other teachers is riot clear at the present Lime.

Coal. I - The development of leadership skills A.

MeLhod - Two 2 1/2 day workshops for teachers and

adMinistrators. Expec Led resul ts 4

Two teachers and one administrator from each

of the eight project schools 'will develop leadership. skills to becomes

eNperts in the implementation of career awareness programs.

Leadership

skills have been defined to the project staff as the ability to plan, operate and evaluate career awareness plan or program as appropriate to the particular school. Data collected

E's received agendas-and attendance lists for-both scheduled.workshops showing that they were held on 5, 6, and 7 October 4972 and 17, 18, and 19 January 1973 at Lake Clifton Senior High School. the first workshori.and 21 the second.

Twenty-two people attended

However, only .2 administrators (really

senior teachers) attended these workshops, so that the.project-did not succeed in attaining the administrative .participation in these workshops that it might. However, planning ..meetings were held, prior to the workshops which did involve

administrators from each of .the schools.

As-a-part of' theworkshoPa, participants were expected.tbdeveloP -plans acceptable to the project staff covering the. content, operation, and

evaluation of their career awareness programs.

A review of the "plans"

developed in the first workShop suggests that they are more in' the nature of

suggested activities and'assessments of those activities than-plans per se. were however deemed acceptable by the project staff.

They

E's have conducted obser-

vations at. each of the 8 project schools (see'Summary'of Observations, Appendix JO and have found that the activities going on in the school are identical or very,

similar to those specified in the plans developed at the first workshop. Further, evidence of this can be found in the reports Of activities submitted Co the second workshop as progresS reports from -the, teachers. C).

(See Appendix

The project staff also indicated. that it expected to collect evidence of

thequaLiiication's of the attendees through self-report measures and interjudge agreements.

Little in the way of interjudge agreement was attempted.

Self-

report measures were collected in the form of an attitudinal instrument developed by the project staff.

This attitudinal survey was administered by the project

staff on a pre -post basis once before the first workshop and again the week of 28 May 1973.

These data have not yet been supplied to the E'8, and therefore

are not included here.

Finally E's conducted a survey 6f attendees seeking their impressions of the impact of the workshops.

The results of this survey. are given along with

the survey questions in Table 1. of the workshops was very good,

This table showsthat the general. reception There were particularly strong responses

indicating the value of small group discussions at the workshops and suggesting that the workshops created more positive attitudes toward the concept of career education.

Somewhat lesSsatisfaction was shown with the organization of the

workshops, and use of audio visuals, but in general the average rating for the workshops, and use of the areas at issue was moderately to strongly positive. The strongest points about the workshops seemed to be the opportunity of working closely and cooperatively with others and sharing experiences and ideas. The most frequent criticism was that the workshops were not as well organized as they might have been.

Finally the workshops were seen as stimulating a

number of different kinds of activities related to career education including writing exercises, interviews.and visits by various workers:and distutsions and role playings about various careers.

In summary, the project staff have been substantially successful in attaining Goal I. Goal II - Student .impact _A,

Method - Students will participate in the execution-O___,

progrram as designed. B.

the

.,

Expected results - Students_will_display increased self

awareness and career awareness. Data collected Full. descriptions of the treatment (,program) in each school (see

Appendix A, Component Program Descriptions and Appendix B, Summary of School Observations were developed over. the period.of the year.

These show that the

treatments planned were carried out essentially as they had been conceived.

10

Table I

Workshop Survey Results

Please think about your experiencetrwith the Career Education Work hops during this past year.

Below are a number of statements concerning these

workshops. _Please respond to each statement in terms of your overall impresII x11

sion of nll of these workshops which you attended by drawing an the appropriate letters for each statement.

through

SA - Strongly Agree_

The codes are:'

A - Agree'` No opinion

D - Disagree SD - Strongly Disagree The use of small group discussions at the Workshops was very helpful..

SA

2.

The symposia were of great value.

SA. ti

3.

The lecture presentations were. very helpful.

4.

A

N

-

D

SD

A

N

D

SD

SA

A

N

D

SD

Audio-visual presentations were used wherever they might have:helped.

SA

A

N

D

SD.

5.

The Workshops made appropriate use of community resources and participants.

SA

A

6.

The overall organization of the. WorkshopD. Was very well done.

SA

A 6-

N

I felt that the participants in the 'Workshops accomplished a great deal of useful work.

SA

A

I felt that I gained a great deal of knowledge from my attendance at the Workshops which I will be able to use. in my schoOl work.

SA

As a result of these Workshops I have a more positive attitude toward the coneel!t of Career Education.

SA

1.

7.

8.

9.

10.

/2- 7

.

I _felt that the Workshops offered me a good opportunity to express my ideas and opinions on-Career Education.

6 r (..: 3

Ce

Co.

-7

(O

/

D

SD

D 2-

-SD

Z.

N

D

SD

N

D

SD

N

D

SD

N

D

SD

:!=-N

/C.)

A (p

A

1

12 tO .

Table 1 (Continued)''

.%

11.

The Workshops were too long to be effective. _

12.

S

A

N

D.:

SD

D

SD

/.4

.

I have already applied much 'that I learn6d in the course of the Work-

hop. 13.

I would 'recommend more inservice training of this type with regard to Career Education, at an early

S

A

...r1

D

SD

I expect that the Career Education Project will have a significant and positive impact on school children.

S

A

N

D

SD

/0

--

As a result of the Workshops, I intend to emphasize Career Education to a greater degree in my work.

S

A

N

D

SD

date. 14.

1

a.

11: ---Please answer the following questions as briefly as possible:

,1.

What in your opinion was the strongest point about the Workshops you attended?

2.

What in your opinion was the weakest point about the Workshops?

3.

If possible, list three activities which you have undertaken as a direct result of your attendance at these.Workshops.

b.

C.

12

Table 1 (Continued) 1.

What in your opinion wan the strongest point about the Workshops you attended? Mont of those responding theught that the .strongest point, wnn the opportunity to work cooperatively with others to plan glas6room activities and the resource guide.

The next largest group liked the idea of teachers sharing experiences and ideas with each other. Others made comments generally supportive of the goals of career education. 2.

What in your opinion was the weakest point about the Workshop?

The most frequent criticism was that.the workshops were not as well organized as they should have been. The remaining comments were evenly distributed about; not liking the,evaluation, lack of: advance notice about the evaluation, not enough teachers attending and not enough opportunity for sharing of ideas. 3.

If possible, list three activities which you have undertaken as a direct result of your attendance at these Workshops.. .

Activities in order of frequency:

job research, filling out job applications and writing plays and songs about careers]

1.

Writing exercises [including:

2.

Interviews of and visits by various workers.

3.

Discussions and role play of careers.

4.

Incorporation of career education ideas into existing curriculum - a shift. in emphasis.

5.

Actual experiences [students volunteering for school jobs.; classroom jobs and simulated work situations]

6,

Field trips

7.

units on work, learning stations, use Other classroom activities such as: of audio-visual equipment and materials, self.and career awareness programs.

,-1.

.

Measurement ofcareer awareness and'self awareness Project staff agreed to define what was meant by the terms career

awareness and self awareness so that E's might attempt to find one or more

measuresappropriate to the assessment of.career and self awareness development.

Project staff submitted definitions of career awareness and self--

awareness as follows:

Self awareness - "Based upon knowledge of self, including abilities, skills, talents, interests and needs, the students will be able to describe and deMonstrate their various abilities and interests." Career awareness - "Includes knowledge of the family as a social

insatution, knowledge of some basic educational pre-requisites for a variety of career options, some knowledge about the range and nature of various job families, knowledge of various essentials for the maintenance of a democratic society <
opportunities and activities for self-fulfillment." It was agreed by all parties that it would not be possible to assess these concepts in. their full breadth.

Therefore aspects of each were selected.

The definition of self awareness was explicated into an instrument which permitted the assessment of self awareness according to a semantic differential. For the assessment of career awareness, the E's developed a matrix of standard occupations and descriptors to be applied to them about job preferences.

These activities are more fully described below along

with the results of their applications. Appendix D.

and collected paragraphs

The instruments may be found in

.

Career awareness

With respect to career awareness, it was originally planned that the

child would beasked to classify the occupation of the bread-winner of the family into one of 12 job clusters where the job clusters were indicated not by occupational. titles but'rather by functional descriptions oaf the kinds of iJ

'activities involved.

(Each of 12 or 13 occupational areas derived from the

literature would be described in terms of selected dimensions based on logical analysis by the project staff and by the evaluation team.)

Parents would then

be asked to.make a similar classificationand career awareness would be indicated by the extent to which the child's classification matched that of the parent.

14

This same task would be repented at the higher grade levels 4, at these grade levels an Additional task would be required.

5, and 6, but

Each student

would be linked to describehis career choices and why, and the responses would be examined and scored with respect to the number of critical dimensions of the occupation in question which were indicated in the child's response.

Career awareness, would be indicated by the extent to which the

child's reasons for career choice had something to do with the relevant critical dimensions which described the occupational grouping into whiCh his career choice fell.

After these plans were approved, the project staff was not able to develop a set of functional descriptions of various occupa:Aonal categories which had sufficient ,consistency to form the basis for the required instrument.

Then the staff coordinators in the city became reluctant to request children to describe the occupation of the breadwinner of the family since many welfare

families had no

breadwinners as such.

Therefore, the baseline data collection

on the career awareness dimension became hopelessly snarled, and a period of

discussion ensued which became sufficiently protracted hat the collection of baseline data became unfeasible.

As a compromise measure of career awareness, to be administered only on a post -test basis, the E's eventually developed a set of- "standard" (common)

occupations and "standard" descriptors of these occupations. .

The task then was

to ask the respondent to check those descriptors which typically applied to the occupation or usually applied to a person in that occupation.

(See Appendix D.)

As was true for the self-awareness Administration, a somewhat modified form of the instrument was administered for grades1 to 3 (Appendix D).

The

occupations and descriptors forming the basis for the grades 1 to 3 form were a subset of thOse administered to grades 4 to 6.

Project staff approved these

instruments and they became the bases for the collection of the only career awareness data directly solicited by the E's. collected by teachers.)

(Job preference paragraphs were

Administration was carried out indirectly through the

project coordinator and took place over the months of March, April, and.Mby of 1973. (This was a rather lengthy period of administration, but the E's had no power to control the schedule which was.dependent upon a variety of other activities associated with projects unrelated. to the Maryland Career Development Project.)

15

The E's did not feel that evaluation experts should be ask'to designate the appropriate keying for the career awareness instrument. Consequently a'key was, contrived by asking several of the project staff

to mark the instrument according to the directions, indicating the appropriate descriptors for each occupation.

Student scores were then obtained by com-

paring student responses to the Consensus Key derived from the responses of the project ,staff.

Simply stated, the task for the student was to indicate

whether or not the occupational descriptor applied, to each of the occupations.

A student score for an occupation was the percentage of all possible times for which his responses matched those on the Consensus Key.

Matches were

considered to be obtained where the key was not marked and the student did

not respond to a particular descriptor for a given occupation, as well as in those instances in which both the student and the key marked a descriptor.

Thus the student score for a given occupation was simply the percentage of total number of opportunities for choice. in which his choices matched those

of the key. ,A student's overall score was obtained by taking the median of these percentages across'allof the occupations in the instrument.

Thus a

"student!s score" is a median percentage of match across the'standard set of occupations,

Obviously the higher the student's score,the more "career-aware"

the student may be expected to be. As well as the student scores described above, the E's also calculated occupational median percentages across classes.

These occupational snedian per-

centages are comprised of the student's scores for, a single occupation taken

over all students in a class.

The occupational medians provide an indication:

of-the extent to which various of these "standard" occupations are known to the students.

In addition to'the above analyses, two sets of overall medians were obtained, the. class medians that is the median of all students overall occupations for a given class,

the median of the student's .scores; and the

median occupation' score, taken-over all classes, for primary classes and for intermediate classes.

These medians permit the comparison of classes and

occupations on a overall baSis. There were 19 teachers in 8 elementary schools who participated in the program.

One of these teachers left the school system during the year,' so

that the base number of teachers for the elementary coMponent was 18.

16

All 18

teachers Aupplicd the career awareness data for their students, which was collected into in the academic year..

Table

2

presents the median primary

student scores for each occupation by class and the-class medians. .

Table 3

presents the occupational medians over all classes in primary and all classes in intermediate grades.

Nogrand medians taken over all elementary, classes

-were computed, since it was felt that the age differential between primary and intermediate prohibited such a, comparison.

The overall Medians for priMary grades show that the class medians

ranged from 70 to 80% and that occupational medians for the 8 occupations included in this level of. the test also ranged from, 70 to 80%.

Furthermore

the table shows that there was relatively little variation around these means either within class across occupations or within occupation across classes.. The highest_percentages.of correct match.for occupations were for truck driver, nurse, and store clerk.

Two Of the nine primary classes.had medians of 80%,,

three of 75%, and the remainder of 70%.-' It. will be noted from Table

2

that the minimum class by occupa-

tion median shown is 60, which occurs for athlete, class A; teacher, class N; and musician and_mechanic, class E.

The highest scores are 90 scored by class

D for truck driver, nurse, and store clerk; by classQ for nurse, and by class F for teacher and store clerk.

One of the more notable features of these data is the comparative uniformity of the scores across classes and occupations.

To some extent,

this appears to be a function of thenature of the test and the-scoring system which was used.

There is a tendancy in the scoring system for nonresponse to

be'counted as a match.

However the only alternative to this condition would

have been to use a much more complicated response system which would have pro -

longed the administration of the tests' and undoubtedly have reduced the validity of student responses due to fatigue and boredom.

Therefore it should be kept

in mind that these scores possibly .over- represent the degree of career

awareness of the various students, but nonetheless are probably of reasonable validity from a comparative standpoint.

It-should'also be noted that an examination of the within class distributions (not presented here for reasons of space) indicated that the individual student scores did indeed exhibit a rather considerable range

17

co

I-.

.

70%

80

70%

75

75%

Mechanic

Median

70

70

70

Musician

:

70

70

80

Store Clerk

80

70

'70

70

Construction Worker

60

80%

85

70

90

80

70

90

80

70

80

80

Nurse

70

70

70

60

70

Athlete

90

2nd

80

2nd

Teacher

80

1st

80

1st

Truck Driver

Class

Grade

.

!I

70%

60

-

70

75%

75%

70 -

80

70

70

70

70

.70

--75

60

70

80

90

70

70

.30

80

2nd

80

2nd

80

70

80

70

70

2nd

Career Awareness - Primary Medians

Table 2

80%

80.

70

90

75

90

S80

80

80

3rd

70%

80

65

70

70

80

80

70

70

3rd

Table 3

Career Awareness - Occupational Medians

Over all medians - Primary Truck Driver

80%

Athlete

707.

Nurse

80%

w Teacher

70%

Construction Worker

.70%

Store Clerk

80%

Musician

70%

Sechanic

80%

Over all medians - Intermediate 70.0%

Seamstress

63.3%

64.95%

Store Clerk

66.6%

Computer Worker

63.3 %.

70.0%.

Cashier

66.6%

70,0%

Social Worker

63.3%

Nurse

70.0%,

Cook

63.3%

Telephone Operator

60.0%

nnetorin^r1-4,31-

56.6%

Outside Salesman

66.6%

Stewardess

66.6%

Lawyer

68.3%

Bus/Truck Driver

60.0%

Factory Worker

63.0%

Construction Worker

63.3%

Teacher

66.6%

Fireman

60.0%

Shopkeeper

66.6%

Policeman/Woman

60.0%

Waiter/Waitress

66.6%

Mailman

63.3%

Artist.

66.6%

Musician/Entertainer

60.0%

Appliance Repairman

63.3%

Mechanic

63.3%

Office Clerk

63.3%

Athlete

63.3%

Secretary ;

RepOrter/Newspaperman Barbler/Beautician

Custodian ''Sanitary Worker

A

-70.0%

19

within each of the occupations for essentially all classes. this conclusion, Exhibits 1

and

2

To illustrate

show frequency polygons for the com-

bined class distributions for the primary and intermediate.groups, respectively, taken over all the occupations.

(The individual occupational distributions are

not presented for, reasons of space, but show similar variation.)

The exhibits

present a good picture of the distribution of career awareness at the elementary level.

For example, class A-had student scores all the way from 40 to 100i with

most of the scores included in the range of 50 to 90.

The E's are of the

opinionthat an adequate variance in the individual scores was obtained on these tests.

On the basis of the.data shown above, the E's can only conclude that the primary teachers have been doing an excellent lob in familiarizing the

students with the general characteristics of the 8 selected standard occupations included in this awareness instrument.

There are as may be expected a handful

of students in each of the classes for whom knowledge about these jobs is sketchy,

but the bulk of the students seem to have acquired an awareness of about 70 to 80% of the attributes of these occupations.

Turning now to the intermediate level career awareness results(Table 4), we see. that the occupation means for each class are again relatively and rather uniformly high.

IL can be seen at a glance that the medians for these students

range somewhat "lower than those for the primary Students, but it should be

remembered that these student scores are based upon 3 times as many occupational-

descriptor-(30 instead of.10) as compared to the primary level test.

These

medians range from a low of about 47 (the only class med4an in the 40's for an occupation) to a high of about 82; the 47 being for class L for doctor/dentist and the 82 for stewardess for class J.

There are two others in the 80's, that

for barber/beautician for class J and sanitary worker for class J.

The class

medians for the intermediate group range from about 60 to about 72, with classes M and J in the 70's and classes L and P at the 60 level, the remaining in beilwen.

classes

The occupational medians for the intermediate groups are again found

in a very narrow range (56-707).

The highest include secretary, barber/beautician,

custodian, sanitary worker and nurse.

The lowest include doctor/dentist, telephone

operator, bus/truck driver, fireman, policeman, and musician/entertainer,

(Whil'e

these latter occupations are among the more popular choiceS of the students, it

is obvious that they have some misconceptions about what.is involved in them.).

20

0

20 10

40

'60

260 240 220 200 180 160 140 120 100 80

680 660 640 620 600 580 560 540 520 500 480 460 440 420 400 380 360 340 320 300 280

f

10%

20%

30%

407

Exhibit 1

PercentageSCorrect

50%

Primary

60%

70%

Career Awarenc.Ss - Frequency Distributions

80%

90%

100%

1.3

0

60 40 20 10

440 420 400 380 360 340 320 300 280 260 240 220 200 180 160 140 120 100 80

460.

680 660 640 620 600 580 560 540 520 500 480

10

13.3

16.6

20.0

23.3

26.6

30.0 33.3

36.6 40.0

46.6

50.0

53.3

56.6

Exhibit 2

Percentage Correct

43.3

Inte=ediate

60.0

63.3

66.6

70.0

Career Awareness - Frequency Distributions

73.3

76.6 80.00

83.3

86.6

90.0

93.3

96.6 100

t..)

sa

63.3

74.95

76.6

61.65

63.3

63.3

63.3

Artist

70.0

70.0 63.3

56.6

61.65

60.0 66.6

66.6

74.95

73.3

Waiter/Waitress

V

63.3

63.3

60.,0

66.6

66.6

71.65

70.0

73.3

Shopkeeper

63.3 63.3 73.3

64.95 66,6

63.3

66.6

Teacher

66.6

53.3

66.6 56.6

54.95

73.3

66.6

68.3

Factory Worker

66.6

63.3

66.6 66.6

71.65

73.3

70.0

Lawyer

64.95

70.0

60.0 63.3 63.3

61.65

73.3

60.0

70.0

71.65

56.6

73.3

64.95

Outside Salesman

61.65

73.3

66.6 54.95

60.0

66.6

70.0

63.3

Telephone Operator

66.6 70.0

70.0

-

70.0 66.6

70.0

66.6 66.6

63.3

Nurse

64.95

60.0

66.6

73.3

54.95

F

66.6

(

5th

L

6th

R

4th

66.6

68.3

68.3

-

80.0

76.6

70.0

Sanitary Worker 73.3

63,3

64.95

73.S'

70,0

66.6

Custodian

73.3

63.3

70.0

80.0

73.3

66.6

Barber/Beautician

66.6

60.0

64.95

70.0

70.0

SS

64.95

Reporter/ Newspaperman

-

60.0

73.3

70.0

70.0

70.0

Secretary

Class

K

I

J

M

H

6th

5th

6th

Grade;

4th

5th

Career Awareness - Intermediate Medians

Table 4

53.3

70.0

64.95 53.5

61.65-

66.6

Cook

-

56.6

63.3

63.3

70.0

60:0

uonstruction Worker

Fireman

Policeman/ Woman

56.6

56.6

63.3

Bus'Truck Driver

66.6

70.0

Stewardess

1:-DoCtor/Dentist

56.6 60.0

66.6

60.0

56.6

66.6

78.3

64.95

60.0

56.6

66.6

66.6

Social Worker

81.65

60.0

70.0

73.3

70.0

Cashier

56.6

56.6

68.3

66.6

71.65

64.95

63.3

70.0

66.6

73.3

Store Clerk

66.6

56.6

70.0

66.6

73.3

Seamstress

:COmputer Worker

54.95

5th

63.3

5th

70.0

6th

66.6

4th

Appliance Repairman

Class

Grade

Table 4 "(Continued)

60.0

61.65

63.3

56.6

70.0

66.6

58.3

63.3

63.3

56.6

60.0

56.6

60.0

6th

50.0

56.6

56.6

58.3

58.3

56.6

6165

70.0

63.3

54.95

54.95

64.95

53.3

53.3

56.6

56.6

63.3

60.0

66.6

60.0

60.0

5t1_,

71.65

46.6

46.6

63.3

63.3

66.6

66.6

63.3

60.0

66.6

66.6

63.3

63.3

66.6

63.3

56.6

70.0

L

R

66.6

Ot-b.

4th

61.65

70.0 71.65

70.0 70.0

63.3

66:6

Office Clerk

Athlete

Median

,)

56.6

71.65

56,6

66.6

60.0

71.65

56.6

5th

66.6

tMechanic

66.6

56.6

Musician/ Entertainer

.

70.0

68.3

Mailman

5t'n

73.3

tith

71.65.

.

60,0

Class

Grade

4th

Table 4 (Continued)

63.3

66.6

58.3

56.6

61.65

56.6

6th

6.66

73.3

70.0

66.6

66.6

66.6

4th

60.0

73.3

73.3

73.3

68.3

80.0

6th

.

