ERIC ED105746: Caribou Bilingual Project. Final Evaluation Report, 1973-1974

DOCUMENT RESUME ED 105 746 AUTHOR TITLE INSTITUTION SPONS AGENCY PUB DATE NOTE EDRS PRICE DESCRIPTORS IDENTIFIERS 95 FL 006 799 Cox, Lorraine Ca...

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DOCUMENT RESUME ED 105 746 AUTHOR TITLE

INSTITUTION SPONS AGENCY PUB DATE NOTE EDRS PRICE DESCRIPTORS

IDENTIFIERS

95

FL 006 799

Cox, Lorraine Caribou Bilingual Project. Final Evaluation Report, 1973-1974. Caribou School Dept:, Maine. Office of Education (DHEW), Washington, D.C. Jul 74 111p.

MF-$0.76 HC-$5.70 PLUS POSTAGE *Bilingual Education; *Bilingual Schools; Curriculum Evaluation; Early Childhood Education; Elementary Education; English (Second Language); *French; *Language Programs; *Program Evaluation; Second Language Learning Elementary Secondary Education Act Title VII; ESEA Title VII

ABSTRACT

This is an evaluative report on the Caribou Exemplary Bilingual Project for 1973-1974, its second year. The English-French program involved two kindergarten, two first grade, and two second grade classes. The report includes a description of the project, a discussion of the procedures used to evaluate it, an assessment of each of the five project components: instructional, staff development, community involvement, materials development, and management; and a section on summaries and recommendations. A major conclusion is that the program students performed as well as comparison nonprogram classes, and that therefore skill acquisition was not harmed by the program. An appendix deals with students who received special services for behavioral and/or academic problems. (Author/AM)

1

-V

r

CARIBOU BILINGUAL PROJECT FINAL EVALUATION REPORT 1973-1974

CARIBOU PUBLIC SCHOOLS

OF FFEALTH

!

LORRAINE COX EVALUATOR 02/3

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

. INTRODUCTION

1

DESCRIPTION OF THE PROGRAM

1

EVALUATION PROCEDURES

2

INSTRUCTIONAL COMPONENT

4

4

Introduction

4

Results of Standardized Tests Evaluation of Product Objectives Evaluation of Process Objectives

32

45 55

STAFF DEVELOPMENT COMPONENT

55 61

Description of Activities Evaluation of Objectives .

67

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT COMPONENT

67 69

Description of Activities Evaluation of Objectives

76

MATERIALS DEVELOPMENT COMPONENT

76 77

Description of Activities Evaluation of Objectives

80

MANAGEMENT COMPONENT

80 83

Description of Activities Management Schedule

85

SUMMARIES AND RECOMMENDATIONS

85 87 88 90 92

Instructional Component Staff Development Component Community Development Component Materials Development Component Management Component APPENDIX:

Reports Abcut Students Who Received Special 93

Services

04

1

INTRODUCTION

This report presents the evaluation of the Caribou Exemplary Bilingual Project. 1973-1974 was the second operational year for this program, which was funded by the Office of Education