60.0

53.3

56.6

60.0

54.95

56.6

5th

Again the E's feel that the conclusion is warranted that rather good progress is being made by these teachers in acquainting their students with the critical occupational descriptors characteristics of a fairly wide range of occnpations.

It will be remembered that there are some 30-occupations. and 30

descriptors involved in this career awareness exercise and that in general the various classes are able to match judgments with respect to the presence .or absence. of a descriptor with the consensus key in many more than half the cases

and_in Most instances with 2/3s or more of the descriptors.

For, example, the

median performance for class M with respect to "social worker" is a match with the consensus key of 20 out of 30 of the descriptors in the instrument.

Some additional information about career awareness exists in the form of paragraphs written by intermediate elementary students.

These paragraphs were

in response to the assignment of about writing a paragraph about "what I want to do and why".

Table 5

summarizes the analysis nf these paragraphs in terms of

the number of occupations that were mentioned and a summary of the reasons that the students gave for the occupation chosen.

It may be noted that tue most

popular occupations In these paragraphs by far were nurse, teacher,. sports

performer and entertainment performer.

Office worker, postman, artist and model

and protective worker were mentioned a number of times (6 to 9), but the remaining .choices were.scattered over a wide variety of occupational choices from steel worker to President of the United States.

The reason given by the students for their choices was predominantly "likirw. the duties involved", given 204 times by 117 students.

(Of course the

students may not understand clearly what duties are involved in their oncupationaI choices.)

Next most prominent reasons include "it helps others or (family)";"like

the people you work with"; "money"; and "it's fun or'interesting or I just like it".

In general, the E's feel that the level of career awareness displayed in these data is quite substantial.

It, is to be regretted that a pre-post com-

parison was not possible under the constraints which affected-the conduct of the evaluation.

Self awareness As indicated earlier, the E's developed a semantic differential

measure of self awareness following Osgood.* *

Project staff indicated several

Osgood, C.E., Suci, G.J., and Tannenbaum, P.H. -The :measurement of meaning. The University of Illinois Press, 1957.

Urbana:

26

-"*"

Table 5

Results of Career Awareness Intermediate Paragraphs (What I Want to Do and Why)

Number Choosing

D.O.T Occupational Categories Professional, technical, managerial nurse

20

.doctor

5

28

teacher artist writer lawyer

7

2 1

architect principal (school) computer operator

2 1

2

interior, decorator President of U.S., scientist

1 2 .

mathematician dentist

2 1

Clerical and Sales office worker cashier telephone operator sales lady Service' Occupations policemaii/womam

beautician stewardess serviceman-military

4

fireman waitress cook

6

babysitter postman

2

3 1

2

4 1

Farming, fishery and. related

dog raiser

27

Table 5 (Continued)

D.O.T Occupational-Categories

Number Choosing

Processing none chose

Machine Trade steel worker. mechanic

1

5

Bench Work repairman

1

Structural

construction worker house painter

1

Miscellaneous sports performer model

29 13

9

driver .

5

housewife government worker

3 1

.. 28

Tnble 5 (Continued)

Times Used

AReasons I.

By How Mnny Students

Reasons having to do with the skills involved in the j ob

I already have some of the skills required

25

I want to learn/go to school

13

I am capable/I would be good

12

12

5

5

I like to do those duties involved

204

117

The job is fun /interesting / "like the job"

: 48

44

To improve myself

21 .

12

Reasons having to do with the actual duties of the job

Like things involved,(equipment

forexample)

Because it is difficult

3

,33

2

22

Because it is easy

11

III. Reasons having to do with the peopleyou work with I know someone in the field or friends also wish to do I like the peOple you work with IV.

44

39

For the money

44

42

To have/own things involved

11

9

For fame

23

20

9

9

10

10

'18

18

To be important

4

4

Like the location/setting

1

1

Reasons having to do with the rewards to be -gained by having that job

Would like to have the qualities of those fields

Nice/good-rife, home, family, happiness Because of the tiavel inVolved

29

.

dinsi,,nt to he covered by this self' awareness measure:

employabiliy'skills, and work settings.

physical, emotional,

Based on these categories and on a

review of Osgood, a series or simple adjective pairs were selected to formTbi;

poll'ir scales covering the four dimensions indicated by the project staff. 'At the'grades 1 to 3 level, a subset of the semantic differential tasks for the 4 to

(i

grades was selected in deference to the shorter attention spans and

more difficult administrative problems characteristic of younger, chl.dren.

At the grades 1-to-3-level, there were 12 hi-polar pairs which were And to the students; students were asked to mark their positions on the differential scales by X-ing out

ositions on the pictorial ladders. shown (see Appendix D).

At the grades 4 to 6 level, the more standard form of visual presentation and a longer test of 25 pairs was used (Appendix D).

Copies of the forms were

shown to project staff and to USOE personnel and approved by both.

Administra-

tion by classroom teachers was planned.for the week before Christmas vacation. Unfortnnately, administration was not carried out during that week as the.elementary

project coordinator failed to schedule it with ciSsroom teachers.

AS n

consequence, the baseline data collection occurred for the most part during the month of January.

Post-test administration was carried out during the

latter pout of May,

In order to provide a standard against which to compare the students'

self-ratings on the Sematic Differential, teachers were asked to rate each

student on the same set of adjeCtival.Nlirs accordingtO their own perceptions: of the student.

The Sematic.Differential distances were then calculated

I. between the student self-ratings and the teacher ratings

The prr'i4ure was

repeated at the post-test period, and these self-ratings were again compared to the original teacher ratings.

Increasing self awareness was defined as the-

diminution of the average distance between student and teacher ratings from base-

jine to post-test measure.

That is, those students from whom the Sematic

Differential distance between their own self-ratings and their' teachers ratings descreased:were-defined as having increased their level of self awareness.

Of the 18 teachers who supplied the career awareness data, 5 did not supply. complete self'awareneas data for their students.

Of these 5 teachers,

1 refused to administer the self awareness instrument at both the pre-test and post-:test administrations

(this teacher' also refused to allowthe E's to

observe in her clasp), and 3 administered thc. instrument to the students

but failed to fill out their on ratings.

One teacher had administered

the'instrument at the pre-test adminiilpration, but did not administer it

at the,post-test administration.

Therefore the Semantic Differential6 which

are reported as measures of student self awareness, and discussed in a later section, are based upon data aupplied by'13 teachers for their respective 13 classrooms.

It should be further pointed out.that although it.was originally planned to colleCt teacher ratings as the standard of comparison at both the pre-lost and the post-test administrations of the self-awareness instru-

ment, it was subsequently decided (in order to conserve the good will of the teachers in the project) to use the pre -test teacher ratings as the bases of

comparison for both pre- and post-test administrations of the student measure of self awareness.

This seemed defensible as the teachers had plenty of

time to get to know their students before the first administration.

It should be recalled that the semantic differential descrbes the "distar,,ce" between the.student self-rating and the teacher ratings of the

student across a number of "dimensions" defined by bi-polar word pairs.

Tables 6.and 3 present the distributions of the semantic distances (D's) for the students in each of the 13 classes, based only on complete data (students for whom data for both administrations was available). based on ungrouped data.

The :means shown are

COmposite frequency polygons for primary and inter-

mediate groups are shown in Exhibits 3

and

4

, respectively.

Table 8

presents the results Of the analyses of the sematic differentials", individually by classes.

The D-bars shown are the average student distance froM the teacher

at the-first and second administrations of the test respectively. .Delta-bar

of D shows the mean of the differencesbetween first and second administrations over the students in the class, and therefore is equal to the difference of the means.

The next column shows the standard deviation Of.the differences and

the final columns indicate the results of two significance tests.

The results of the significance tests might best be described as mixed,

Student's t was used to test the hypothesis.that the mean difference

between first and,second administrations.was zero.

This hypothesis was rejected

at about the 57..leveI:Ot better for five'Of the 13 classes - -an encouraging result,

considering the barely three month period existing between-administrations.

Thus,

0

2

4

6

8

12 10

20 18 16 14

24 22

30 28 26

34 32

38 36

46 44 42 40

48

-50

60 58 56 54 52

3.95

post test

= prd test

2.95

/

/

4.95

/

/

/

/

\

5.95

/\

\

6.95

\

\ \

'

\

8.95

Exhibit 3

S6ore

7.95

\

Primary

9.95

10.95

Frequency Distributions - Self.Awareness

11.95

12.95

13.95

2 0

4

6

10 8

16 14 12

26 24 22 20 18

60 58 56 54 52 50 48 46 44 42 40 38 36 34 32 30 28

3i-.95

post test

= pre test

2.95

4.95

5.95

6.95

8.95

Exhibit 4

Score

'7.95

Intermediate

9.95

- "10.95

Frequency Distributions - Self Awareness

11.95

12.95

13.95

0

0

11.5 - 12.4

10.5 - 11.4

-.

.a.-

I

0

24

4.4

3.5 -

2.5 - .3.4

N

Ungrouped Mean

6

3

7.25

6.69

24

0

5

6-66

21

-

0

3.

6.52

21,

1

4

4

6.38

23

0

2

10

5.53

23

-

4

8

2

1

5.4

2

6

4

4.5 -

8

6

2

3

9

5

'6.4

5

4

5.5

5

6

7.4

'

1

0

0

0

0

6.5 -

0

0

0

0

0.

Post

2nd

C

8.4

3,i

0

0

0

Pre

2nd

C

7.5 -

0

0

0

0

Post

1st

B

9.4

1

0

0

Q

0

Pre

1st

B

8.5 -

3

0

12.5 - 13.4

La 9.5 - 10.4

0

13.5 - 14.4

D - Scores

Pre --71-56St

Pre. or Post?

1st.

1st

Grade

A

A

Class

7.26

25,

2

0'

2

11

7

2

1

0

0

0

Pre

2nd.

D

6.63

25

-

0

8

4

2

0

0

0

0

0

Post'

2nd

D

7.60

25

-

0

2

6

3

0

0

0

Pre

2nd

E

7.97

25

-

0

5

3

9

0

0

0

Post

2nd

E

15

-

0

1

3

5

2

0

0

0

Pre

3rd

F

6.55

Primary Self Awareness - f Distributions by Class

Table ,6

F

7.97

15

-

1

2

1

8

3

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Pest

3rd

,,,-

6.26

28

-

0

3

5

7

if

5

0

0

0

0

0

Pre

3rd

G :

28

-

0

3

5

7.

8

4

1

0.

0

0

0

161

-

0

11

19

31

47

36

11

6

0

0

0

0

Pre

6.75

161

12

24

46

38

18

17

3

0

0

Post

Total Pri=ary

6.87

Post

3rd

6.38

.

G

um

.

5.4

4.4

3.4

4.5 -

3.5 -

2.5 -

Ungrouped Mean

N

6.4

5.5 -

8.38

25

0

0

5

.8.21

25

0

6

7.4

6.5

4

8.4

7.5 -

6

4'

9.4-

8.5 -

5

4

9.5 - 10.4

1

10.5 - 11.4

1

0

1

-12.5 -13.4

1/.5 - 12.4

0

13.5 - 14.4

1

Post

Pre

Pre or Post?

D-- Scores.

4th

4th

H

Grade

'

H

Class

8.03

25

2

3

0

0

0

Pre

5th

I

7.67

25

6

1.

0

0

Post

5th

I

6.84

32

10

6

3

0

Pre

5th

J

6.77

32

1

4

11

0

1

8.02

25

0

3

5

4

2

1

Pre

6th

50 Post-

K

J

0

C

1

4

3

5

7

1

3

8.35

25

'

1

0

Post

6th

K

8.13

21

0

0

1

5

3

-5

2

2

2

1

0

Pre

6th

L

.

20

0

0

4

3

3

4

5

0

1

0

0

Post'

6th

6.94

-:

L

Intermediate Self Awareness - f Distributions by Class

Table 7

30

0

2

1

10

6

3

2

3

2

0

1

Pre

7.45

.

6th

M

6.94

30

0

0

4

10

7

5

2

2

0

0

0'

Post

6th

M

-

7.73

152

0

3

8

37

29

29

19

13

9

2

3

Pre

.

7.4

152

0

1

14

1/ .4

32

32

31

8

8

1

1

Post

Inter=edf:ate

Total

Table

8

Summary of Self-Awareness Semantic Differential Mears (Based Upon Complete Cards Only) Significance Class

A N = 24 B

Grade

D1

D2

Sign

1

7.25

6.69

.56

2.12

1

'6.66

' 6.52

.14

1.88

2

6.38

5.53

.85

1.43

.005

2

7.26

6.63

.63

1.62

.05

2

7.60

8.00

-.40

1.21

N = 21 C

N = 23 D

N = 25 E

.05

.05

.02

N = 25

)

F

3

6.55

5.69

.86

3

6.26

6.38

-.12

1.76

4

8.38

8.21

.17

1.61

8.03

7.67

.36

1.55

5

6.84

6.77

.07

1.01

6

8.02

8.35

-.33

1.18

2.29.

'N = 15 G

N = 28 H

N=25 I

N = 20 j 32

K N = 25

I..

L

6

8.13

7.33

.80

.88

7.45

6.94

.51

1.45

NI= 2u

N is 30

.055

.02

.05

these classes exhibited, on the average, some movement toward increased self-

awareness.. 'TheSign Test, although-a less powerful test, was also employed order to determine the uniformity of the effect which seemed to exist. Results here were not no encouraging.

In most cases, the number of student

increases in self. awareness.was about the same as the number of decreases'and no-changes.

In ,one instance a. significant number of decreases was found, and

in only two instances was a significant number of increases found.

These results suggest that the program was certainly not uniformly successful, as implemented, in achieving improved self awareness--either from class to class, or from student-to-student;

Classes A and L apparently achieved

A substantial and general impact on the students.'

Classes C, D, and M were

considerably successful with some students, but not with others; while Class

Esucceeded in decreasing the self awareness of most of Its'students.

A further

datum in support of the variability of,the effect of the program from class to class is the considerable difference in the standard deviations shown the Table.

Such results however arenot unexpected.

It would be unlikely for a

program to be equally successful.as applied by all teachers, or with respect. to all students.

The E'S searched their records of obServations in the classrooms

for clues as to the reasons for these differential effects, but without success. Differences may be personal and were too Subtle to be identified.

However,

beneficial effects of the program were achieved in some cases, and this is salutary.

Although the distributions of the D's have relatively little absolute meaning, it might be noted that the measurement:procedure produced very reasonable distributions, which were quite similar from class to class. as indirect evidence of the value of the procedure.

This may be taken

In general, the intermediate

students averaged somewhat higher scores than did the primary studentA, but in view of the fact that their scores were based upon twice as many bi-polar scales, this pay be taken as evidence of increasing self awareness as a funttion of age (as would be expected from maturational considerations).

The frequency polygons

suggest that the primary group as a whole benefited more from the program than

did the intermediates, though this is nota significant difference and must be 'subjected to further study.

37

Overall, the program demonstrated a positive impact on student selfawnrenesS in selected instaneeS.

This is regarded as an achievement in view of

the comi[derable administrative d).Efieul.ties Involved in the measurement, and

in view of the limILed interval between administrations of the instTNvent. Without control groups,..it is impossible to attribute the merfsured effects to

the provnm unequivocally.

However, the E's feel that real program effects

existed.

Tn .summary, theE's feel that the Project made good progress toward the achievement of Goal 11, though clearly some students are not being reached; Coal III - Resource'Development A.

Method - In-service training participants will develop;

project staff and others to review. B.

._

Expected results - Complete draft of resource guide for I

career awareness programs in the elementary school, reviewed and in -rendiness for field testing. Dnta collected

The development of the'resource guide was a project primarily of the elementary component' coordinator.

In addition, it was. made the subject of the A

career education workshops for the elementary teachers, with part of their work\

shop activities being devoted to the 'preparation and examination.of units and The coordinator compiled and edited much of this material,

aspects of this guide.

... ..

E's tespOnsibilitics.to this goal were to monitor progress and to compare-the guide as produced'to that planned. An outline of the resource guide as originally. planned (December 1972) is shown in Exhibit 5

..

As'c'E mid-MarCh, a revised outline of the career educa-

tion resource guide had been received by the evaluators.

Planstoincludeee-

tions on the evaluation of curriculum and hoW to write behavior objectives had been .dropped and somesuggestions for using teacher-made materials. had been added to the outline.

As of-mid-March, all portions of the guide currently stated in

the outline had been completed or were about to be cOmpleted..

At that time, it,

appeared that the guide would be .completed on schedule; though the final. guide

was delayed until 8June'1973, due to the process of internal review. The final draft of .the Guide exhibits some significant, changes.from,

the outline presented in December, or its subsequent.Modifications.

Exhibit 6

'presents the lable of Contents which may be compared with the outline shown in

Exhibit 5

Outline Career Education Resource Book

Overview of Career Education A.

Definition

B.

Goals-Outcomes

C.

Elementary School Emphasis 1. 2.

self-awareness career-awareness

Curriculum Analysis and Modification A.

Interdisciplinary approach

B.

Learning Stations

C.

Role Playing - work

D.

Evaluation.

III. Community Resources A.

Identification 1. 2.

B.

Effective Utilization 1. 2.

IV.

Business, Labor, Industry, Community organization Suggested guidelines for developing and maintaining Community Resources

Field trips Resource people

Teacher and Commercially Built Materials A.

Suggestions for using audio-visual equipment effectively Examples: 1. 2.

3.

B.

V.

VI.

Instamatic camera Video take camera, recorder, and monitor Cassette recorder

Suggestions for using films, library books, etc.

Evaluation A.

Teacher designed "tests" of student behaviors-how to write behavioral objectives.

B.

Suggested interest tests

C.

Teacher-student performance contracting

D.

Program evaluation (long range-based on outcomes)

Program' References and Bibliography

39

Exhibit 6

Table of Contents - Respurce Notebook

Foreword Acknowledgments

OVERVIEW OF CAREER EDUCATION Definition Goaln

CURRICULUM ANALYSIS AND MODIFICATION Interdisciplinary Approach Early Level - Sample. Unit

Middle Level - Sample Unit Later Level - Sample Unit Sample Lessons 1-6

Career Education Activities That Create Interest.in Reading Subject Area Approach Social Studies.

Language Arts Math Health and Safety Science

Economics

Learning Stations - (samples) Role Playing - (samples) Interviewing - (samples) Leisure Time 'Activities

40

Exhibit 6 (Continued)

Development of Manipulative Skills in Career Education COMMUNITY RESOURCES

ReSouree Person File° Resource Speakers Senior. Citizens as Resource People

Field Trips USE OF' AUDIO-VISUAL MATERIALS

EVALUATIVE TECHNIQUES Suggested Interest Tests Program Zvaluation

Bibliography Films

Books

41

Exhibit 5

It is obvious that a great deal of work has gone into thin Guide,

and that it contains a compilation of approaches and activities which may be of significant value to the teacher interested in teaching career education in the classroom.

However, there are sonic very significant defects in the

present version of this Guide.

The most important of these is organizational.

There is n woeful lack of transitional and explanatory material which is needed by the reader to understand the contents of the Guide.

There is even

some difficulty in deciding in which of the sections listed in the Table of Contents one is reading.

Much of the volume'is made up of the work of obviously'

different people, inconsistently presented in a variety of formats, with no effort made to explain the differences or identify sources for the various topics .presented.

There is great variability in the thoroughness with which the various

topics are treated.

For example,about half a page is devoted to the use of

audio-visual materials in career education; whereas five pages are spent on the use of the Field Trip.

The amount of space which is-devoted to the sample

lessons and units appears to be overly long.

Finally, some of the topics which

were present in the mid-March outline have not appeared in the final draft, or have been sharply curtailed.

These were notably in the Evaluation section, and

with reference to teacher-made, and particularly commercially available materials. In summary, the Resource Guide appears to have a great deal of potential value for the teacher interested in career education.

However, a

great deal of work is still necessary to complete the development, introduce consistency of content and format, and provide a workable organization for this Guide.

Thus this Goal has only been partially met.

Summary Evaluation of Elementary Component via Interviews In order to get a "user's" perspective on the elementary component,

it was decided that the participating teachers should be interviewed in addition to having discussions with the project staff.

These interviews were carried out

in the late spring of 1973, in small groups in each of the eight schools participating.

A brief interview schedule was used in order to assure that

the interview discussions covered all of the topics of interest to the E's, (See Appendix D for the interview form.)

The discussion was allowed to range

through them in any order and to cover any other topicswhich may have been on the minds of the teachers.

Most of the teachers in the elementary component were

interviewed in this process.

2%.

42

The results of these interviews may be summarized briefly as follows:

Most of the teachers felt that career education is something which has been there all along, but that their present efforts strike at career education in greater depth then before.

They described it as really

a difference in emphasis -- there is more time and attention paid to integrating the career into the curriculum.

There are differences focused on

the deliberate effbrt to make the child aware of the possibilities in the world of work, and to emphasize the choices and the values of various careers.

Participating in the Maryland Career Education Project has foster-

ed this chhnge in teaching emphasis.

Teachers seemed to feel that children have become quite aware about careers and the world of work and have demonstrated this by wider vocabularies,' increased activities, and projects, and more understanding, more expressiveness, more opinions, and more realism.about themselves and the world of work. There is general agreement that the Baltimore administration supporte\career .education.

There is further agreement that the resource person for the pro-

ject: served a strong function and came whenever she was notified she was needed.

however there was some feeling that the coordinator did not have

enough time to adequately serve all the schools, and did not have perhaps as much in the way of resources behind her as would have been useful.

AS is

true of many new school programs, there were difficulties in getting appropriate resources.

Most teachers felt that the program was important enough to be continued whether or not there were difficulties in getting appropriate resources.

Most teachers felt that the program was important enough to be continued whether or not there was additional Federal support for it.

In

general, the consensus was that they plan to continue to teach it; that they would teach it or expand it without additional support; and that all schools

and most grade leVelsshould be involved.

There were several comments to the

effect that teachers not formally involved with the program have picked it up, so that whole faculties have become involved with career education.

43

The biggest objections seemed to concern priorities and the way in which the program interfered with the previously established schedules.

(As alwaya this program hash:ad to compete for the time and attention of the teachers and students with many other programs.)

Other problems with

the program included the evaluation process wherein teachers felt that they 'should have had more input to it, and that There should have been more pre, planning for it .(E's agree heartily.)

The evaluation would have been much

more effective had it been incorporated in.project planning from the beginning, taking advantage of teacher inputs as well as the inputs of Baltimore administrators,

In- service training and workshops were seen as strong plus

factors for the program.

However more in the way of stlidy guides, more or

more fvequeatl, workshops, and more in-service training were cited as desirable.

Comments and criticisms ranged from "this is a much needed program" to "we need more money, more buses, and more resource persons" to "now they children know why they come to school".

The E's conclude that the net impact of the efforts of the Maryland Career Development Project with respect to the participating teachers has been highly positive.

Of course many programs have been seen favorably by

teachers without student impact, but few have produced significance gains without teacher support.

The MCDP has clearly gained significant teacher

support for its elementary programs. Junior High School Component Goal I - Development and Field Test of a Pilot Exploration Model A.

Method - Project staff will 'draw uppn previous work on this

project, the Baltimore City Task Force and Career Education, Project

.

Go, Career Exploration Workshops, and the MdCormick Plan to'produce and implement. a model.

Plans for field testing will.be developed and

field testing will be carried out on a.representative sample of outdents from schools 7.2 and 80.

Plans for, implementation in 1973-74

will be prepared. B.

Expected results - A developed and field tested model for career

exploration at the Junior High School level will be ready for implementa'Eton for the school year 1973-74.

. 44

Data collected

00:February 15, 1973, project staff supplied an outline for the career education model.

copy of the model itself.

ApproxlMotely the first of June they supplied a E's task was Co review the model and its various

bases in the Baltimdre City Task Force on Career Education, educational ohje.clives, Project Go, the career exploration workshoPs, and the McCormick

effoyts.. A number of comments seem warranted about the model. First the model is not a Model in the scientific sense.

It is

basically-an amalgam of experiences with the Cooperative Work Experience Program at SchoOla.72 and '80, Project Go, the McCormick plan, the Career

Information Resource Center,.VIEW, and career development at Lemmel Junior .11igh SchoOl.

It lacks the explicit. statement of- principle6 and relationships

'which characterizes the .scientific model, and which enables the 'scientific

model to be Utilized for predictive purposes.

It is much mote'a. model in the

sense of.being a.tollection of guidelines and Suggestions for carrying out career education.

From this standpoint the "model" contains a great deal of

information which could be useful to the classroom teacher and the administrator who are dedicated to the improvement of career education opportunity..

It contains a series Of-goals.and objectives which are drawn heavily-from the Baltimore City Task Force, along with some definitions of career education and .some suggestions for organization and administration and the involvement

of staff, communities, andstudents.

A series of occupational .clusters is

spetified-,-- and these-materials are followed by a series of appendices cover-

ing some -o[ the activities of the programs.mentioned earlier.

A-serious defect in the opinioh of the E's with respect to this veldme-is

failure to develop .a theoretical framework or structure linking

the more or lees isolated and unrelated components of the-various prior projects on career development.

For example, a look at the outline supplied__

on 15 February indicates that '.here was to be a section descriptive of a

"comprehensive Junior high School career development program".

,This section

is not contained in the career exploration.-model as itpresently exists.'

it is just such an intergrative section, drawing selectively and in integrated -fashion on the experiences' and characteristics of the .variety of programs that

form the basis for the:career exploration model,,mhich is sorely needed.

This

defect is offset somewhat bY the'model'sdevelopment.of goals and o philosophy, the coordinator (new- to the Project this year) did a good job in building these...from available sources.-

135.

The goal, for the Career Exploration Model called for a field' tested model.

A part of the development of the Cooperative. Work. Experience

Program, at General. Henry Lee was the developmentof a series of teaching/ learning Packages under the McCormick program.

No field testing of the

model, per sc has been clone, with the exception of a very brief field test

of one of these teaching/rarning package units.

It should be pointed out

in passing t4t,pne (5i: the difficulties in field testing a model of the

kind which is presented here is the fact that it has little integral existence of.its own,' but is rather, a collection.of.these other plans.

To some extent these other plans have been field tested' in. the sense that

Project Co for example has been in operation for some time and subject to certain evaluations.

Similarily the Cooperative Work Experience Program.

at Schools 72 and 80 has been in operation and observedi for some period of time.

Hut these kinds of field testing are not field tests, of the

model, and cssPntially the model itself has not been field tested.

Thus,

this goal has not been realized, im.the opinion of the E's.

The teaching/learning package which was tried out was one of 43

packagdsee Exhibit

7

for a list of the teaching /learning units included.

in theMcCormickOlanVentitled Pleasant, Positive and Punctual.

It was

tre..d Out at Rock Glen Junior High School by the author, Mrs. L. RiTer. This tryout took'Tlace on 10, 11, and 14 May with 4' classes:

a low ability,

7th grade, an enriched 8th grade, a 9th grade work study class,. and a regular 9th grade. 'This unit-, was chosen by Mrs. Ritter because of its

appropriate length for a 3 -day program, and its apparent suitability asa tryout. unit.

Observer,s were invited to watch some of the tryout'classes

on these three days, and the E's prepared a brief reaction sheet for them to summarize their comments. ._Questions which were asked on the sheet and:

the results of the observer'scomments are shown in- Exhibit 8 It will be noted that there was a very small number. of observers

who responded to the reaction sheet, but that they felt in general that.the lesson wa s apprepriate'in.eontent and seasonably' appropriate in level for

the students they obServed.

They felt'again that the .lesson again was fairly r

successful in achieving student interest and uqderstanding, and that the process of the lesson should be.highly,generali6able to other students in .. other schools.

Something over 80% of the respondents approved-:the production

and dissemination of this 'approach for use in other schools. included' teachers, administrators

and an-areit'directOr.. 46

These observers

Exhibit 7

CONTENTS OF McCOHMICK PLAN. . .........

I.

II.

III.

Your Job This Year A:

"PaS'ISport to SUccese (How to work individually)

B.

"Getting Your Feet Wet" (practicing individualized instruction) 1.

Point system

2.

Grades

3.

Progreso reports

You A.

"You're Number One" (Your importance)

B.

"Just For You" (Your needs)

C.

"Putting It All Together" (You and your goals)

D.

"A Friend Is

" (You as a Friend)

Why People Work A.

"Why Get Up in the NOrning" (Socio-personal reasons)

1. 2.

initiative

pursue interest working conditions and hours

B.

IV.

"Frosting On The.Cake" (Economic reasons)

1.

insurance

2.

pay and.pay scale

3.

advancement

4.

promotion

5.

vacation

'6.

hospitalization

7.

pension

B.

stock options

How People ChooSe Jobs A.

"Whatever You Do Counts" (All jobs are impoytarit)

B,

"Looking Around" (Investigation of career areas)

C.

"Be Prepared" (Education) 1.

Academic - Vocational

D.

"Large and Small" (Kinds of Businesses

E.

"The Hunt" (Where to get jobs) 1.

classified ads

2.

employment agencies a.

state

b.. private

47

Exhibit 7 (Continued).

V.

VI.

Jobs Change A.

"When. America Was Young" (Jobs in the colonial era)

B.

"Farms to Factories" (Jobs during the Industrial Revolution)

C.

"Living Becomes Easier" (recent developments)

D.

"Tho Crystal Ball" (Trends)

How People Get Jobs

A.."First Steps" 1.

social security number

2.

calling for .appointment

writing .a letter for an appointment

VII.

VIII.

B.

"Getting It All Together" (application)

C.

"Put Your Best FoOt Forward" (interview) 1.

preparing for.

2.

getting to

3.

having

How People Keep Jobs A.

"Pleasant, Positive, Punctual" (attitudes)

B.

"How Much, How Well" (quantity and quality of work)

C.

"Yours, Lime, Ours"

D.

Responsibilities 1.

worker

2.

employer

Observation A.

"Job Menu"- (selecting job at McCormick's)

B.

"Doing Your Thing" (working at McCormick's)

C.

"'Rapping and 'Biting" (follow-up) 1.

reactions

2.

thank-you letter

IX. The Worker and His IniOme, A.

"Hateful,' But Helpful" (payroll deductionS)

1. Abxes. 2.

dues

3.

insurance

4.

-saviii-s, stocks, pension

.

...5.

loans

)(11ibit 7 (Continued)

D.

"Slicing the Pie" (budgeting)

C.

"Stretching the Dollar" (consumer education)

X..... The Worker and Eta Family A.

"What in a Family"

B.

"Togetherness"

I

XI.

working together

2.:

playing together

3.

solving problems

The Worker and Leisure Time A.

XII.

1.

"Time. Off" (amount of time and things to do 1.

hobbies

2.

recreational activities

3.

community services

4.

vacations

The Worker and His Community A.

B.

C.

"Your Voice" (oivic responsibilities) 1.

voting

2.

obeying .laws

"I Need Help" (useful city agencies) 1.

fire

2.

police, etc.

3.

community

"Be Aware" (keeping informed) 1.

XIII.

media

The Worker and Current Concerns A.

"Shooting, Swallowing, Snorting, Sniffing" (drugs)

B.

"Act Now" .(ecology)

XIV. .Homework A.

"Your Heritage" (American history)

B.

"What's Happening Now" (current events)

C.

"Curl Up and Read" (reading for fun)

'D.

"Be A Detective" (research in interest areas)

E.

"Around The World" (Geography)

49

I

1

Exhibit 8

Results for Tenching/Learning Tryout

.

OBSERVER REACTION SHEET Career Education Project Teaching/Learning Package "Pleasant, Positive, and Punctual"

As a part of the Maryland Career Education Project, the Project staff has developed a series of Teaching/Learning Packages covering a segment of the curriculum called the "World of Work." These packages were developed and used at General Henry. Lee Junior High School. They were intended to provide career-relevant information and activities for the students participating in the junior high school component of this project which was focused on work-study activities for "high-risk" students in this school. Now-the project staff is interested in the possible transferability of these packages to other schools and other levels of students as a part of a more general approach to career awareness. In order to explore the issue of transferability of these packages, the .Project Staff has scheduled a trial demonstration of a single one of the packages, "Pleasant, Positive, and Punctual," at Rock Glen Junior High School on 10, 11 and 14 May 1973. This trial' effort is scheduled to be used with -four classes: a low ability 7th grade; an enriched"8th grade; a 9th grade work -study class; and a regular 9th grade. Observers have been invited to observe and critique the three sessions scheduled for each of'these four clasSes, particularly with respect to the suitability.ofthe patkage for the students involved, The attached form is provided so that observers may'summarize their observations and comments for the benefit of-the Project Staff.

.

As an aid to Observation, it should be-inoted that four:objectives have been .establishedfor this particular package:.

Given a list of jobs, the-student should be able to select the proper 1. kind of clothing a person should wear to do his job. The student should be able to identify three kinds of cleanliness by 2. .which employers judge employees. 3.

The student shoUld be able to write a meaning for the expressions: a.

b. c.

Job knowledge EffOrt Job attitudes

Given a list of situations, the student should be able to selettthose, 4. that show: a.

b. c.

Good job attitudes Good 'personal relations Good safety habits.

OBSERVERS:

With the above background, please'use the attached sheet to record your -comments and observations with respect to. the class or classesyouobserved. Please return your comments'to. the principal, Mr. Donald Knox.

Exhibit 8 '(Continued)

-2-

1.

Waft the lesson appropriate (in content for one or more of the stated ohjectives?-

Yen g

2.

;

(Please explain)

No

Was the lesson appropriate in level for the students in the class? (Please explain)

Yesio

3.

Did the lesson.achieve active participation on the.part of the students? No

Ycs

4.. Tow would you rate the student interest level for this lesson?

;,Fairly 'good 9,

Generally high 5.

Now would yoU rate student understanding of the material presented?

Generally high_A_. 6.

Generally. poor

Fairly good

9;

Generally poor

Could this lesson be successfully taught by other teachers to other students in other schools? Yes

3

;

0r%

No

id. a

C%

C41

',If not, whal, would have to -be done to achieve a successful transfer to other.. situations?

7.

With what student groups should such packages be used? Al]. junior high students ,457'..4 work -study groups,..i)nly Q groups only. .other (Please specify): 3 orle

;'

_Low- ability

;

8.

Would you recommend the production and dissemination of this approach for use in other schools? Yes.

5

,:

No 41

(Please explain)

Please offer any further Comments you may have as n rcnult of your, observations:.

......

0

51.

It shoulcrbepointed out that the total number of respondents to this reaction sheet was'only:9 and that the tryout was comprised of 4 classes taking one out of 4 units.: There is no way that this can be considered an adequate tryout of the methodology which went into the developMent of 1..he

model, or of the model, or of the teaching/learning packages as a set. Nonetheless it is only fair to say that the reactions of the teachers and'observers Were 'generally positive toward the teaching/learning,

units and their potentialities.

In the EIS opinion, it would be dangerous.to proceed to generalize this "model" to the entire Baltimore School System on a full implementation. basis at this time.

Much more in the way of tryout and evaluation of the

teaching/learning units needs to be done under more controlled condition's.

This would perMtt'the evaluation to provide to the unit's developers, and to the teachers

positive suggestions regarding the implementation and improve-

ment of Such-units.

If further use is made of the teaching/learning units,, "!:.

in the McCormick.plan ,idea without further controlled testing, it should only, be done on a step-Vy step basis which would allow operational-eXperience to

build, up and to be_incorporated into the materials and their applicatim'' Goal II - Student impact of work oriented programs. A.

Method - Students in Schools-72 and 80 will be exposed

to a work-oriented program through their respective schools. B.

Students:will'exhibit improved

Expected results

attendance and school. achievement. Data collected,

of the programs at the two schools have been 'ineltided in Appendix A.

Grade and attendance data are given below, along with

a summary of employer ratings. Table 9 .

,

lists the participation of the.students in School-72,

along with attendance data and grade data for each student., It will be noted that 11 were 9th graders (all but 1 male); 3 were 8th graders (all but 1 male); and 7 were 7th graders (all male),

As the program began the year with 28

students, 7 have dropped out., of the program for various reasons.

There has

not been much success in including girls in this program at'this'Echool: it should be noted that each of the students on the list in Table 9 as a stock person.

Also,.

worked

There was a yariety. of offices and, employers represented

.

Table 9

'Cooperative Work Experience Program School 72.

ScX

Grade Level

R.B.

M

W.B.

Student

Absences*

Grades* +. '72 '73

Job

'72

'73

9

62

42

S

S

Hardware Stock Boy

M

9

6

19

S

S

Restaurant Stock Boy

D.B.

M

9

5

35

S

S

Restaurant Stock Boy

W. G..

M

9

7

1

S

U

Grocery Stock Boy

S.H.

M

9,

6

9

S

S

Shoe Sales Stock Boy

M.M.

M

9

20

20

S

U

Shoe Sales Stock. Boy

E.M.

M

9

50

42

S

U

Dry Goods Stock Boy

C.N.

9

41

U

S

Dry Goods Stock Boy

R.R.

M M

9

45

21

S

S.

Grocery Stock Boy

C.S.

M

9

6

13

S

S

Loan Office Stock Boy

9

100

12

U

S

Dry Goods Stock Girl

22

S

S

Grocery Stock Boy

U

Grocery Stock Boy

L.S.

5.

C.F.

M

8

D.J.

M

8

15

2

S

M.W.

'F

8

22

49

S

S.C.

M

7

-

-

S

Produce Stock Boy

J.H.

M

7

-

-

U

Hardware Stock Boy

J.M.

M.

7

-

-

-

Furniture Stock Boy

C.A.

M

7

45

30

S

S

Grocery Stock Boy

W.J.

M

7

18

46

S

U

Shoe Store Stock Boy

D.M.

M

7

48

34

S

'S

Furniture Stock Boy

C.M.

M

7

50

62

S

S

Grocery Stock Girl

Based on first three quarters of each year.

Grocery Stock Boy Blanks pre-Missing data.

Numerical grades were converted to letters.(S = 60 and up) to.make them comparable to letter grades.

53

on the lint, but the variety and distinction of the job activities engaged in by the students is very poor.

Participants in this program in School 80 are shown in Table 10 where all of the participants were 9th grade students and there were 21 boys and 18 girls out of an initial group of 42 participants.

There was a

much wider variety of job activities at this school, though the jobs were of course all low, entry level jobs in nature.

There was much greater

participation by girls.

The major objectives of this Goal of the work study programs was to impact students in the form of improved attendance and improved achievement.

E's have been able to collect some relevant data, as shown in the Tables,

(Attendance and grade data for the.years 1971-1972 and 72-73 are based on only the first three quarters of each year, since the fourth quarter of 1972-73 was not yet available at the close of data collection.) Some summary statistics were done on the attendance data for the two schools.

These statistics were clone to compare absentee rates 'for 1972-

73 with the like period for 71-72.

For these calculations, only those students

for whom both,sets cif data were available were used.

The analysis showed that

with respect toSchool 72 there was a mean decrease in absence of approximately 6 days per student,

However, there was an extremely large standard deviation

around this mean (about 30 days) for the 17 students with complete data in the calculation.

Thus, the application of student's "t" to these data

indicated that the mean decrement in the absence figures was not significant at the 57. 'level.

The application of the Sign Test also showed no significant

improvement in attendance (9 of the 17 students improved in attendance while 6 showed no impro'vement). In essence, these figures indicate that at School

72 the impact of the program on attendance for 1972-73 as compared to 1971-72 was not significant.

Of course it must be remembered that the program may

indeed have had significant impact on 'selected individual students.

At School 80, using the32 students with complete data, the mean decrement in absence was 6.9 days per student (with a substantially smaller standard deviation of approximately 17 days).

The analysis of Student's "t"

here showed a significant decrease in absence at almost the .01 level of signifidance.

This decrease was supported by the Sign Test at approximately

54.

Table 10

Cooperative Work Experience Program School 80

Sex

Grade Level

S.C.

M

A.E.

Student

Grades*+

Absences*

Job

.'72

'73

'72

'73

9

50

28

P

F

Gas Station (Maintenance)

M

9

7

.9

G

F

Pharmacy (Maintenance)

P.H.

M

9

57

37,

D

G

School Supply

J.H.

M

9

17

4

P

F

Lunch Counterman

D.J.

M

9

49

27

P

D

Library Page

1

M.M.

M

'9

22

38

. F

.P

Gas Station

M.N.

M

9

6

6

G

G

Gas Station

R.O.

M

'9

19

10

P

F

Tire Co. (Maintenance)

A.S.

M

9

46

43

P

D

Fruit Stall. Helper

D.T.

M

9

45

.3

F

G

Gas Station.

H.S.

M

9

2

5

P

G

Gas Station

J.T.

M

9

20

16

P

F

Gift Shop Sales

T.W.

M

9

5

4

G

G'

Gas Station

B.W.

M

9

8

2

.F

G

Lunch Counterman

T.J.

M

9

-

-

-

Pharmacy

T.L.

M

9

10

3

F

G

None

W.J.

M

9

-

19

-

P

None

Z.C.

M'

9

-

16

F

None

M.A.

M

9

32

F

Gas Station

R.S.

F

9

5

F

Gas Station

D.B.

F

9

16

9

F

G

Sales

M.B.

F.

9

3

6

F

G

Laundry Aide

M:B.

F

9

39

43

F

P

Sales,.Sample Shop

B.C.

F

9

29

37.

F

F

Department Store Sales

M.M.

F

9

50

.30.

F

P

Y.E.

'

9

5

3

G

G

C.S.

F

9

31

13'

F

G

C.H.

F

9

34

26.

P

F

Shoe Store Sales,

J.H.

F

9

16

18

.P

G

Laundry Mae'"

'D.J.

P

P

F

Laundry Aide

8

.

9

-

.

.

Shoe Store Sales . Shoe Store Sales

..

Laundry Aide

4",,

Table 10(Continued),

Grade Student

Absences*

Grades*+ Job

'72

'73

11

P

G

Shoe Store Sales

14

5

G

G

Sales

9

22

33

F

F

Nursing Homejtide

F,

9

28

18

P

G

Food Store Sales

K.S.

F.

9,

8

0

F

F

Shoe Store Sales

B.T.

F

9

68

16

P

G

Shoe Store Sales

P.G.

F

9

7

52

'D

D

Nursing Home,Aide

R. S.

M

9

91

D

D

K.W.

M

9

10

-P

F

Sex

Level

N.L.

F

B.M.

'72

'73

9

34

F

9

M.S.

F

T.S.

Blanks are missing data.

-

,,,y,.

Labeling Specimens

Based upon first three quarters of each year.

* + Numerical grades concerted to letters fot cOmparability @ 90-100-E; 80-89-G; 70-79-F; 60-69-P; and 59 and below -D.

tt

5% level.

Thus, at School 80 it would appear that there was a significant

impact of the program on attendance on the classes taken overall (and ngnin,.

the program mny have hnd signkficnnt impa. on selected individuals). The tables also provide the data for the analysis of grades for the two schools.

The E's would like to point out that the grade data for 1971-72

and 1972-73 lacks comparability to a considerable degree. comparisons is possible under these, circumstances.

Only the crudest of.

Not the least of the

difficulties encountered is the switch from numerical grades to letter grades

which took place-over the past year.

In view of these difficulties, comparisons

were made between the two years simply on the basis of improvement versus no improvement.

Improvement Was defined as a change in level of grade by one

or more letters, or With respect, to the S/U situation, a change in status

from S to U or vice-versa. program had no

Examined in this'fashion, it'can be seen that the

measurable impact with respect to school 72, the bulk of the

students showing no change in.grade level from year to year.

With respeCt to

school 80 the results were somewhat more encouraging, but not significantly so; 17 students showed improvement in grade level by at least 1 letter value, 'while 14 showed no improvement.

The only conclusion whiCh is possible on the

basis of these crude grade data, is that the program made no overall impact on student achievement from 1971-72 to 1972-73.

.Again of course significant

impact may, have occurred with respect to.individual students.

One final analysis was performed on the grades and attendance'ddta. A four-fold table was constructed to classify students from both schools, together into "improved" versus "not improved" on these two characteristics.

The Phi-coefficient which resulted from this calculation was .32, indicating a slight tendency for grade improvement to be associated with attendance improvement'for these students.

This coefficient was significant at

approximately the 5% level. Employer Rating Cards The program was highly successful in gaining the cooperation of local businessmen as employers for the students.

There were 12 employers

working with School 72 and 10 with School 80 who provided jobs for the students.

57

Each of the students in the junior high school Cooperative Work

.

Experience Program was rated by his employer according to a list of skills and work habits and personal traits as shown in the card format in Appendix D.

In addition, the employer was asked to give the student a general rating

in the area of skills and work habits, personal traits, punctuality, and 'attendance.

The E's have summarized the general ratings by-schocil for the last

year using the code of 4, 3, 2,,1 to respectively represent the category designations on the, card of "superior", "good", "fair", and "poor".

results of these summaries'are shown in Table 11.

The

Here it may be seen that

School 80 was superior to.School 72 with respect to each of the 4 categories and that average ratings for,the 4 categories ranged only from 2.71 to 2.76. (These average ratings are not particularly high, all being les's than good,

and running from half-way between fair and good to nearly good.) Again E's regret that no comparative data is available to indicate whether or not attitudes as seen by employers has changed over the period of the last year.

It is clear that this is.a critical area for the success of'the

individual in the world of work, and it is equally clear that many of the students in this program have not yet reached a level of development with. respect to these kinds of characteristics which would make them really acceptable employees to the average employer.

It is of course exactly here

where the program has an opportunity to make a great contribution by providing

.

the student with on-the-job experience in a non-hostile, -supportive atmosphere.

However, it is not possible to say from these data how well the program has:

functioned in this respectIt would appear that the project has been only m?derately successful

in achieving the goal of reducing absenteeism and not succssful in improving the achievement level of the students-participating in the junior high school Cooperative Work Experience Program.

It is quite likely that significant gains

in these respects have occurred for individual students, but the effects are not strong enough to produce strong improvements in the groups as a whole.

The

absenteeism figures show a continuation of the decline noted in previous evaluations however, which is presumptive (though not significant) evidence of a continued positive effect of the program on absenteeism.

The crudeness of the

grade evaluation (engendered by changes in the grading system) leaves it a moot question as to whether or not favorable impadt on achievement, as rep9rten by previous evaluation, eontinued during 1972 -73. 58

Table 11

AverageEmployer Ratings* of Student Employees

Skills and Work Habits

Personal Traits

School 72

2.59

2.63

School 80

2.93

2.76

Aft6Wdance

Average

2.54

2.50

2.56

2.78

2.98

'2.91

2.90

2.71,

2.76

2.71

2.73

I

Average

*

Punctuality

According to the following scale: Superior -

Unmeighted. ,

Good -3;

Fair - 2;

and Poor

+

Gold ITT - Provision of Teaching and Learning Packages to Schools 72 and 80 Method .- Project staff will create or select teaching/learning

A.

.packnes relating subject content arena.to'one or more career clusters for ..... ,

specified teachers in Schools 72 and 80.

Expected results - Needs more specification.

B.

At present only

that it will be done. Data Collected

.

The amorphous nature of this goal has resulted in a considerable i

difficulty in specifying the data to be collected.

E's expected to identify a

list of teachers, subject matter areas, career clusters, criteria lor-pelection .

of materials, objectives, and plans.for developments of the packages. none of these things has actually been identifable.

Basically

What has been identified 0

a listing of the 43 packages included in the. McCormick Plan(see Exhibit .7

).t

It would appear that the development of these materials has been almost entirety the work of one individual, who. has developed them as she has gone along in working with students at. School 72, and who has developed them in response to

her on perceptiph ofthe needs of the students with respect to subject matter' and materials. The packages have not been u(sed.by any other teachers than the, developer.

Presumably, they are potentially available to other teachers who may will to use ........._

.,

them, and there is.a certain degree of advocacy for distribuag them tolother teachers in the system (see discussion on the Career ExplOration Model).

It is clear that the effort behind these 43 teachingilearningackages represents'a great deal of Investment of time and effort, undertaken lAW

'Con. ..a

(

siderable degree of sensitivity for the needs. of this particular-roup ofi students.

HOwever, most of the objectives listed at. the beginning of th(

evaluation project have not 'been met in the sense that theprocess objectives

OfdistribUtion and tryout byppecified teachers and the development an statement of explicit ::;criteria for the selection of materials, content,, and career clusters

have not occurred.

Thus, in summary, the 43 teaching/learning packages represent

an impressive achievement, the net effect:of which is indeterminate, at the presenttime.-

- Counselor In-Service Training A.

Method - Provide a one day in-service prograM for .60 Baltimore !

City Junior High School ..counselors.on the contributOna necessary tb'" effective career guidance programs.

B.

Expected results - 60 specified Junior High counselors will

have taken part in the' one -day program and made a mintMuM of 10 recom-

mendntions each considering their-perceptions of career guidance nn a component of a system-Wide career education-progrnm.

Recommendations

-will be'incorporated in the Career Exploration Model. Data Collected Again,' this evaluation was more of a process evalOation than any-

thing else, with emphasis on determining that the project staff had indeed carried out its plan to conduct the in-service program.

A workshop primarily

for counselors was held on 31 October 1972, before the E's had officially. begun their evaluation effort.

The agenda is shown in Exhibit

9

.

Contrary

to plan, the project staff did not derive 10 recommendations from each individual,.but rather collected a series of composite recommendationS from various diseugSion groups.

_

.

These-coMposite recommendations and comments were

indeed included in the Career Exploration Model as it was presented-to the E's. Reaction6 of the participating counselors to the workshop

and'also

some reactions collected from nonparticipating counselors, are summarized in Exhibit

10.

Here it may be seen that bOth types.of counselors agreed on the

extreme significance of career education, as well as guidance and counseling. The final. part of this Exhibit also., shows some of the statements of the .

counselors with respect to functions that counselors may performlin a career

-

education program.

There is an expected degree of parallelism between the

statements of attending' counselors and non-attending counselois, though the

attending counselors have madeSome statements which are obviously specific:to.-_, the information supplied, to them as part of the workshop.

In addition to the responses shown in the above Exhibit, attending

counselors were also asked,tdrespond to certain aspectsbf the workshop on an assessment sheet.

.There were approximately 90 counselors on the attendante

list,. and the frequencies displayed in Exhibit -11 show that a number. bf them

did not attend some of the sessions, andforAidnot fill out the assessment sheet.

However Exhibit 11 shows the reactions of those who responded to the

assessment sheet with respect to the various portions of the program.

The

well knbwn generosity effect is evidentin,most of the ratings shown in this There was little question that.the group accepted the importance

Exhibit 9

Maryland Career Education .

'Development Project Workshop

R 0 G RA M Tuesday, October 31, 1972 Lake Clifton Senior High School 2801 St. Lo Drive Theme:

Career Education - A Concept Unifying School, Home and Community

Objectives:

To develop an understanding of the philosophy, goals and objectives of Career Education To identify the responsibilities of Junior High School Counselors, in implementing a program of Career Education

815 - 8:30

Registration'

8:30 - 8:45

Opening - Mr. Clarence Gittings, Assistant Superintendent, Special Projects -- Statement of Purpose

.

8:45 - 9:00

Greetings - Dr. Joel Carrington, Assistant Superintendent Secondar; Education

9:00 - 9:20

Review of Procedures - Ydncy,L. Whittaker, Staff, Maryland Career Development Project

'PrL8T4 9:20

9:25

Introduction of Keynote Speaker - Mrs. Nancy Pinson, Assistant Director, Maryland Career Development Project

9:2.5 - 10:00

Keynote speaker - Dr. Kenneth Hoyt - Professor of Education, University of Maryland Topic: Career Education - Its Philosophy, Goals and Objectives

10:00 - 10:15

Break

10:15 - 10:45

Panel Discussion:

Moderator: Panelists:

"Career Education in tekJunior High --School - The team as a Dr. Benjamin Whitten, Area Superintendent, Vocational Education Mrs Sallie Russell, Counselor, Calverton Junior High School Mr. Frederick Eyster,'Supervisor, Guidance Dr. Elaine Davis, Educational.Assistant to the .Superintendent Dr. Robert C. Lloyd, Assistant Superintendent, Pupil Personnel Services Mr. Morton Esterson, Assistfint Superintendent,', SpeCial Education Mrs Elizabeth Adams, Princpoli_Rock Glen

Junior High School

Exhibit 9 (Continued)

10:11

110:!)

Discussion (0nest.1,ons and Answers

- 11:30

Lunch -- Room 0'200

32:115

12:115 - 12:50

Presenting Dr. genncth Hoyt - Mr. Niel Carey, Director, MorylJnO Career Development Project

12:50 - 1:15

Dr. Kenneth Hoyt - Topic: Jnnior High School. Counselors' Responsibilities in Cureer Education

Discu3aion - Demonstrated Junior High School Counselor tiy.hAing Career related programs Moderator - Mr. Niel Carey, Director, Maryland Career Development Project Interest Test - Mr. pion Lerner, Counselor Participants 'General Henry Lee Junior High School Project GO - Mrs. Chariate 14:_bbne, Coordinutor Project VIEW - 'lair. George Kammerer, Coordinator Inter-:Disciplinary Planning in the Junior High School - Mrs. Joan Tillery Counselor, William H. Lemmel Junior High School. Mr; Maurice Schreiber, Principal General Henry Lee Junior High School

1:15 - 2 :.15

GrouP Sessions - List significant contributions that counselors can make in implementing a program of. Career Education

2:15 - 3:00

3:00 - 3:30

.

Group Reassemble Group Reports Post Test Adjournment

NOTE:

Group leaders adjournment

Department Heads will meet immediately after

C'

II.

I.

-II.

2

of some importance

,

of little importance

1

Exhibit 10

6

of greatest importance

6

oft greatest importance

of little importance

0

1

0 of little importance

0

of little importance

of some importance

2

of some importance

of some importance

7

of greatest importance 1

NOT ATTENDING. COUNSELORS

5

Responses

.

Responses

important part of the career education program

To what'degree is guidance and counseli_ o. as

Counselors Not Attending

List three specific activities or functions that counselors may perform in a Career Education Program

and

of greatest importance

Question No.

III.

To what degree is career education a important part of the-educational program

ATTENDING COUNSELORS

I.

Questions

Counselors Attending

From

An Evaluation

Career Education Woi-kshop For Junior High Schobl Counselors

0

Ln

:

Assisting with career related Programs

Acting as resource people to teachers and classes

Conduct career seminars, interest surveys, college tours,,and industry visits

Supervise use of VIEW system

Develop and maintain a Resource Center

Assist with the coordination of a school wide career education program

Assist with the coordination of such programs as Project Go and VIEW

2.

3.

1.

2.

1.

2.

1.

3.

Conduct group counseling sessions

2.rovide Resource Materials

Disseminating information

l.

Conduct group counseling sessions, group guidaroe sessions, and role playing

Interest testing with follow-up of related career projects

1.

1.

Serve a catolyst in developing career education project school - wide 3.

2., Serve as resource to teachers working on career education projects

Groups guidance sessions on career goals

Give guidance on getting and keeping job

3. 1.

Assistpupils in finding jobs

Provide information on careers

The counselor can encourage, where possible, the exploration of interests through subject areas (required and elective)

The counselor can ascertain student interests, and make them aware of careers to which their interests could lead.

'etc) and persons.

through resource material (films, slides, pits

.The counselor should expose students to the world

NOT ATTENDING COUNSELORS

2.

1.

3.

2..

1.

Exhibit 10 ;(Continued)

r

Proving materials relating to careers or colleges

3.

.

Counseling for the imprOvement of self concept and 'raising aspirations and understanding of self concept.

Supply students with infOrmation and interpretations regarding themselve.

Question No. III

2.

.

1.

.,ATTENDING COUNSELORS.

Exhibit 10

Continued)

Solicit the aid of teachers and administrators in working with career exploration

3.

Present assembly program on the world of work.

-3.

Keep abreast of career opportunities

Classroom visitations, conduct group guidance and counseling sessions.

2.

2.

Individual counseling on careers

1.

Assist in exposing students to:Career opportunities

3.

Conduct group counseling sessions,

3.

1..

2.

1.

Conduct tours to business and industry, college etc.

materialand people

Plan assembly programs and assisting with resource

Question No. III

2.

1.

ATTENDING COUNSELORS

Assist students in bridging the gap between school and'industry (Work)

Assist with curriculum changes or modification

Assist classroom teachers to incorporate career education in classroom activities (curriculum)

NOT ATTENDING COUNSELORS

CAREER EDUCATION WORKSHOP Exhibit 11

October 31, 1972

ASSESSMENT

SHEET.

(Compilation

Part I

Code for Point Scores .

Directions: Please check those ratings .that describe your assessment of the workshop'in terms of its value

_5.

Extremely valuable

. 4. ,Valuable

r;.1,

,Moderately valuable 2. Of little value 1. Not appropriate

No Response

N/A A.M, Session

P.M, Session

N/R

2

c

,

Dr. Hoyt's Presentation Discussion of Programs

Keynote Speaker 26

22

11

Panel Discussion IM Question/Answer

19

20

26

4

III"

r

1

29

21

8

18

17

18

4

0

2

Group Sessions

13

10

24

_

lich of these categories best describe your perception of the importance of Career Education in the total educationr al program? (Please check.),

(I-

Part II

As a counselor, how would ..you describe

your role in Career Education's implesmntation in your (Check.) school?

Develop nd conduct self awareness programs

Consultant in staff and curriculmm development for Career Education

--

Coordinate home and community resources for Career Edur cation

Other (Describe)

All of these

. 40.11mmr

8

See compilation attached Sheet Numberl.

14

34' WL-110

OR = 5 General Reaction to Workshop:

(Use 'Code. Point Scores from Part I.)

Commentev See Compilation Attached Sheet #2.

5

4

3

2

1

of career education, close to half of those responding ranking career education at the most extremely valuable end of the ocnle.

The modal response on general

reactions to the workshop was that it was valuable.

However it should be noted

that a healthy portion of the group in some cases responded that the presentations were of moderate value as opposed to valuable or extremely valuable..

In

summary this assessment suggests that there is a high appreciation of the value of career education, that the workshop was well received in general, and that speaker presentations, panel discussions, and questfon and answer sessions were seen as more valuable than discussion or group sessions.

A second workshop was held in connection with the Secondary, Vocational and Adult Divisional. Conference on 20 March 1973 at the Baltimore Hebrew Congregation in Park Heights.

The agenda for this meeting is shown in Exhibit 12, and

the roster of participants included over 30_administrative personnel. Technically this workshop was not a part of the program to be evaluated by the E's, since the Goal was focused on.counselors not administrators.

However,

a brief assessment sheet was collected by the project staff in connection with the workshop, and the results are shown in Exhibit

13.

The important finding

in connection with this workshop was the strength of opinion.associated with the statement that the Baltimore City Public Schools should invest more effort in career education.

The results show 'that the administrators attending this

workshop are strongly behind and committed to increased effort in career educe,

tion.

Favorable but not so extremely favorable results were obtained in response

to the statement that the workshop provided a great deal of the participants .

which was applicable to their own situations, and the statement that something new about career education was learned as a result of the workshop..

Thus, it appears that the objectives of Goal IV were met. Summary

In general, it would appear that the junior high component has achieved certain'of its goals.

A Career Exploration Model of a.sort has been

created, and over 40 teaching/learning packages have 'been created in connection

with the McCormick plan.

The indicated workshops, have indeed been held, and

have been favorably; received by their participants.

A functional work-oriented

program has been established at two pilot schools. Of these'various aceomplishments, it would appear that the workshops were the most successful.

This is possibly true because the project staff is

Exhibit 12 SVA DIVISIONAL CONFERENCE ON CAREER EDUCATION DALTIMORE CITY PUBLIC SCHOOLS AND MARYLAND STATE CAREER DEVELOPMENT PROJECT (K-ADULT)

BALTIMORE maw CONGREGATION PARK HEIGHT S AND SLADE AVENUES MARCH 20, 1973

A.GENDA 8:30- 9:00 a.m.

Registration and Coffee

9:00- 9:10 a.m.

Introduction of Guest Speaker:

9:10j 9:30 a.m,

Keynote Address:

9:30-10:15 a.m.

SymposiuM:

Dr. Joel A. Carrington Acting Asst. Supt. Secondary Education

Dr. Vernon S. Vavrina Associate Superintendent Curriculum and Instruction.

Moderator. Mrs. Carolyn W. Boston Participants:

Dr. Theodore Rybka TEr. Leonard Rosenberg Mr. Reginald Lawrence Mrs. Audrey Allen" Mrs. Mildred Kington Mr. Malcolm Dutterer Mr; E. Niel Carey Mrs. Charlotte Mebane Mr: Curtis Dove

Miss Portia Pinkne Mr. George Mitchell.

10:15-10:45 a.m.

Question and Answer Period

10:45-11:00 a.m.

Break

11:00-12:00 Noon

Task Force Model For Career Education Workshops

12:00- 1:00 p:m.

Lunch

1:00- 1:30 p.m,

Film:

, ..

1:30- 1:45 p.m.

"Vocational Education-Matimore Style" Intrdduced by: Dr. Benjamin Whitten. Area Superintendent Vocational Education

Career Education As A State Priority:

Mr. Niel Carey Director, Maryland State Career Development Project (*.Adult)

Exhibit 12 (Continued)

1:50- 3:00 p.m.

Exioting Programo with Implications for Career Education: :Maryland Career Development Project (K-Adult) Project Go Cooperative Education and Placement Programs Direct Search for Talent (DST) ( Recruitment Task Force (RTF) Interdisciplinary Approach to Career Education Mrs. Elizabeth Edmonds, Asst. Principal School #79 Mt, Oscar Helm., Principal, School #70 Mr: Maurice Schreiber, Prin., School 172 Mrs. An& O. Emery, Prin., School .

3:2

3:20 p.m.

Overview of Maryland State Career Development Project (K-Adult): Mks. Charlotte Mebane

3:30 p.m.

Summary and Implications for The Future: Dr,_Joel A. Carrington_ Acting Assistant Superintendent Secondary Education

3:30 t .m.

Evaluation

3:40 o.m.

Adjournment

.Exhibit 13

SVA Divisional Conferenee'on Career Education Baltimore City Public Schools And Maryland Career Development Project (K Adult)

..Career Education 'Workshop.

March 20, 1973'

.

ASSESSMENT SHEET (Compilation) I.

feel that I received a great deal out of the workshop. apply, information gained to my own situation. I

Strongly Agree 17 II.

37

NO Opinion

Disagree

Strongly Disagree

5

10

2

The Baltimore City Public. Schools should invest more effort in Career Education. Strongly Agree 41

III.

Agree

I expect to,

,

Agree 27

No Opinion 1.

Disagree

Strongly Disagree 0

2

I think that Career Education is theoretically important, but it doesn't apply to me. Strongly Agree 2

Agree 3

No Opinion _2

Disagree

Strongly Disagree

31

33

feC1 that. I learned something new about Career Education.

\

Stron6ly Agree.. 17

Agree

40

No Opinion 2

7.1

Disagree

9

Strongly Disagree. 3

'familiar with ,the process of Preparing and holding workshops. The other developments, having been somewhat more innovative, have had somewhat less clear nalutory impacts.

The Career Exploration Model and/or the teaching/

learning paCkages are not yet to a point' where full implementation in

Wrantekon the basis of empirical and objective field results.

This is

not to say that the teaching /learning packages and /or the career exploration

model are necessarily inadequate or inconsistent, but simply that.the project staff has not yet been able to bring them to the test.

For example, the

tryout of the sample lesson of the teaching/learning packages was quite favorably received by those who observed it, but represents only a single unit from more than 40, tested in a single school over single three-day period.

In the opinion of the E's,,the career exploration model needs

additional work in the form of theoretical structure, coordination, and coherence to tie it together into something more than a collection of more or less miscellaneous pieces. With respect to the work - oriented program carried out in two

schools during this last year, the results seemed somewhat disappointing. There was no discernable effect at either school on academic grades perhaps due to the crudity of the grade measure.

At the better of the two schools,

there was a barely significant reduction in absenteeism. _With a nonsignificant reduction in absenteeism in the other school (though the favorable trend,noted by previous evaluators appeared to continue).

Finally, itStibuld be noted that a number of persons dropped out of the" work-oriented programs over the period of the year, and that those that remained in the program did not receive particularly high ratings from their employers with a respect to their general, job - related skills, such as work

habits, personal characteristics, punctuality and attendance on the job:

The E's also observed that students appeared to be interested and informed with respect at least to the materials contained in the various teaching/ leernlng packages taught to them in one of the schools.

It is impossible

to state the extent to which this,was a function of teacher personality and teacher approach, and to what extent it was a function of the materials which are being used.

72

IL

In summation.l. the impact of the program lads less demonstrable in

terms of student attendance and achievement than in terms, Of favorable impressions created.

However some positiVe effects were 'evident, with the likelihood that

the availability of more precise'measures might have strengthened the results. Senior,High Component

Coal I - Establishment of Prototype Career Information Center

Method. Project staff will establish a prototype occupational

A.

information center at Southern High School, Baltimore, comprised of the

VIEW system, its relatedequipment, and information regarding educational and local occupational opportunities. Expected results

B.

The center will be used by students of

Southern High, and teachers and counselors of Southern and other secondary schools.

Other secondary schools may establish similar centers.

Data Collected E's were instructed to limit their concern to Southern High School.

The program description for the Center at Southern High School is to be found in Appendix A.

In addition to developing a program description,. E's planned

to develop a procedure for monitoring the usage.of the Center by means.af d usage card.

A supply of these cards was

Exhibit 14 shOwS the VIEW use card.

provided for the Southern High School Center in early December.

It was requested

that they be placed in .a permanent place along with the request that they be filled out by those students using the. VIEW machine.

and by:eounSelOrs Were also requested.

Table 12

Announcements in classes

shows the results of the VIEW

use card froth its inception in early December rD 22 February when ,filled-out

cardsiwere collected for a preliminary report.

The collection of VIEW use

cards was discontinued after this time (unbeknown to the E's) so thatIno use ---

data is available after approximately the end of February. The table shows a scattered use of the VIEW system over the-period' in question by 131 students.

These students examined an average of 3-4 VIEW

cards and.printed out an average 'of, 2 -3 of them.

2to the System was favorable.

10ft'entral, their response

It may be noted that a substantial number of the

students responding through the-nab of this card agreed that the career informotion center (i.e. the VIEW machine) "meets my needs for information abonf:

'Exhibit 144

1-""Frrl NAME

:

(n.:.T1n:Y.4L)

-1..

-

t

:

11:.:: CAROS DID YOU EXAMINE? fly 11:

,. 1. cy- , s'.0:1

L

SEX..

DATE 11'1!. ...Z.,. pr..V.V."VVI:rts.- -.134-1C 41,4 tothi

VXEW CARDS DID NOD GET A

C0010.IN OrFORTUNITIES

D:q."TOnT7

T

IL

THAT YOU WANT TO 71ND OUT YOU AnOUT?

.-....... TEAT SUN'S M.; VOI Mt.

kAte,

!N: CAREU INFOr,;;ATION CENTER ME CARrZi INVORNATION CENTER. 1;1::::IF; MY Ni:Y.LIS INFO1MA.UTS IiY NCE%S PTORMATION $1..MT EDDCATIONAL Tf0:-; AUNT 07C122.Y.CIONAL ;.Y.TZ GM.!R.WOTIr.S vzity fttl:Ctl ACk.d ;In T

CAC EEC

S7 -c

CtA A CAW

DliACkr.0

.1.-!1.:cr

9... ..

)",I!. . N

ACM

r

I

74

r 01 SACIUti SI PVCLY

lattAare

Table 12 - Summary of Information Cnthered On VIEW Use Cards - Southern high-School

o

Total number of students using VIEW machine

= 131

Total number of males usin3 VIEW machine

=

t10 students did not

72

49

Total number of females using VIEW machine

respond to these items.

411111~.

Schedule of Use: 12/ ?. - 1 12/11 7. 1 1/2 - 2 12/12 - 3 1/3 - 1 12/13 - 10 12/14 - 0 1/5 - 8 12/15 - 6 1/8 12/18 - 0 1/9 - 3 1/10 - 4 .12/19 - 6. 1/11 - 0 12/20 - 7 1/12 - 4 12/21 - 9

Total

Number of

Total

Nuher

1/15 - 0 1/16 - 1

1/26 - 1 1/29 - 0 1/30 - 0

1/17 ;. 2

,

4/31 - 0

1/18 - 0 .1/19 - 4

1/? 2/1 2/2 2/5 2/6

1/22 -,'1 /

1/23 - 1 1/24 -.I).

t125 - 4 cn:amincd

'

- 1 - 0 - 1

- 0 - 8

2/7 -2/8 2/9 .2/12 2/13 2/14 7 2/15

1 4 3 3

2/19 - 3/10- 0 2/? 3/8

- 1 1

No date - 25,

0

-.2/16 - 1

437

of card:, fro 1 which printout_ were

-=

329

Total number of view cards containing opportunitie3 students wont to find :a 306 cut more about Total number answering the following questions with each option: 1. The Career Information Center b,ects sin needs for information about occupational oppoxtunities very well. aStronE;ly

Agree).

iree $6-

Disagree

Don't Know,.

,

.

23

3

Strongly Disagree 2

, ..

2. The Caref,r Information Center meets'my.nreds for information about educational.` 6pportiluivies very well.

Strongly Aeree ........../._____:___ 32

A-ree ._

64

Don't Know 38

75

Disnree' 6

Strongly Disavyee 2

educational

ipportnnities very well." i:1-mr-iv1

yet been prepared,

Al.]. of the VIEW cards in the filen at the ilume d ucatio nall--no,,edtacat.ion a

however, these responses reflect On the fact: that many

oceupationalcards contain information about the 'educational requirements of the occupation.

Thus this apparent discrepancy does not appear to impugn the

validity (2( the occupational responses;

A, survey conducted for the E's by the VIEW Coordinator is shown' in Exhibit -ThiS ;.Bows that: most of the junior high schools in the area had their VIEW,

machines operating and that they were used at least to soMe degree (though no use statistics were kept).

It further indicates that approximately 175 12th grade

students in Southern Ilighhised the system, and' that 375 did not. (This would

suggest that the data on VIEW Usage obtained through the VIEW use cards may have

underrepresented actual usage as a function of the fact dint the cards were discons.

tinned (by the staff) near the first of March and/or that the cards were not actually filled out by some of the students using the system as a result of lack-of monitoring by schopl staff.)

The fact that 700 students in the 10th grade: nsed the

system

is not an indicator of volunteer, usage, and is partially a' function of theqact that these were essentially demonstrations organized as_;part,of the. student's'. classes,

Tinnily, ;there is some discrepancy in the estimated amount of use of the

VIEW machine according to school staff as opposed.to data collected by the Els.'

----.

School stmt' estimated that approximately 600 Southern students used the VIEW machine during the school year during 1972 7.73.

The) E's could find no substantia-

tion of this figure either in terms of the VIEW use cards oriirt terms of any

other-source of data (including the Project Coordinator). With respect to the development of the system, the system coordinator.-

(who was new to the Project this year) reports that he has spent'a great deal of his time during the past year, attempting to do a "public reiationi job" with the

respect to the other schools having VIEW equipment.

This is not technically-

included in the goal which is currently being discussed, but howeyer apParcUltly has n' gent. deal of operational importance.

In fat

this efifort.has to some

extliteow;tituted an inseryice training experienee which will undoubtedly prove valuable.

In addition, the coordinator has developed clusterings of the VIEW cards

to relate the occupations covered to the 15 HOE: occupational ...clusters!and the

Kuder Interest Tnyent&y. -The remaining effort has been spent on developing:some VIEW tardST

At.the beginning of the school year there were approximately 72 : "occupational"

76

Exhibit-15

BALTIMORE CITY PUBLIC SCHOOLS DIVISION OF GUIDANCE AND PLACEMENT 2418 St. Paul Street Baltimore, Maryland 21218 ---------------May 27-1973

To:

awts.rwrar....?.....1.,...meme.**raornen,w3=9.1

Dr. David B. Orr; Evaluator Maryland Career DevelopMent Project

Subject: ,VIEW Use Survey 1972-1973 From:

George A..Kammerer, Jr., Coordinator VIEW Has VIEW been

:School School Number Name

used in 72 -73

Reader4rinter

Guidance Program? At on their own?

Guidance'Office Guidance Office Art Rm.

Yes

# 41

Hamilton Jr_ High

/I 42

Garrison 'Jr.

# 43

Hampstead Hill Jr. High

# # # # # #

Counselor's Office Woodbourno Jr. Nigh Library Robert Poole Jr. High Lombard Jr. High Guidance Office' General Henry Lee Jr. H. Counselor's Office Calverton Jr. High Library Francis Scott Key Jr. H. Guidance-Office

46 56 57 72 75 76

CI 78 4' 79

#130 # 90 # 91

High

Herring Run Jr. High Harlem Park Jr. High Wm. H. Lemmel Jr. High Rock Glen Jr. High Clifton Park Jr. High Gwynns Falls Pk. Jr. H.

Is VIEWfluseful to .students_ when using

Location of VIEW

Guidance Office Library Library Library Careers RM Guidance Office , Library

Yes Yes Yes No, Career inf. ,--',19es, baSed on em. taken 'away. 71-72-use. Yes Yes Yes ,Yes Yes Yes

Very little. Yes

Very limited.

Yes

Very`limited due to student immaturity.

Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes

,Yes

YesN

Not enough staff, 1 Yes, when used. no.

# 93 #130 #180

Northern. Pkwy. Jr. H. Guidante-OffiCe Booker T. Washington, Jr. Guidance Offide

#1.81.

#222 #230 #233 #239

Cherry Hill Jr. High, Houston-Woods Jr. High Pimlico Jr. High ,Canton Jr. High Roland Park Jr. High Benjaminr Franklin Jr. H: :

Fairmount Hill Jr. ,High

#453

Guidance-Office, Guidance Office: Guidance Office

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

GuidandeAffice

Yes

Visual Aids Room Guidance Office Library

Yes Yes

Yes 'Yes Yes Yes Yes

Yes, limited due to student :immaturity. Yes, although limited.

.

In asurvey of 12th grade students at #70, Southern Senior High Scheibl,, Mr. Jon Frisby, ;Counselor, asked: Have you used the VIEW System? Yes: 175 NO.:.375. Mr. Frisby reports that the Guidanca-progr6m at Southern this year was organized with the 10th grade students being- -introduced by the Counselors to,the VIEW system, and virtually all 700 students used it at that -10Vel%.,_ There was no organized VIEW program for the 12th grade students, since most of these students had already made career choices before the VIEW system was installe4 GAK:BW ire

;14,11-tt.i .

c:

Mr. Niel Carey Mrs. Carolyn Boston Mrs. Charlotte Mebane

/ is

77

cards available.

At the end of February some 12 occupation cards, had been added

--to-that-list-with-another-52-expeeted-by-the-endOk March.

None-of the additional

52 cxpceL'.d by the end of March were actually in the file as of the end of June, and there is no. indication when they'll be ready. ,cards has fallen short.

Thus the productio of new

The target of 150 to 200 cards atated to the E's by the

Coordinator was disavoweld_ky theezroject management, whith emphasized claasiflea-

tion and revision, and there is no specific goal in this area.

A continuing problem with the VIEW system has been the reltability of The machine is simple to operate, but is less trouble -free than

the equipment.

would be desirable for a machine to be used frequently by a variety of people on ..f

Very serious equipment problems were experienced in prior:

an'Jn-and-out basis.

years,- and considerable of the Coordinator's efforts and "PR!' work have been

devoted to smoothing out these problems.

However, there are still significant

difficulties.with the machine, particularly with the respect to the printout function.

As the prototypical Center at Southern was also supposed to be a rglace

where visitors might come to examine the equipment and the usage of the Center, .

the E's requested that the Project Staff establish a log to record the visits: of

This request

oUlside7persons to;the Center over the-period of the. school year

was made in December, but no.log was established until late in the schOol Year.,

- From the time of the establishment of thejog until the end of the evaluation .

.

period, no visitor's had come to examine the Center. .,,

/

.

.

Thus, the gosl has been met in that/the Center has been established, ./.

but the development and' sage ofAhe system have lagged behind expectations., Goal II - Career Education-Leaders A.

Method - 15 teachers will be seletted from among the.. staff o

SouthernEigh School who have attended a minimum of two in-service; .-

.-

.

,,,

experiences orienting them. to career education and to its implications , .-- '..... .. - , for the teaching, of theirHsubject matter. areas. Their involVement and .-. .

;

\

participation will be examined, 11,

Expectedsresults - Certain secondary teachers will have been'

introduced to the implications.of career education for their-own teaching,

Some Of these will have been identified as.leaders due to the extent and .

nature of their, participation in impIementatiOn of departmehta activities.

78

Datn.Collected

tt is_the opinion of the-E's thnt the inservice experiences ns defined above YCV0 never carried cnit

-However, certain substitute experiences took place

which fell cutside of the evaluation clue to their early occurence.

There were two addresses which were made by Dr. Kenneth Hoyt of the University of Maryland on the subject of the explanation of career education and the t,licher'sresponsibility.

These took place at Walbrook High School on

.24,october [972 and at Southern High Schcol on 13 November 1972.

They were

directed to the entire adMinistration and facility of each of the schoolp in question.

It is the understanding of the E's that these two experiences, were

intended to serve the purpose specified by this Goal.

It is the opinion of the

E's that the procedures' operationalized did not meet the Goal as specified..;

However, a week -long Career Fair was held inJanuary at Southern High which greW out of these experiehccs,, and teachers exhibited-substantial motivation, at both schools;

Summary

In summary, it maybe seen that the senior high component of the

project appears to have made'the least progress over the past yearSignifitant problems remain with respect to expanding.the content of thesystem.and the functioning of the equipment. -In-scrVice training and dissemination efforts are not likely .to be successful until these problems are solved. III. 1.6

CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

tho following pages, ARS offers some 'observations and interpretations

based upon the evaluation descrlbed above.

These are; presented according to the

three major. components of the Maryland Career Development Project which were

primarily the subject of the-evaluation_ The ir,tementary Component

Of-the three components studied, the Elementary Component was clearly 1

the,mOst. Ear-reaching and ambitious.

It set out to change behaviors of

Significant numbers oflboth students and teachers with respect to a broad spectrum of cared-r- education variables, only some of which could be measured, in this evaluation. teachers.

The Project yeas most clearly successful with respect to

There-wa-6'ample ,evidence that the Project both provided materials

and experiencestlesigned to influence the teachers in the direction of career education and s'ucceeacd in its efforts to do so.

Teachers responded fnvorably

to the workshops which were held; and expressed the importance of career\educa-

7 9 - -

tion activities at the elementary level.

FurtherMo.e, their daily teaching

activities alsoreflected a strong concern with .career education. Perhaps the most important single impact of the Project was the rEphasis placed on career factors by the elementary teachers.

Although measurable

evidence may be a long time in developingObis the opinion of the E's that this emphnsis cannot but have a strong influence on the later thinking and behavior'of the students:

Although handicapped by the Lack of baseline data, the E's also concluded

that students were making goodprogress in recognizing the occupational attributes of common occupations (i.e., career awareness).' Progress in 'self awareness was

less clear, but evident, at least for some students and some classes. Some recommendations appear warranted: 1.

The device of getting the teachers to participate in the planning.

and design of career educzltion activities and materials through workshops was effective and :should be continued on a periodic basis.

Somewhat greater structure

might.be applied in setting up such workshops, however, including the development of.criteria describing the kinds of outputs desired from the workshop activities. 2.

it was clear .that the Project was more successful .with'seme students

and teachers than with others.

A study should be conducted to determine why.

Such a .study,would involve a much. more intensive effort-than was possible in this evaluation: 3.

The concepts of career awareness and self awareness have-not been

Well defined by the Project Staff in terms of the criterion student behaviors 77-being sought.

Such criterion, behaviors would form a useful framework around

which to organize in-service training experiences, resource ;materials, and classroom activities: 4.

The Resource Guide (Notebook) needs much work with respect to con-

sietency, emphasis, and organization. 5.

The eleffientary effort should be extended to other elementary schools,

probably threugh the medium of futther in,serviceeffortsaad an' improved

noteboA, 6.:

Further efforts to identify and-develop materials suitable for use

in career education, andto make sufficient supplies of the

available, are

warranted. 7

Continuing evaluation procedures should be developed, with the help

of the teachers, and the results of these evaluations should be_systeMaticalry supplied to those engaged in the career. education enterprise.' 80

Systelm-wide coordination should he more systematically planned,

8.

continued, and exte-ud6d; in:-service {_raining and workshops should be conducted early in the

Y.

school year and should draw heavily upon the actual experiences 'of teachers

actively working with caiber education. lt was clear that the career education program must compete For

10.

the time mid attention of teachers and students with other school-programs..

Grebler progres:: would-be facilitated by placing an increased priorityat administrative levels on -career education.

The Junior Mph Schoot Component

7

The core of this component was the attempt to bonduct a work .experience

program For a smaltnumber of "high risk" students at two School.

Special in-

school. Work was'developed to accompany the work experience activities.

Efforts

were Made to generalize those developments in the form of -a model, teaching/.

Aearning packages, andbareer guidanc.

training for counselors.

The work experience portion of'this component appeared to be moderately successful.

The cooperation of 'a number of employers wasenlisted, and modest:

numbers of students .from the two schools held jobs.

There wasan apparent,

though'nbt always significant, continuation of the favorable impact of the program on attendance which:vas seen in formetyears.. Alowever no impact on _

grades waS detectable (thongh only crbde.grade categories could be used in

this assessmen0. Student interest appeare6 to be

high, .though

a number of students dropped out br withdrew- from the program. ..,

Employer ratins

of students' personal characteristics on the job were lower than would he desirable.

Yet many employers had continued their participation from last

year, The workshops associated with this component Were 'generally well-

received, 43 teaching/learning packages were developed at Schoot72,.and'a ,

model was assembled.

However, the teaching/learning packages were ere. developed

without overall planning and prior specification; the model was an asr;emblage

of a varielYof hits and pieces; and neither one, was subjected to meaningful tr you t

ac.seSsment,- and 'revision.

1

The program appeared. to function more effectively at School 80 than at -

School r.

This may have.been hecause of the personnel involved, the

loCt that all students'atkhool 80 w2re.9thgrader,

8,1

the content

,

I

of the_program, and/or the fact: that the students at School 80 were of somewhat

better background than these at School 72. difference at the present time.

No data exist to explain thin

The E's did note,however, that the jobs held

by the students at School 80 seemed to.,be somewhat more varied in nature than those held at School 72.

The following recommendations are offered: 1,

The work experience program should be continued, and greater effort

should be made to locate students in more meaningful jobs. 2,

Considerable developmental work is needed to supply a consistent

theoretical framework and.basis for tying together the various parts represented in the Model.. Without this it is merely .a collection,Of suggestions, whereas it

could be a guide to the development and application'of a variety of career education approaches3.

The teaching/learning packages should be turned over to a small number

of teachers for-trial and study.

These results should be used to guide future,

decisions 'about implementation. 4.

Furthe/r in-service experiences for counselors appear warranted.

However, these should focus on the attempt to define better the role of the counselor-in career education, -and shOuld stress participatory activities. ..\ .

S.

The limited academie-pi-6gram given these students presents a Serious

problem of articulation with a workable high. school program.

In addition, if

the study should drop out, the kinds_efjobs involved in the work experience program so far provide little in the way of skill training ,and have little in the way of a future.

These problems must be addressed and solved before the

work experience program can be considered successful enough for extension to other schools. 6.

Continuing evaWation and feedback is needed.

The Senior. High School Component

Of the three components, it appeared- that the Senior High School Component

had made the leSst progress during the past year

The intention was to establish

a functioning prototype 'Career, Information Center at Southern High School com-

prited.of theVIEW System containing information regarding educational andjocal occupational opportunities.' This center was to be used by students iind'teacherd.

and to serve as a .sort of demonstration center for thqse interested in theprocess.

In addition,'15 Southern teachers were to'be eXPesedlo,two'In-service experiences

focused upon their teaching of their own subjectliatter areas.

In brief,

the Center. was (kstablished in a-senSe, and two geleral lectures on career

education were substituted for the latter goal. Several difficulties with the Center mere-not d.

The equipment continued

to provide'problems; the Centermas often unmannedxcept by the .librarian; 1

only 12 occupations of more thin 50 scheduled were added .to the file during the year;

with the exceptienof'required demonstrations for the 10th

graders,?only a handful.of the more than.2000 students at Southern, and no

visitors, used the Center, according tothe'data.availabIe..

On the positive

side, those students who did use the Center responded quite favorably to it. ?

With respect to the in-service experiences designed to create "career education leaders", the E's are of' the opinion that the lectures substituted

for these experiences-did not met the goal as set orth by the Project Staff. The following recomMendations are offered: 1.

The VIEW equipment has continued to be a problem.

It is recommended

that serious consideration lie given to reorganizing the career information component around different equipment. 2.

Immediate attention should be given to the development of a

more complete file of occupations and to the addition of the occupational cards Originally promised.

The more comprehensive the content of the system,

the more likely it is that it will fulfill the needs of the user (and be used in the first place). 3.

As reactions were,essentiallyfavorable from those who used the

system, it is recommended that a systematic procedure be se I up to expose

all students to the career information system on a regular.basis.

This might

be done through selected classes, through counseling periods, or otherwise, ....

.

but could at leastensure-student familiarity with the system and stimulate subsequent volunteer usage.

Continuing in-service experiences for the counselors and the

--coordinators of each of the schools

using the system should: be scheduled.

These should include snggested -procedures for ensuring student familiarity. ith the sy[3teM.

This should be done immediately, as most of f':e secondary--,:

-schools already have the equipment. .

5.

Continuing systematic:evaluation and feedback-is'ne(ded.

15:1

.83

-

General Summary in yxnerat, the Maryland Career Development Project has met the large .,majority of the goals established for its third year of operatiOn.

MS. judges

the Project to be a successful one, in spite of the fact that much work remains to be done.

Although it is possible that the Project might benefit'from a

consolidal-ion of Project authority within the BaltimOre Schools, there has

apparently been a commendable cooperation among city and state personnel which has facilitated the accomplishments of the Project.

The E's have noted. a

general degree of enthusiasm fof the Project on the part of most of those concerned.

In-serVice training efforts have been generally successful, though'

there was 80MC evidence. to suggest that-less emphasis on speeches and more

emphasis op workshop activities might be desirable, along with somewaht better organization. .

There has been a certain diffuseness in planning which may

be a function of the organization of the Project, and should be tightened up,

More work is needed on'the development of functional and behavioral

goals for the various Project activities.

Better lines of communication

involving.-the actual activities in the classrooms and the field, better

recording keeping, better coordination of activities, better evaluation and feedback planning, etc.,' are all organizational areas which might be improved. However, it is again reiterated that, -he Project has made commendable

strides in actualizing career.education in the Baltimore schools.

In the

-opinion of the E's, the major overall accomplishment of the Project has been to create a widespread awareness and emphasis on career education within the schools which will surely impact all. those exposed to it., The

continuation of Project activities, with the incorporation of the aboVe recommendations, is strongly indicated.

84

APPENDIX A Component Program Descriptions

Elementary Component Progrnm*Description

The following program description is based on information obtained from written reports, descriptions and summaries supplied by Mrs. Audrey CIrcer Exploration Coordinator, Project Schools, Mrs. Nancy Pinson,.

and Mu. OberlinIerri.

Further data was gathered throtigh interviews with

Mrs. Allen, Mrs, Pinson, Mrs. Charlotte Mebane and Mr. Neil Carey. of use were

agenda and written products from the

Also

for Elementary

Resource Component.

The elementary component of the career development program is concerned with "increasing the career awareness and self awareness" of those children it involVes.

Careerawateness has been defined by the

project staff as ..."Career Awareness includes knowledge of the family as a social.institution, knowledge of some basic educational prerequisites for a variety of career options, some knowledge about the range and nature of various job families, knowledge ofvalues essential for the. maintenance

of a democratic society. and'the regulation ofIlumanbehavier and-knowledge of worthwhile opportunities and activities for self. fulfillment."

Self awareness has been defined by the project staff as: "Based on knowledge about self

including abilities, skills, talents,

interests and needs, the student will be Able to describe and demonstrate .. his various abilities and interests.": In order'to carry out this stated goal,eight elementary schools were selected for the program.

These schools

are:

#22

George Washington Elementary School, 800 Scott Street

#35

'Harlem Park' Elementary School,1401 West Lafayette Avenue

#60

Gwynns Falls Elementary School,- 2700 Gwynns Falls-Parkway

#64

Liberty Elementary School, 3901 Main Avenue

#103.

Henry Highland Garnet, 1315 Division Street

#132

-Coppin Elementary School-, 1114 N. Mount Street

#141:

Abe Lincoln Elementary School, 300 N. Payson Street

#144

James Mosher. Elementary School, 100 Wheeler Avenue

Teachers and administrators from these nchools Who volunteered to participate were invited to attend n series of two 2 1/2 day.workshops. The-first workshop was held October5, 6 and:.7, 1972, the second is planned for January 1973.

The first workshop consisted of speeches and

films on Career Ed, panel discussions, work sessions to develop activity sheets. (plans for later programs developed for the unique needs of each

school) and examination and discussion about available resource materials. An attendance goal of one teacher fromstades K-3 and, one teacher from grades 4-6 and one administrator from each school for'each'workshop Thus the total attendance goal-for the first workshop was

was set.

twenty four (16 teachers and 8 administrators)., The actual.attendance was 20 teachers and 2 administrators'.

Most of the administrators that

were invited were assistant principals, a few. were senior teachers. The two administrators that attended were senior teachers.

Due to

admi.nistrative obligations at the beginning of the school .year, the .

Assistant Principals were not able to attend.

In the light of this

unexpected problem, an attempt to interest other senior teachers in

the ro&om is under way.'

however, at least two teachers from each school

did attend and three.schooIs were_represented by more than. two teachers.

The.distribution.of primary and intermediate teachers met the goal stated.

Thse workshops are intended to traim,th6 "leadership cadres" (teacher/administrator groups) from each school to become "in school experts in the implementation of career awareness programs".

They are

.

'to. 'develop leadership goals that havel)een defined as the ability to plan,

operate, and evaluate a career awareness plan as appropriate for the particular school:

During the first workshop,. the teachers, working in

groupt3-cmade up of teachers from each school. and' other groups made up Of

---each gtade level developed: 1)

Plans for the program tobe implemented in each school (called

methods of implementation). 2-)

Suggested 'guidelines for developing and maintaining community

resources. 3)

Career Education activity sheets for each grade level by

related subject,unit. 4)

Evaluative criteria

for each activity,

Thus theJender,ship goals and methods for operation and evaluatien -47

of this program are/underway.

Measures designed to collect eviden'c'e-

of "qualification"through self report (a survey) and inter judge agreement are presently being developed by the project staff.

An attitudinal pre-

test was given by Mrs,. Allen..beforb the first workshop.

The resillts are

no4 yet, available and the post-test replication has not yet been

administered, however plans.have been made to complete these tasks. After the workshop, the ,!'leadership cadres" are to meet with other teachers 'in their school.

They arc to pass on their skills and knOwledge ,!)

to other teachers in the school as well as to the children they teach or in the case of the .administrators, to the children with Which they

come in contact in the course oftheir activities. Ultimately then, theideal,result would be that-all 1,400.students in these schools will benefit from the knowledge gained at the workshops through the 24 volunteers expected to attend.

The teachers are then to plan activities outlined on the activity sheets that they developed.

These activities are of three basic types.

The first basic type include in class activities.direaly involving only the students and the teachers.

The major protions of time has been planned to be filled by class discussions.

-A number of units are available :from .Mrs. Allen.

They are

concerned with such topics as water power, city life and the police

These resource materials ContainAlabvmation to be passed

department.

on to the .students, suggestions for sources of further information topics

for discussion and specific questions to stimulate the students thinking. Other in-elass activities include:

drawing pictures of family members

or people in various dccupations bringing reference materials into the class-. room for students to use, having students write 'letters for more information,

using magaines and newspapers as sources for current occupational needs and problems of the society, have the students write stories about people in specific occupationS or play their roles, devise games involving work related concepts, relate arts and crafts to real life occupations involving such skills and designing and assembling a bulletin board which, for example, reviews each occupation learned about as. they are studied.

Secohdly, the

teacher is to develop a list of resource people available to come into the

class and discuss their-oecupationsand relate topics.

Pcssible sources

for these Asitors include parents, relatives and family friends of students, ,

.

_

.

members of.- community groups:such an senior citizens, and citizens who

work in Thearea.

The children are encouraged to think out questions in

ndvance.and''to interview and discuss their ideas with the visitors:

Finally, the children are to be taken on field trips to various places of business, agencies, museums - places where they may learn about. the

world outside of school.

The teacherd are encouraged to share their ideas and experiences with .other teachers -directly or through,the coordinator.

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION, JUNIOR HIGH

COMPONENT

The following program description is based on information obtained from written reports, dencriptionn and summaries suAilied by Mr. Yancy Whittaker, Junior High Coordinator,

.

John F. Berrente,teacher-coordinntor, Mr. John,,,

Wool.eord,,tencher-coordinator, and Mr. Niel Carey, Director, Maryland Cqreer Development Project.

Also data ha been gathered -through.interviewa with

Mr. Carey, Mr. Whittenker, Mr. .Berrente, Mr. Woolford, Mr. Leon Lerner (counse lor, General Henry Lee Junior High School)::

The Junior High School component of the Maryland career Development program hns been implemented in two Baltimore City Junior High Schools; Rock Glen Junior High and General Henry Lee Junior High.

The schools are.

quite different in that Rock Glen is basically a suburban school in a fairly new building with mostly middle-classatudents while General. Henry Lee is an inner-city school in a very old structure with studenta largely

from a loweocio-economic background.

Due to these and other differences

the Junior High component has-,been tailored to the unique needs of each

schools students and two-different programa have emerged.

The common

expected result of those programs is that the students will exhibit improved attendance and school achievement.

This is to occur as the result of the

institution of work-oriented programs at theae two schools.

Beyond this,

however, additional objectivea, have been developed at each school:

In order

to demonstrate the emphasis of each program, a review of these objectives will be followed by a description of the program at each school.

The Work-Oriented .CompOnent nt Rock Glen Junior High School

OBJECTIVES

1.

To help students develop basic Job related skills, attitudes, and understandings which will enable them to live economically productive lives.

2.

To provide daily classroom contact with students for'the purpose of: a.

Providing immediatennd timely counselling and guidance relating to work eXperience on an individual and group basis.

b.

Creating'a Close and confidential relationship between' coordinator and student.

c.

Collecting and maintaining records pertaining to personal data, employment data and school status of stud'ents,

3.

To use the'classroom situation as a "laboratory' in which actual work experiences can be shared, examined, and analyzed.

4.

To help students prepare for, and adjust to, what in many instances may be: their very first job experience.

5.

To provide remedial work, through job related exercises,in basic skills of handwriting, arithmetic

.

spelling, and oral communications.

To develop a knowledge, understanding, and an appreciation of the principles and concepts -inherent to American business.

develop a knowledge and understanding of the techniques used in job seeking, 'employment testing, and the job interview 8.

To develop aknoWledge and understanding of city; state

and

federal taxes leveied on wages and income as well as on the 1

.

employer's payroll, r..ndthe benefits derived th-Orefrom. .

To develop an awareness of accident hazards.inherent in various

.

typeaof employment and to encourage the practice of safety habits. 10.

To help students understand'union-management relationships.

11.

To acquint students with laws relating. to employment of youth,

including regulations as to age, hours of employment, and type of employment.

12.

To provide an opportunity for inveatigation.of career opPertunitica and tlreits of vocational interest in the light of newly acquired work experience.

13.

To use the studenetvwork experience as a basis for understanding and practicing budgeting, saving, and Credit-.

14.

To developa knowledge, understanding, and:Appreciation of management's point of iew in their attempt to carry, out responsibilities and achieve objectives.

There are,at the present time, 42 ninth grade atudents.in.the work-oriented: program at Rock Glen.

ThcsC students were selected as a result of their poor

attendance and grades - when it has been shown that these students are under,schieveing and additionally, as a result of stores on an attitude measure.

Generally, performance.of the student in the eigth grade is used as the determinate of whether. the student. Will be included in the program.

The number that can be

involved is determined by the space available in the program due to the work load of the personnel.. As this time, there is a waiting.list of students 1 _

qualified to participate for Whom there are no facilities available. The coaiiseloe,after speaking with the student and his parenti seeks to

arrange employment locally for the student.

The students work in pair*at each

job so that student, A works.., or one week at S. job while student B attends school.

and the net week.studentAl :works at that same job while student A goes to school. The prospective employees are approached and employees and student pairs are matched by the couustlor. will work for him.

The employer has no say in the selection. Of which student There has been no cost to the employer in the past so "there

has been no problem in getting'cooperation_from.them.

A transition is now being

made to partial payment of students wages by the employer.

All additional costs

are borne by the project.The student is paid $1.00 to $1.20 an hour for assisting his employer in various tasks assigned.

The program-begins with an orientation

period called "The World of Work'' during which the students receive instruction on work habits and skills.

While in school the student receives special classes in the regular subjects offered but in a more_tondensed,form.

This way he is able to keep pace with the

other utudnin and will not

e behind when he returns to a normal schedule in

Senior Hir,h School.

In some case, the initial job asaignmentsAre,not completely satisfactory. Adjustments are then made in an effort to match employe'rs,and students in.a satisfactory arrangement for all,concerned.

p

-

The Work-Oriented Component at General Henry Lee Junior High School OBJECTIVES 1.

To provide meaningful learning experiences, both academic and work-related.

2.

To develop desirable habit. in "high-risk" students which will allow them to, feel comfortable in school attendance; to develop desirable personal'

habits which will allow such studenta to adjust in out-of-ichnol situations involving inter-personal relations. 3.

To;develop desirable attitudes so as to be able to adjust to varying.experiences both in and out of school:

to.be able to meet typical demands made

upon them without developing negative reactions.

4.

To assume positive responses within school and work settings 'so as to desire

continuance at school and work, thereby reducing threats of absenteeism from

.

school or work. 5.

To demonstrate that work is a valuable resource at the 7th grade' level for

the purposes stated, as an adjunct to the curriculum, and should be included as part of planned curriculum. 6.'

To involve non-school personnel in direct contact with 14 and.1.5-year old

students as instructors and supervisors; to develop a cadre of such non:;ehool personnel as a group of resource personnel in the community to act_

in liaison with the school. 7.

To develop in'"high-risk" students a program in which they can share

suc-

cessful experiences, thereby developing positive self-concepts. The students who are selected for the program are those who have been labeled "high risk".

"High-risk" means the student is: 14-15 years old, absent in three

quarters-ofachool

no more or no less than about 139 days (thus indicating

desire for school), academic failure due to absence rather than lcw academic aptitude, general reading ability between 4.0 and 6.5 on Iowa Reading test, and general apathy in the student.

These children generally come from the inner city,

art both black and white, from large families with a low level of income, many with fathers not at home.

Many of the students are already work-oriented since

they hive been helping, at home or in neighborhOod jobs.

have delinquent records.

2.-

Only a few of these students

At this JOnior High School the work - oriented program extends from the 7th

grade thrOugh theth grade.

A student 'may begin fhe program in the 7th, 8th,

or.9th grade but most pnrticipate for the entire three years.' At thin time, there are 30 ntudenta in the work-oriented components at General Henry Lee. After initial selection, the students are interviewed by Mr. Leon Lerner, 1

a counselor. Then parental permission is obtained through a letter which is sent home explaining theprogram.

It tells them that their child hen been

-Chosei for the work ntudy-program which means that the child will report to

school in the morning, attend..three clanses.which involve the teaching of skian needed for employment (Math, English, Work Skills, etc.), at 11:30 they will eat lunch at nchool and then report to work (for no more than 20 hours a we k). The students will be paid by. the project approximately $1.00 an hoUr (thin coot is et this

tit.i .!

being partially assumed by the employers), and the students muat

maintain satisfactory attendance in order to remain in the program. If the parents signify approval by returning the bottom their signature the necesdary paper work is begun.

of the letter With

(Students who are between

14-18 must apply for a Maryland work permit and all students must have Ssocial security number.)

The coordinator then seeks employment for the child by con-

tacting local small tisinessmen.

They are informed about the program, told that

they are CO teath,various skills related to obtaining and retiiining work:

It

.

is aldo pointed out that any problems which might arise will be worked out in a. confrontation between supervisor, student and teacher-ceordinator.' With the,. agreement of the employer, an interview is arranged after which a

time card is issued to the student to be kept and completed by him.

After place4

mentan employment certificate for employees 14 to 18 yeaxs,oldis executed.: ,A bi-7deekl:y invoic.,. is kept which is used to verify the time worked and checks

are issued from this invoice.

The staff continues to work with the students to insure that the placement is satisfactory.

If there are'prOblema an attempt is made to continue senrching

until tilt,. right combination of student and employer is found.

Although no specific data will be presented until_ the' completion of the third.

quarter, reports from bath schools have been very positive.

Both of the staffs

have expressed pleasure over the results of the program - they report encouraging changes in nttendnnce and grades in most cases and also report satisfaction on the part of employers.

.

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION, SENIOR HIGH COMPONENT

The following program description is based on information Obtained from written reports, description!, andpamphlets supplied by Mr. George Kammerer, Jr.,. VIEW coordinator:

6rther data.was gathered through interviews with Mr.

Kammerer and.ohservation of the Occupational Information Center at Southern High School. Alsoluse has .been ride of data collected from students at Southern 'High School._

The Senior High component of the Career, Awareness Program consists of the

establishment of.d Prototype Career_Information Center.

The major component

of this is the development and use of the VIEW (Vital Information for Education & Work) System.

,

This systeMis designed to eliminate some of the problems

guidance counselors encounter when gathering and disseminating career information to students.

It is expected that the center will be used by students,

teachers and counselors.. It is hoped that as a result, VIEW -All save time for the counselor and cut down on duplication of effort while making current, inexpensive and localized .career and educational information and readily'

accessible to all students.

Information in the form of individual occupational summaries for the system is collected by the VIEW Coordinator and put in the form of a "VIEW Scripts."

The VIEW script contains such ,information as:

1.

Minimum schooling required

2.

Rueommended high school subjects

.3.*

Course of study after high school

4.

Prospects. and Opportunities'within the local area

5.

Opportunities for advancement

6.-

Additional information about the job including salary schedule,

work hours and sources of other.descriptions

7.

Public School '.Graining. Program information

8.

Local contact persons who will explain further about the ;]ob

9.

Items to read about the job.

10. Information on related jobs listed in VIFW Also, an effort is being made to include cards with information about local educational institutions and oppottunities both 'technical and academic.

(The coordinator plans to update and revise the scripts as necessary.)

The

coordinator takes the script,, which Tuns from.1 to 4, 8 1/2 x 11 pages and

is illustrated with eye catching pictures and makes it ready for reproduction. lie uses a microfilm Process - Camera to photograph'all .four pages on one frame of film.

A Card-to-Card Copier is used to reproduce as many cards as are needed;

Each participating school receives a complete deck of all the cards which have currently been produced.

At the beginning of this school year approximately

72 cards were available; presently there are 84 different occupation and 'education cards in use with another 52 (28 of which,will be health related) expected by the end of March.

This will bring the total to 136 with an end

of the school year goal of between 1507200'cards.

an order to make use of these aperture cards, Microfilm Reader-Printers have been made available to the participating high schools.

The model school

for this program is Southern High and is. the only center considered in this evaluation.

The Reader-Printer can be-used by a student with' only'a small

amount of instruction. from a teacher or counselor.

The occupation. and/or

education cards .of interest are selected from the indexed file of cards 'accompaning the machine.

The user then places the. card in the machine and is

able to scan and read the information as It appearb on the viewing screen. If he wishes to have a copy of any or all of these pages for his further use, he can push a button and receive the copy in a matter of moments.

2

APPENDIX B

Transcript of Elementary School Observations (8 schools)

SUMMARY OE OBSERVATIONAL VISITS, 'ELEMENTARY COMPONENT, MARYLAND CAREER EDUCATIONAL PROJECT, 14 AND 15 FEBRUARY 1973.

The first school which was visited was #35, Harlem Park Elementary.

'Harlem Park is an ESE school where most of the children receive free lunch. There are approximately 900 children in grades K through 6, and there are 25 teachers.

It. is a relatively new school where the. Principal is Lester

Hudgins, and the senior teacher is Mrs. Loggins.

The first class observed

was a 6th grade class taught by Mrs: Hendricks. Mrs_. -.- Hendricks' class was divided into three groups on the basis of

reading ability:

A grade 3, a grade 3-4, and a grade 4 level.

Mrs. Hendricks

worked first with the 3-4 level where the-assignment was based on the previous '

day's reading selection which was about Leonard Bernstein.

The teacher re-

viewed the story by asking questions to bring out various jobs within the field of music in which Bernstein had engaged:. pianist, teacher, author, and conductor.

This was combined with word meaning and dictionary drill, oral

reading, and lots of questioning.

The assignment for this group was to write

a paragraph about Bernstein including information about his family, chilahood, interests, schuoling, opportunities; accomplishments which they admired, and his habits which led to success. .

The grade 4 level group had read a story on pottery hats,

Mrs. Hendricks.

did not spend as much time with them and did not distusS pottery (but may

tomorrow).

A Korean story was assigned for. tomorrow (which appeared to be less

career - awareness- oriented than some of the other material), ....... _

MrS, Hendricks spent most of the time with the level 3 group which had read a story about Fireman P,,t.

are different (brave)

She brought out where fireman work and why they

and used questions directed toward the equipment and

features of the fireboat.

Further questions concerned what firemen do when they

are not f[ghting fires an'd why.

The discussion then turned to a previous story

about another worker who was n fruit peddler; why his business was good and bad; and what characteristics of his job led him to decide to change to operating a-fruit stand.

She asked what made him a good salesman and covered a number

of key words'inword drills (such as difficult, vacant, stand, shiny, harbor, market).

She then asked' about characteristics necessary to be a salesman (nice,

polite, clean, not"gruff, good manners, honest, etc.).

The reader being used

was not a special reader selected by Mrs. Allen; the main difference with respect to Mrs. Hendricks activities is the fact that she now emphasizes more of the career related ideas associated with the stories in these readers-bringing out the business activities Of the people.in the stories and so forth.

Mrs.

Allen agrees that the clear difference in the program is more the difference in emphasis rather than just differences in materials. Mrs. liendticks then discussed perSons in the story in terms of a. chart ,

comprised of columns headed by "person" "job" "products".and "facts about jobs." ExampleS were Joey's mother who was, a baker producing doughnuts and coffeecakes

and had to be dependable and clean; Joey's father was unemployed and produced no products as a result of automation and the fact that it is hard to get a

job without a skill or trade. The lesson concludeTwith questions about what the children would like to be and why.

The. answers Were mostly On sales, and Mrs. Hendricks asked them to -

think about who in their neighborhood was in sales (including the paperboy or girl).

.I did not note particularly the posters in this room althought I presume there were some there because most of the rooms appeared to have posters and ,pictures around the room which bore. on aspects of career education..

one list posted in this room of six questions: is career education?

2,

What are careers?

3.

these are a.s folloWs:

Why do people work?

There was 1.

4.

What What

preparation must be made for :work? 6.

5.

What work isavailable in our society?

flow .do careers affect out ,lives?

The second room visited was a fourth grade class taught by-Mrs. Margaret Dunlap.

In working with the whole clasa,.Mrs, Dunlap rend poems about a

librarian, milkman, nurse, etc.,froni a paperback book called "Careers A to Z".

Afterwards she pointed out that the "Character Guide" shows how people grow from babies to your size to adults and she asked the kids, "what do you do at each stage?"

Mrs. Dunalp then worked with the children asking them what they

did as a little boy or girl, something they do now, and something they will do when older.

They were supposed to have drawn some of these things in pictures.

Most of the "something that., they would be when they were older" were occupation-

related,'including operating a lunch counter, being a doctor, a baseball Player,, store owner, football player, nurse, singer, basketball player, fireman, teafcher, etc.

Mrs, Dunlap did not comment about any of these things.

The rest of-this

period was then spent listening to the children read back what they had written about their pictures along these three topics.

There were quite a few roomdecorations of a career awareness nature here, includiny; board posters with pictures of people in 11 jobs and the job names in,

volved; also a Series-of Black Americans of repute posted across the top of the board with printed descriptions of their work. .After the period Mrs,. Dunlap briefly mentioned that She and her class had interviewed the school secretary and the school custodian, and, that she'had had

the class help to make choir robes from bed sheets, giving them some ideas about assembly lines and sewing machine usage.

She also used this exercise, plus

doubling recipes for fudge-making as practical mathematic4 exercises. The second school visited was school #141 Abraham Lincoln Elementary School, where the principal is Mrs. Rosalind Lee. in grades K through 6.

There are 729 students in 22 classes,

About 50% of the students parents are on welfare, and

'

.

some 6.1.

hro in the school lunch program.

The first teacher visited wan n Mrfl. Conway, grade

was segregated into twogroupn.

.

Again the chino

Group 2 was engaged in a group rending of a

poem about differences and similarities in children and people (such nn: Do all people have children? things?

Do all people look alike?

Do people like the name.

Do all people wonder about these things?), The other group worked with

the teacher' who, using pictures of family activities on an easel, stimulated questions about family life.

The children had written and drawn pictures about

something to do at hemp in their free time, and the children then read their.

own stories.and explained their pictures.

The object of the lesson was to get

across. the similarity in what people do with their free time.

Wall decorations in this room included:

'Black Americans and their job

descriptions; questions about self; a poster showing that some faMilies are different: fmnilies of the children in the room in story form; etc. The second teacher in this school was Mrs. Gloria Dorsey, 3rd grade.

Mrs.

Dorsey held a group session in which the children were asked what they wanted to do when they grew up and why, stimulating answers, of all kinds: man, siny,,er;

teacher, police-'

fireman, teacher, painter, nurse, and so forth (some reasons in-

eluded practical:ones like making money).

One of the exercises which 0.1s under-

taken in this class was going through a job application,

Mrs. Dorsey had placed

a job application on the front board and through the words and the meanings of the terms in the job application.

The application blank-was read as a group

reading chore and then blanks were passed out for'the children to work on. children

The

then asked to fill out job applications with respect to the jets

that they would like to do when they grew up.

(In this case the teacher had a

tendency to use words that were too tough for the kids and she failed to repeat :things that the kids said so that everyone would hear.) verbally through the procedures of finding a job.

She tried to take-them

How would you go about finding -7

Wimt. would be the :ourcen that you would look in and what would you do,

job?

how would yof apply, how would you ;et: there, and no forth. Posted on this room on the bulletin board were about twenty namen from doctor to dog catcher; tho job application blank referred to above; picture stories 1)V children; the Black American series in the world of work; a poster with questi.ons for interviewing, including: do?

Do you make a lot of money?

What do you lila??

Where do you work?

Do you like to work?

Why did you choose that career?

That do you

What do you dislike?

There were also photos of

various john on the walls, and lists of the job categories of those workmen who built houses.

While half the children worked on filling out the application blank the other half of the class wrote sentences about why they wanted to do a given job and they drew a picture illustrating it. On the way to the final class it was noted that. in the Ball there were

posters of city workers and printed pictures of children's stories illustrating various jobs.

The final class visited was Mrs. Fowlkes, Grade 6.

This class had prepared

to interview a man from_outside about his job, and Mrs. Fowlkes had previously assigned the review of a set of rules for interviewing.

The children conducted

the interview (which was tape recorded for a later study) with a Mr. Simmons who was quite a diversified man and perhaps not a good subject for this kind of exercise..

Various questions'in the interview included information such a

location?

flow much education is required? -What. other jobs have you had?

equipment do you use?

Do you like yOur job?

job.

:

What

Would you like to have other jobs?

What do you think of, education? etc.

Posted around the room was again the Black American series and a career awareness bulletin board with student pictures.and stories. about "what I would like to he rand why." 1

.

-

Summary 'of Observational Vipita 3/6j0.2 George Washington Elementary Schdol

The Principal of this ESEA Title I school in Mrs. Alma McAvory, .approximately

690

:students in George Washington School (#22).

'class visited was n 'third grade taught by Ms. Cheryl Lanterna. .Lesson

The.firnt

about the job application, what things an and phy.

.

She began the

with a question and answer session about looking for a job.

sion Centered around'good grooming - why it's necessary.

There are

The discus-

The class then talked

employer would heed to know about you -

Then four children played roles to demonstrate then right and wrong

ways to apply for a job.

One child played the role of the employer who interviewed

three different applicants for a sales job.

The first slouched in her chair, acted

indifferent and didn't know the answers to all the questions asked of her.

The

second applicant wore an oversized sloppy sweater, had had a number of jobs and appeared lacy.. The third student was dressed neatly and was polite, .experienced. and Appeared ambitious.

After the role playing, the class was asked who they

would hire for the job and why.

It was clear that the students understood the les-

son that had been demonstrated. The next class visited was Mrs. Winkler'S fourth grade.

paring for an afternoon visit to the local art museum.

The class was pre-

There was first a question

and answer session about museums and art - what kinds of things are found in a museum, for example.

The teacher had on display several prints of famous paintings -

she led the students in a discussion about styles of painting.

The group then

mentioned names of careers already discussed - after which they were given questions to answer. about jobs they hadn't talked about befOre

They worked in groups of

about 4 or 5 using the dictionary to find out answers to such questions as - "Is A diplomat someone who makes diplomas or someone who tries to solve international problems?"

(The 'group was a.t_first certain he makes diplomas but after research

changed their minds).. Some other words discussed were curator, phijanthropist, veterinarian and archaeologist.

Some students had prepared special reports on

various artists, which they then presented orally to the clans as we departed. We then observed a sixth grade class taught by Ms.. Jackie Burgess,

There was A display is the room with information and letters about various careers received by the students in response to letters they had written to companies, Schools and the military.

Also, there was a classroom johhulletin board.

The class operates on

employment service for jobs to be done in the room-students fill out applica-. tions, arc interviewed and then,

f hired, are rated weekly on their performance.

The teacher divided the class into reading groups_

Two of the groups worked

on non - career oriented reading materials (as far as I could tell).

Some worked

in work-books while others answered questions about their reading materials.

The third group discussed with the teacher a story they had read.about.anell year old boy who was dreaming so hard aboUt his future career that he fell out of his chair in school. The group then diScussed various aspects of the career .that he

had chosen (being a pilot or captain of a spaceship).They talked

about that. job

field, the job name, the duties, the necess4, skills, the kind of job, what. kind

of person could hold that job and the main equipt.necessary

for the job._

The last class visited in #22 was Mrs. Beverly's first grade, The class had apparently been discussing hospital personnel in an earlier. lesson and they briefly

reviewed the names of hospital employees that they could remember.(they could only remember.a few with prodding froM the teacher*. The new lesson was to take up a discussion .of'school personnel beginning with the school secretary, Mrs. Bell, ..

who was to be interviewed by the class. 1'

BeforebanA,the group briefly listed some

questions that they wanted to ask Mrs. Bell but the children 'did not appear very

interested or to clearly understand the assignment. Mrs. Bell was brought into the room* and was asked the questions that had previously been suggested Mr3,

and then left.

6ovurly said that the class had been progressing from. job family to job family;_

and would interview one more person in the school and then move onto discuSsing people involved in police work.

;.ummarYOf ObServational Visits 2/27 1160 Gwynn Valls Elementary School

The principal at thin school is Mrs. Wilson and the students come from an economic background of middle Co low middle to low. 900 students.

The-school has about

The first class visited was Mrs. Brooks! 1st grade.

Displayed

around thc room was a bulletin board dealing with self-awareness, pictures drawn by the children demonstrating various emotions and a display entitled my joh

I need.

The teacher conducted a question and answer session about

what the children want to be when they are older.

Such answers as:

fireman,

nurse, singer, teacher; maid, and bus driver were .received.. Each child had

written a story about the job'Oat he picked - a number of these were read to the cln=

people work.

by their authors..

The teacher then4ead-a-discirssion about why

They discussed three categories of reasons - to pay bills, to

gain pleasure (vacations, etc.), and to help others. in groups ;(1e.ording to the jobs they had chosen.

The clas's was then divided

They were ,stationed at learning

centers which were equipped with reference materials about their chosen careers. The children-workedfurther-on-beeks they they were assembling about those careers... listing nuch things. as tools.and skills necessary for that job.

This was a

demonstration of the interdisiplinary approach which makes use of many different types of skills - in this case - writing, reading, and research skills were combined. The ucid: class visited was a 6th grade taught by Mrs. Craig.

It' was pointed

out that Mrs. Craig had taught this same group of students through the 4th and 5th grades as well.

There were a number of career*information posters around the

room about, various occupations:.

The leSson observed was a reading class for

which the class-was divided into three groups..

Group I.worked on an individUalized

reading progTam which consists of reading beaks selected from a package of 100 available to the students. Group II was beginning .a new reading book - not

career orienLed, and at the time of observation they were rending a poem about the new book, into a tape recorder and playing it back.

Group III's lesson took

up the major part of the period while the pther groups continued to work on their own.

This group had been reading short biographies about famous people.

They each chose their favorite person and wrote a paragraph about them.

After

a

reading those aloud to the group, the students matched careers to all the names of the people read about to test their 'retention of the reading assignment.

The

group was than assigned two tasks. - one was to do research about the person,

chosen and then list five facts about them-and their jobs in a booklet given to them by the teacher,

(Later, all of the group's contributions were to be filled

in in all of the booklets.)

Secondly, the students were to look in the classified

section of the newspaper (these were provided to each child) for ads about jobs he thinks the person that he chose might apply to and add these to the booklet. If there were no jobs advertised that applied to that faMous person chosen, then the student was to write a "position wanted" ad for that person and add it to the booklet.

Work was begun on this task.

Summary of Observational Visits 3/14 #64 Liberty Elementary School

The evaluator was met at school #64 (Liberty Elementary School) by Mrs. Gertrude Faber, the school's senior teacher. .

Mrs. Faber described the school

as one with well over 1200 students, K-6, which due to the fact that it has always exceeded the guidelines for academic and economic level, has never had However, approximately 650 students are on the free school.

Title 1 status. lunch program.

The school, whose. principal is Mr. Robert Curland has 35

regular classroom teachers plus a music teacher, a gym teacher, an art teacher, a reading teacher, a librarian, and a senior teacher.

This school is a "Right

to Read" pilot school (1 to 6).: The first class visited was Mrs. MattisOn's second grade.

The lesson began

with a question and answer period about what the students would.like to be and why and what they would not like to be and why not.

A child was then selected to

read a list entitlad "Careers We Know" (about 40).

The class then played several

games - "Choose a Career" - pick a name of a career Out of a box

role play -

class guesses which career is being imitated. 1.

telephOne operator

2.

bus driver

3.

poliCeman

4.

nurse

5.

baseball player

6.

mailman

Class identified all easily

."What's my line" - Students read descriptions of duties - class guess occupation (this exercise made use of reading skills) '1.

architect

Class, also easily

2.

clerk (store)

identified these

3.

minister

........

The clans then discussed the Job application - what must you know in order to complete it?

Clans answers:

how to rend how to spell

what job you are applying for how to follow directions etc.

What might they ask for on an application? Answer: .age, name, etc.

The teacher then Tassed out sample applications for the class to fill out and helped them do it. There were a number of career oriented displays around. the room "Someday I will be:" '(pictures drawn by students and labeled as to career -

booklets about, careers on a display table

"asT see myself" - selfportraits (self awareness) -

-

many pictures of various working people posted around the room 40\ thy e.lass prepared career awareness folders containing all the activities pe.infnEng to career awareness that they have been working on for example: wold lists, woTk:,hupts, - pnpors entitled what I want to be rind why.

Mrs. Beard's second grade wns the next class visited.

The career au,rt.ness

displays in this room consisted of pictures of various people labled with their careers and n bulletin hoard of career riddles (who am I?) The class briefly discussed research (about jobs) - Where would you look? They listed encyclopedia;;, dictionaries, maps, books, newspapers, and magazines.

Three girls gave reports on the careers that they would like to have.

The girls

had done research work at the library (with the-rest of the class) and had brought in visual aids and drawn pictures to illustrate their talks. to be a veterinarian.

The first girl wanted

She read her report about the schooling required, various

duties, needs of the 'community for a veterinarian., settings that one might work

in, and her desire to work with animals. tools used and explw ined their purpose.

She used a toy doctor's bag' to allow

She showed pictures of a veterinarian in

The second girl wanted- to be the firn lady

the city, country, zoo, and circus. ...

astronaut.

'Her report also included duties, education, special training, and

details about this job.

'Her pictures showed such things as the position of the

astronaut during takeoff, the space suit and a blast off. jar of "Tang" and "Spacefood Sticks ".

Her visual aids were a

The third student wanted to be a writer.

Tier report told of how a writer makes his own hours and schedule, can live where he likes, needs relatively' few tools and many do many different kinds of writing stories, poems, etc,)

She showed pictures of famous black writers, read a poem by

one of. them and read.a short story she had written about the rewards of being a good girl.

A tape was then played of an interview done by a girl in the class of her mother who is a Psychiatric nurse.

She asked about her duties, education, what

else she'd like to be and why - what she would not like to be and why not. In Mrs, Byer's.room her fifth graders had displayed pictures that they had, done of futiire careers entitled "My Choice."

There was also a bulletin board with

career infdrmation under it and a poster with a list of occupations involved with drugs. . Mere were many drug oriented displays and posters in the room,

The clAs

was combintng'n unit on drug education with Career Education.

Two customs inspectors came to the room and showed a 30 minute film about drug detection in customs inspection.

The class then, after the movie, asked the men

about their jpbn, education, duties, hours, etc. the "customs job family".

Thep they listed various jobs in

Mrs, Byers submitted a sheet of activities done.by the

...

class relating to career awareness (attached). The last class to be visited at school 164 was a fifth grade taught by Mrs. Westmoreland.

This class was also involved in a unit about drug education which they

were relating to career education.

Mrs. Westmoreland began by asking the clans to review the four purposes of drugs 1.

to prevent disease --

2.

to relieve pain

3.

fight diseave

4.

control disease

She then led the class in a discussion about certain vocabulary words pertaining to drugs and showed names of things asking the class, whether. they were drugs or not.

-(1111 of these activities were a review.)

The new lesson concerned "workers whO are working to educate people against drug abuse."'

The class was divided into three groups. .

Group I - read newspaper,articleS about drug education and listed those professions involved.

Group II - listened to a tape about drug education made by the.teacher. then to answer these questions.:

They were

"Who are some of the workers or what are some of

the agencies which are.working to solve the drug problem throdgh education?"

"What

specifically is being done?" Group III - worked with the teacher at first.

They, were to list the media used for

drug abuse information - television, newspapers, discussions, radiodoctors, insurance companies.

They then discussed what they do and why..

Mrs. Westmoreland

had several ads from various media which the group discussed together. There was one career information bulletin board display in the room however, most of the space in-th-e'room was covered with drug abuse education information.

Summary of Observational Visits 3/23 #103 Henry Highland Carnet Elementary School

4:t7g

The observational visit to #103 wan conducted differently than the visite to. the other schools.

Instead of the usual 30 to 45 minute presentations-in 3,

each classroom, we observed a joint project being undertaken:bythe two classes involved in the career education program at that school.

In addition :he F

observed activities . conducted by other groups in the school were are not

.

apart of the-program. Mrs,- Stern's 1st grade and Mrs. Bryzman's 6th grade are involved in a unit about the bakery.

They have viewed a movie and a film strip about people who

work in a bakery and their Jobe.

In order to 'raise money to buy seeds for a. "spring

planting" nnd to learn more about jobs in a bakery the children decided to haVe They worked in groups of about ten(mixed 1st and 6th grades) in the

a bake sale.

school cafeLeria making cakes and cookies from, mixes and materials donated by ,

parents,

.

They also designed posters listing prices and advertising their sale.

A small group of children prepared an oral advertising "pitch" and went throughott the school, telling about the sale.

The actual sale was conducted each day

during the week right after school hours. easily sold their wares.

Many parents came and the children

While other children baked some of the older children

came to the first grade Classroom and acted as "secretaries" - i.e. the first graders told stores about. the movie on the bakery and their own baking experiences

and the sixth graders helped to write them down.

This project incorporated career

awareness with lessons on math, reading, writing, art, health and nutrition. A spacial reading teacher took her. students (a mixed class of 1st and 6th.

graders) to community businesses. took their pictures.

The children interviewed various workers and

After returning to the school,. they made posters. using the

pictures taken and made booklets of stores written about the.workers and their Jobe.

(Based on their interviews.)

A.numher of displays were noted in Mrs. Stern and Mrs. Bryzman's classr6oms as well an in some others,

A first grade had a display of folders entitled "as

see mysolf" which included pictures,' map of their neighborhoods

facts about

themselves and paragraphs about "what)I want to be and why". Other displays were "who am I?" and "my family;" "my finger-prints_are me"; a

animal careers"; and "how are people alike and different?" .

This is a Title .I school (Mrs. Mohammed is the principal) which has been

condemned and will.not-be used next year.

0".

School. #I32 - Coppin Elementary School 5/16/73

Mrs. Lucille Williams is the principal of this school. visited was .0111c Smith's second grade.

The lesson observed was about the super-

market - the jobs of all those that work there. of displays on the topic around the room.

The first class

There was a very large number

Titles, of some of these were:

Where food comes from ..--

'/ruck;: to the supermarket ShoppluL; at. the Supermarket

A picture dictionary including such words as: Supermarket carts Dairy foods Produce department Merit department

Butcher Bagger

Check out counter Conveyor belt Elevator Unloading. platform

Stamper

Cauh register Scale.

The Produce department The Supermarket Manager

What's in a Supermarket The Meat Department! Our talking list (Supermarket; grocery store, etc.)

There was also aboard of pictures of people working

The teacher started thu lesson by asking the clnss questions Define work?- they decided work iS using energy to do something or work is using energy to make something What kind of work have you seen?

Why do people work?

(class listed workers)

(class listed such things as to get things, money food etc.)

The class then read a poem about what they would like to be - someday and they acted out parts.

When asked what they want to be they answered: Nurse

Fireman Teacher

Policeman Mechanic.

Then Miss Smith talked about goods and services using a chart - had them point to goods and.services, and pick up examples of goods from the table _J

They then chose pictures of workerS for producers 'of goods and service producers

Dentist Butcher Grocery .store clerk

Florist

Baker

Drugist The class next sang a song about workers and identified the workers in it.

the.class used role play to talk about the different supermarket workers; dressed in costumes and had many props available.

Finally

They were

Children playing the role_of, alnother

and her children went to the store and went from worker to worker asking them about .

.

their jobs (they were store manager, producman, butcher, stock clerk,. check out clerk)

I then obnerved a brief presentation in Mrs. Melvina Byrds Special Education class.

A vtudvnt went from student to student asking him what his job was, why he

liked it, what tools he used.(had.some on his desk)

The

jobJwere:

Policeman,

MUsician Janitor :

Supermarket clerk. Cook

Barber

Milkman Carpenter Nurse

Dentist Lab. technician

(Due to the 1pvp1 .of these students their answers were all about the same (I like my

job because its a good job) .

But they did exhibit a certain amount of basic under-

standing of what those people do.

School #144 -.James Mosher Elementary School .5/11/73 I visited only one class at thin 'school as Mrs. Henderson refused to ritidw an observation. Drugs.

ThCclass was Mrs. Dugger's first grade.

She was having a lesson about

She had the children gathered around her and a table which contained a display

of various drug bottles.'

She began by asking questions regarding drum':

Where do we get drugs?

(the

vocabulary words were pharmacy, drugstore and prescription). What kinds of drugs can you get without a prescription?

With a prescriptinn.? .Why you shouldn't take other

peoples medicine.

There were pictures of health occupations on the board. a book to the group called "How Hospitals Help You". the hospital.

Mrs. Dugger then read

It talked about the workerSin

As she read she asked questions about the people in the book (why do

they do what they-do?)

Then she asked the group questions about doctors, nurses, and pharmacists. (About their duties and responsibilities, training and pay) careers.

They compared thoSe three

As a review they listed things they learned about each on the board:.

The Pharmacist- He makes medicine, He fills prescriptions Tice Doctor- He gives.needles, He gives medicine

The Nurse-. She feeds you4fyou are sick, She takes your temperature Finally they class played a guessing game in which students pantomimed one of the three careers under discussion and the class:guessed who they, were.

There were a few self awareness pittures and self descriptions around the room and some "What I want to be" stories.

APPENDIX C

Elementary Teacher Progress Reports. (Prepared' by Project Staff)

a

PROGRESS REPORTS GIVEN by

PROJECT ELIVENTARY SCHOOL TEACHERS in

BALTIMORE CITY

Occasion of Second Workshop Experience*, January 17, 18, 19 1973

A Component of The Maryland Career Dovelovaent Project Maryland State Department, of Education. -Box 8717, -Friendship international Airp Baltimore, Maryland 212/40 .

.. : ..

CAREER AWARENESS

School #64 1/18/Y3

The following activities have been carried out by the Career Awareness Team and teachers of'schoo1164: - The first staff meeting to aid the team in motivating the staff to participate in a workshep was held on November 6, 1972. Mrs. Allen was present at this meeting to talk with the teachers. - On November 20, 1972 the faculty workshop was, held from 2:40-4:00 with Hrs. Allen in attendance. 4WFhu Purpose of the. Orkshop was: "Workshop participants will be able. to fuse into the existing curriculum a continuum of activities, designed to enable students to develop a positive self-image,orticulate goals for themselves and an awareness of the divcrsity_of occupatione-in'which peeple,engage." **This workShop included an activity work. session in which teachers.. at Various grade levels worked in, various subject areas to fuse career education concepts-into the accepted objectives for each .area. Folders were. distributedtthat contained all the materialsreceived at the workshop held at Lake Clifton and a suggested'or sample unit on the .Field of work was.also included. .

.

A Professional book was purchased by: the school for the faculty's, use as a reference: Career Education, What It Is and How To Do It, by Hoyt, Evans, Mackin, Manzum.

Mrs. Doris Collins (Grade 5) invited Mr. Bo;) Cheeks, Director of Hanpower Resources in the Mayor's office' to talk with the children

-.Mrs. Carole Harris invited Mr. Tommy Harris, a salesman at Fox Chevrolet (Security Blvd.) to talk with the children about his job. - Impressive bulletin hoards have been created in the following rooms: Mrs. Heard, Mrs. Mattison, Mrs. Collins, Mrs. Harris, Mrs. Westmoreland, and Mrs. Byers.

- Mr. Randall Kruj music teacher, has taken students to Morgan State College to hear a recital, visited with studentsland discussed career opportunities related to music. Aehas also taken students.to the Lyric and to Peabody. - Mrs. Myers, art teacher,.has worked with Mrs. Byers' -class on "What Be?" (cut and paste) Will - Letters weretsent home to parents concerning the jobs they have.. .The response was,great. .

Submitted by: Loretta Byers, Chairman Margaret Beard Folic idoll Mattison Gayle Westmoreland rGertrude Faber, CurriCulum,Coordinator

CA1U

lii'DOCATION AT SCHOOL #35

As a follow-up to the-October Workshop, a. Professional Study faculUy meeting was held on the Monday in November. Mrs. Audrey Allen explained the purposes and objectives of Careerl;ducation. A brief report was given by one of the participants about our activitiee during the workshop. Two other participants shared aCtivitAes which they,had done with their pupils during the past school year.

It was suggested that a meeting be held with the grade level chairmen and tho exactpr'odedure for incorporating the career education concept into the curriculum would be explained by Mrs, Allen and the school team.. As an outgrowth of this meeting, grade level meetings were-Scheduled. The teachers on each grade level were released from their classes and mini-workshops, were. sot up. During these workshop sessions, the teachers wrote careen education. activities for all areas of the curriculum. Although many programs are-being initiated in the school this year, a number of innovative, creative activities involving career education are being executed.

.

1. 2. 3.

4. 5. 6. 7. 0. 9. ,

Children have made individual booklets on jobs. Constructed a job learning 'station. Sent. Wo letters to parents about their jobs. Child.ren have filled out an application for job form. 1.dr)ted rcat3ons for. work.

Compiled. a vocabulary of job terms and their meanings. Did an .actual. ;:sscmbly line task for the/ school secretary. One GroulThas written up the workers they read about in their reader. One nronp ha;; listed the traits of two great men from their reader (Behjailjn Banniker). Dr. King).

10. 11.

.12.

!

Made toeiogrtuns about themselves. Discusscd and analyzed the concept 'theme. Had children bring in materials related to their parents jobs.

.

The Music Department, of //35 organized a .choir. It vas decided to have unifom;; for the choir. Material vas bought. The hth grade teacher who la a goodrwamsLress anaisted the choir members in cutting out and making their sldrts. Cho 6th grade Cm° teqp.her taught measurement) which enabled the children td measure their material. :r

As a follow up to new arithmetic skills.

CAREER EDUCATION School #22.

Activity:

Employment Office

Objectiive;,:

3.

TO screen applicants for Various classroom jobs. To hire and fire according to job record. To evaluate employees I work.

h.

To, post weekly the job schedule.'

1. 2.

Procedure: 1.

The teacher hires four responsible children to act as employment officers.

2. 'The teacher runs off duplicated. copies of application forms. Children who are interested in the job will apply.. and be interviewed.

Employment officers keep a record of who is hired weekly or monthly on a record sheet which has been run off by the teacher. 5.

Employment officers post the schedule weekly.

6,

They give some kind of evaluation mark for each employee at the end of each week. They keep this record in a folder.

7.

They discuss with employees their progress or lack of it.

8.

The teacher keeps a check on the employMent officers and evaluates them.

Materials:

Folders, duplicated sheets of applications, duplicated sheets'of Weekly Work Schedule. 4

CAREER EDUCATION ACTIVITIES 1.

In the .process of making a survey of the business in our local school community so that they maybe an'important part of our resource 'file on careers.

2.

Mrs. Allen spoke to our faCulty as a total group On the. important concepts of, career education. We plan to follow this meeting with mini-workshops for any, interested members of the faculty.

.

CAREER EDUCATION

3.

School #22

We nre'maintnining a parent resource file through the use of the letters sent home.. Also we are planning a tea for the parents to speak with.them about the vital role they can play in career. education.

14.

Some of. our pupils have been interviewingdifferont workers withio. the school building. This involves preparing questions).the inter v :;.ctiw itself, and reporting back to the class. The tape recorder has been a valuable aid with the. interviews.

5.

Another activity - some of our Lath and 6th grade pupils are participating in the Dental Assistant Program. During Dental Health Week, these boys and girls will be dental assistants working with early admissions, kindergarten, and first graders. This program is being conducted by Dr. Balise of the Community Pediatrics Center on Redwood Street. One of our pupils will represent our school on a television program on WMAR Television at 1130 EH on Sunday) Jan-uary 22, 1973.

CAHEER/EDUOATIOH ACTIVITY SHEET School. #132

Melvino Byrd 011ie Smith

The'members of our team at School #132 are trying to help pupils develop a positive self- concept and a greater degree, of self-Understanding. We approached this objective .through the new Social Studies Program centered around the theme - "Who AM Group Behaviour - Individuality and Conformity." ..

We used these sample, questions, "\Thati do I know.about'myself?" and "Do I look like other boys or girls?", to begin an underdtanding of each individual' s appearance,physical and racial group. Pupils used mirrors to describe their reflections' and draw self-portraits.. We were,able to write two sentence's-about appearance 'and racial background. We discussed :feelings about .self (happy., sad, angry, excited, etc.),,abilitics of onelsself (What I can do best, ,hat 'I cannot do well,anOlhings I would like to do).' Each pupil made an individual boo let entitled "A54-See Hyseifn which contained drawingd and sentences about one's self.

Pupils discussed the role.of each member of the family - how we felt-about each member, how each member reacted in times of ,anger, worry', happiness, sadness and feelings of excitement. We started a family album in the class and plan to add additional pictures throughout the school year.

We have a lot of role playing in the cl'assroom concerning the feelings of pupils in our class, feelings of family members in specificsituations and ways we can improve or eliminate specific feelings. Pictures from magazines, booklets and pictures from AV Center were assembled on the bulletin, board and 'charts describing or showing feelings for others. Pupils read stories about different feelings and dramatize some of these stories.' We allowed the pupils to investigate.manybOoks to find out the adults' responsibilitieslin the home and the childrensl responsibilltips in the home: We also used the inquiry approach in which pupils divided into groups to discuss and report on ways families. help their Members. Wa used` the film, The Blue Dashiki' to develop the understanding that you can earn money by doing work for others in the community to obtain the materiaIthings you desire. yb discussed the types of work young children can do in the immediate neighborhood to secure small items for themselves or family members.' We: ,made a survey'Of.the types of businessps in' our school community and the skills needed to work in the 'grocery store, gas station,_ and delivering -papers:after school. We are planning to visit many stored and businesses within our school:neighborhood to become acquainted with the World of work.

CAREER EDUCATION

Grade 6 School #60 Maycos Craig 1. .SOliCit jobs from office for class to do as learning activities.

.

1

2.

Extend the idea of making or filling out applications for all school jobs where necessary (poSsible)..

3.

Set up representative's for city jobs - make up a Constitution which will include duties and. salaries..

Z.

Tcaeh the skill of filling out applications, to all boysand.girls.

.5.

Interviews on .tape Which can.bc shared with many classes rather than calling in the people. .

... Isolate jobs in a particular industry.

Pupils select a job they would like and do extensive research on their owri through guidance -at the end of research let pupil decide .if he or she (still) feels that they possess the qualifications needed for the job, Or if they still want the job,. .

On- the - -spot interviews

for pupils, on various jobs in areas close to them.

ACTIVITIES RELATED TJ CAREER AWARENESS Class began a concentrated .unit entitled "Choosing a Career" in September of 1972. ,Each pupil selected a job of his interest.. Jobs were listed on a 'board and each pupiold what he know, if anything about his choice. Extensive research grew out of this which:led to role playing, writing experiences, and other related activities. A.

Learning station titled "Speak Out" - Each pupil wrote three quostionS'On his concerns of any job.Class could at spare time or assigned time'choose one question to which he could answer intelligently,..fran knowledge, in a good paragraph or he could do research on a particular question of ter est.

his. in

B.

A big Thanksgiving dinner was held in which pupils were, 'made aware of the various jobs involved. Mathematics was brought in under the job of the cook in the preparation of food. Other job-areas were the waiters, waitresses, menu makers, etc. (buying materials and food needed).

C.

Bulletin board was plannedand 'developed by pupils which changed.constantly:with pictures and reports. on job opportunities as well as job interests, meaning jobs, not commonly known to pupils.

EtrkICAVION

Grade 6 School #60 Mayeos Craig 1

P.

:;ongs were learned which related. tocarcer development and somc original songs to fwniliar tunes were written.

E.

Pictures were collected from magazines and newspaper illustrating various jobs From this, pupilu. wrote original stories using factual'infonnation discovered or learned.

F.

Fran the gathering of information, an original play woo written which will be "put on" as a school program to encourage similar activities related to careers throughout the entire school.

i

I

School #103

CAREER EDUCATION, ACTIVITIES

Faculty Viewed film from Maryland State Department - worked on a team to incoivorate CE concepts Thto Science, Social Studies.

Parents 1.

Introduced idea in a parent's meeting:,

2.

Sent letters by the School-Homelifaison Worker; S HLW contacted Model CitieS as to ways they can be a resource.

3...

Began a file of occupations.

Children - Rode to.Zoo.

Walked to fire, station, Lafayette Market, Took pictures Bought and. made. Jello to list work involved.

Viewed Nin "The Dairy Farmer". Listened to zoo worker,. member of Daltimore Zoological Society. Listed careers related to animals. 'Talked to Officer Joe, Officer Friendly, nurse, teacher's aide. Listed after,z. school work - emptying trash, wash dishes, etc.

School /73.41

1.

A visit Lo a dental laboratory was ,ma0e). Students became aware of ,jobs The tools :in tho ri(Ad of deptiOxy. They uaw an impresSion being made. the technician uSed were explained. The techniciandescribed his duties and talked about other ;jobs in his field.

2.

Joseph Burris visited a class to talk about his hobby which was wood carving. He showed, the tools he used and he demonstrated how. to make objects from wood. He also talked about.how a hobby can sometimes become one life work. A class toured the city to obserVe the different factories and industries. Pupils observed construction going on.

4.

Intermediate gradesllave inVolved%Career Allareness in. the science-Units "The Solar System" 'and "The Earth Inside and Out" Careers mentioned were *geologists' *geographers *oceanographers' *astronauts *chemists *technicians (many kinds)

*The discussion centered 'around the relationship of their work to the environment. 5.

The center of interest, in an intermediate.language arts program was "Writing Longer Reports" about careers ast teachers merchants salesmen musicians astronaut6.-'preparing food for the dietitians. astronauts

6.

Librarian'. stresses careers when teaching biographies. how they arrived at their final achieVement in life.

She stresses also

M.L. Bugger School #11413

Activities engaged in by grades one through three 1.

Worn children fill in application for classroom jobs. Emphasizing, with children, importance of being able to fill out applications.

2.

Use real objects or pictures of- tools associated with specific jobs, such an: menu-waiters, letter - postman,

3.

Discuss the baby sitter. Play role of baby sitter. Use poem "Our baby sitter" Learning Time Through Language Experiences 1Louise Bender Scott

4.

Discuss the meter` reader, use poem "The Meter Reader ", above reference

5.

Teach or read poems from February, 1970, issue of Instructor "EVeryone Great" "Occupation Builder", "T.V. Repairman" "Fruit Picker" "The Conjuror" and others.

6.

List parents' occupations. these occupations.

Have Children illustrate and write stories about

Possible activities 1.

Collect, library-books for young children A 110.71t for Peppn"

Leo Palito - Martin

renTrii-r,TeTinfo BUsiness

Country Curie, 1:

(;c'on'e T: kcs A Job - H. A. Rey

Plat Thov ho AlfDat - Pruner - Zio4 dThekm4kor'-.Ardizzono

Johnny Nike ;:ullig:in and jis Stem Shovel - Burton liondreska Sfiii;por John's C'ook - Brown

_

Fi nd h ,av - Behrens _______

.i!lherman - :'rows

SitCer - Zion tlie Up 1
2.

Develop the'iden of what's behind a quart of milk or how food gets from the farm to the table.

3.

Develop a bulletin board using pictures of occupations that influoRco our live;::.

1,.

Role playing in priMary city, build various stores, homes, etc.

0. Make hail, Play roles of various workers. Discuss shapes of hats and their significance in the job. ;

6.

Economics:

Discuss supply and demand , income) division of labor) etc.

School #103 CAREER EDUCATION ACTIVITIES With teachers:

Talked about the scope of Career Education

Viewedthe film

_

.

Worked in teams to incoporate C.E. concepts in Science units. With parents: Introduced the idea of Career Edudation Utilized the Pare-oWAAsOnWorker to begin a file of careers represented by euraarents, to tap communitYresources, and to explore relatie6 of the .staff. .

With Children:

Grades Kgn.. 1 and 2 Discussed Meaning of 'Work Talked about father's work Toured School and .9611001 neighborhood noting workers (construction workers, crossing guard, store. managers, 'etc). Visited fire department during Fire Protection Week, and learned of varied jobs including the chief's. u ac

Toured Lafayette Market to make purchases for a party (Halloween) and to photograph workers on their jobs. Noted businesses on the avenue. (One is owned by a classmate's grandmother.) Discussed work of policemen and.compared their jobs te the'special job of Officer Friendly. Researched careers related to animals using pictures) books, films and intervieW6Mr. Deal], of 'Baltimore Zoological Society Will be in on 12/20) Visited the zoo to view animals and animal-related careers. Saw the film "The Diary Farmer" and discussed work related to animals. 41

+I

Career Education Activities

Urado 6 School 103

I Pup3

11::ted deflations of work. Wrote synonyms on tagboard and make bulletin boards shoving definitions and various types of work.

II

Pupils viewed film strips and movies of work done by policeman and firemen. USed role playing.to point out some of the things a policeman or fireman,. has to do.

III Talked. with Mr. Martin of the Fire Department and learned about duties of a fire inspector as well as regUlar fireman. IV

V

Pupils listed occupations they are interested in. Wrote letters to get information from government about those occupations. Received pamphlets and follow-up letters about occupations. Wrote letters to set up interviews, with school personnel - janitor, nurse, school secretary) librarion2.teacher, principal, teacher's aide, dietitian. .

Pupils in:tde list of questions to ask during interviews:.

VI

Pupils shared tapes with first grade class:and answered questions.

VII

Pupils Made a booklet which includes pictitre and outline of .jobs i thoy are interested in. .Ghtlino included: I.

II.

III. IV.

Job Duties Working Conditions Training Related Jobs

APPENDIX D

Instruments Used in the Evaluation' v

1. 2.

3.

4. 6.'

Self-awareness Primary Self-awareness Intermediate Self-awareness Teacher form Career-awareness - Primary Career-awareness - Intermediate Employers' Rating Card

WO0

Some of the brief instruments usedto survey workshop.attendees are .

included in, the text and 'are not repeated here.

.

1/4/73 1.

Self-awareness - PriMary

INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE TEACHER

The accompanying materials are part of an assessment of the "self- -

awareness" of your students in connection with the ongoing Maryland'

Career DevelopmentProIeCt.

The Instrument is to be given on the date

indieated'hy your Administrator. There are two parts to this instrument.

Part one is a self-

awareness exercise to be answered by the students about themselves.

On the second (teacher part we are asking you to give your impressions of the stndents.on the same dimensions.

The variable to be measured is

the difference between the two sets of responses.

We wish to emphasize

that this information will never be used against the child in any way will not be apart of his permanent record! ; and indeed will never be reported by name.

The only point of interest is how accurately. he (

pictures himself as compared to the obserVations of others.

Does he see

himself in the same way that others (in this case, you) see him. Thus,

your responses about the students must be done without the

knowledge of the answers givenby the students. It is important that you-emphasize to the students that this is not a test e.nd that there are no right or wrong answers.

What matters is

that'they try their best to give their true impressions about themselves. Also,,all papers must. have the students' names clearly written so that

a comparison of the two sets of responses can be made. The instructions for the actual administration are on the following page.

It may be necessary to go overthese'instructions with theclass

several times until. you are certain that the direction's are-understood'..

The student response sheets and your response sheets will be collected from you at a time to be announced to you by'your:AdminiStrator.

TBANK'YOU FOR YOUR COOPERATION.

INSTRUCTIONS TOR THE TEACHER

The accompanying materials are, part of an assessment of the "careerawareness" of your Students in connection with the ongoing Maryland. Career Development Project,

The Instrument i

to be given on the date indicated by

your AdminisLrator.

This is a career-awareness exercise to be answered by. the students It is important that yoU emphasize to the students that while there may not

appear to be completely right or wrong answers that what mattersis that they give the best answers ,they can based on their impressions about the workers.

Also, all papers must have the students' names clearly written, of papers should be clearly labeled with the'teachers

Each gtoUp

name.

It maybe necessary to go over these instructions'with-the class several times'until you are certain that the directions are, understood..

The student response sheets will be collected from.you.at;a time be announced to you by your Administrator. The instructions for the actual administration follow:

.

THANK YOU FOR YOUR .COOPERATION.

Self-Aworenes Primary:

I am going to give you two, Boys and Girls, we are going tp.piny n cho.osing game. words, and you are going to choose which word tells how you feel about yourself. You Loeik at This .mark an X on your sheet on the ladder to show how well the words fit you. Young/Old and Illustrates at board for 3 conditions) example on the board - Teacher uses You are to make the bottom is vet), old. The boy on the top is very young, the, person on, here: you are very young yoU might make a mark a mark where .you are'-

If you are not very young but not very old you might put a mark here:

If .you were very old you might pit a mark here:

Answer questLoos.

Now take on this). You At the "Big ". you are - what done correctly

your pink sheet and look at the top of the page - hold up the aheet (check see two figures with a, ladder in between. At the top of the ladder is Mark an.X to show Where bottom is "Little ". Where are you on the ladder? (Check,around room to see if between "Big" and "Little"? rung are you on )

Now look at the bottoM part of the pink sheet - here is another' ladder.: The .top are yoU on this ladder? of this ladder is "Quiet" and the bottom is "Noisy ".' or, "Noisy", Puti on the'rung that, Mark an .X to show how close yoU are to Dhows how you think abciut yourself. (RepeAt for other bipolar scales.

a

-

WORD PAIRS TO BE READ TO THE CLASS

ABOUT YOURSELF:, 1.

Big I. Little

Quiet / 3.

Sick. / Well

4.

Sad / Happy

5:

Good / Bad

6.

Friendly / Unfriendly.

7.

Right / Wrong

8.

Pay Attention / Not pay attention

DO YOU DO THINGS: 9.

By yourself / With others

10. Outdoors / Indoors

11. That are easy / That arehard 12. Well in school / Not well in school

4Nrm

7

Grades 4-6 2,

ALL. ABOUT YOU

How do you think about yourself? Words can be used to tell how you think about On each of the lines below put a mark to show how the words tell about you, yourself. If.you are more like the word on the left, put your mark in one of Think lbout If yon are more like the word on the right, put your mark 01' left. If you are exactly in between, put your mark in the middle box. c,:ne of tiusv boxes. The better the word tells about you, the closer to it your mark should be. Make only one mark on a line. Make a mark on every line.. This is NOT a test.

There are NO RIGHT ANSWERS.

Just make the boxes the way you

thin-k or fevi.

EXAMPLE

think about YOUNG/OLD.

For example, mark like thin:

If you are very old, you would make a

OLD

YOUNG

If you arc.not young but not old, you would mark like this:

/

/

/

X

/

/

/

OLD

YOUNG

If you are young but not very young, you would mark like this:

YOUNG

OLD

START hERE 1.

/

FAST

2.

/

BIG

3.

LITTLE

/

STRONG

4.

SLOW

WEAK

/

QUIET

NOISY

Emp 1. oyur

Rrt lug 'City d

SPECIAL CURRICULUM AND GENERAL ,VOCATIONAL SCHOOL Personal "non s

Skills (Ind Work, l'hihits. Super i or

Good

fair

&Motor Gotxt

Poor

)'`

Appearance

Ability to follow directions Aciafrocy Arithmetic Commimicotion Cooperotion Generol aptitude

Attitude

Neatness fieoclino

Initiative Interest In work leodership Meeting people

1.(s

.....

Courtesy

Emotional

stability

Gett ing ()tong

with others

lie%ponsibility

y.

Quontity of work Quolity of work

Personal Hygiene

Reliability Respect for

authority

.

General Rating

Generof P.otino

.

r

°unctuolity

Employee%

Attendance .

.3

bte -

"11' I

Cprnnents.

/21-'6

'if5 ,j)

tS

.1,2'rt://) _

.

.

/%./

roir

c")?,f

6.

349 91 0045

(Continued)

Baltimore City Public Schools Division of Guidance and Placement JOB- ORIENTED PROGRAMS

Student School Employed Addt ess.

Employed from

Typo of Business

19

/ ) /P. /."

Typical Tasks Performed

.'/..)-/f-7-,

Ptif. To the EMPLOYER: Please check your reocflons on the reverse side.

19

:;'

1

What People Do

For each of the jobs on the top of the next page think about the descriptton down the side.

If the description' fits MOST OF THE TIME or

for MOST PEOPLE in that job, put an "X" in the space opposite the description and under,that job:

each description in turn.

Work first with the first job, and think about

If it.fits most peopld in that job or fits

'-people in that:. job No§t of the time,. put the "X" in the space. 40

many descriptions for.a4Aoh as you think fit. and do the same thing.

Mark-as

Then go on to the next job

.

..

.

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Cacer-nwarenoss - Primary

Teacher Instructions - Primary:

,.:Arvor

Boyn JIEW Girls, we are going to play a game called "What people do".

*Athe net of papers in front of you. rf '1(4:Irrutt 4

through.

..orkers,

Lodk

You will see that there are eight pictures

These eight workers will be a part of the game all. the way

Let's look at them together to be sure.we know who they are

...

(Teacher

introduces earh of the pictures and discusses them until she is certain they are clear and recognizable to all.) which denerthos certain workers.

At the top of each set of pictures is a n.mtence I will read each sentence and then

which of the workers that the sentence fits. most of the time.)

tjld of wort L

will decide

(By fits, I mean fits most of that

It may fit only one or more than one worker.

Put a big X over those. workers the sentence fiti.

Let's look at the example on the first page.

outdoors mot of the time.

The sentence says - I work

Where would you put an X - who works outdoors most

r would say that the truck .driver and the athlete and the construc-

of the ti;:w:

tion worker are the ones who do most of their work outdoors.

The nurse works in

a hospital, tbe.teacher in a school, the clerk in a store, the musician on a stage nnr1 the 11,;:(!h.1,,c in a garage.

Now if yi did not put an X through "athlete", I can understand why,

There

in a picture of a basketball player there and he does play basketball indoors 'Jut remember what I said - we want you to think about all athletes of all kinds. NoW wouldn't you say that most athletes workout -of- doors?

I think so.

I want

Ilml to think .,Tout all ,of the workers' and give, the answers which seem best to you,

'Acre is a sentence at the top and bottom of each of the pages in the booklet in We will look at each sentence one by one beginning with the pink

front of'you. rine.

Lets turn to the pink page and begin.,

_

.

Png' 2

SICK

6.

WELL

I.

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BEAUTIFUL

a

7.

s\ /

UGLY

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SAD

HAPPY

8.

/

GOOD

9.

BAD,,

/

KIND

lo.

UNKIND

/

rRIENuu

UNFRIENDLY

CALM

12.

EXCITED

/

AFRAID

13.

UNAFRAID

/

/

LATE

14.

/

BUSY

RESTING ..

1 15. DEFENDABLE

:.. NOT DEPENDABLE

Hi

/

V

17.

WRONG

i

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DO WELL IN SCHOOL

ott-8..

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/

RIGHT

I.

I PAY ATTENTION

/

DONT'T DO WELL IN SCHOOL

/

DONIT PAY -ATTENTION

t

.

ALL ABOUT THE THINGS YOU DO

Now think about the things you like to do. Put a mark on each of the lines hclow to toll Mont the thing!: yon like to do. If the words on the left de!.,:r[be the, If the words on things you iiho to di, put a mark in one of the boxes to the left. toll !,etter about the things you do, put the mark in one of the boxes on the the tii;ht The better the eoctly in between, put your mark in the middle box. it 1 :(-d,; tell about the things you like to do, the closer to them your mark should be. Make only one mark on a line. Make a mnrk on every. line.

.

19.

/

BY MYSLIF

WITH OTHERS

S 20.

/

OUTDOOW;

2t.

INDOORS

/

DIRTY

22.

/

WATCHED

UNWATCHED

23.

SAFE

24.

/

EA:;Y

25.

DANGEROUS

HARD

/

THINKING

DOING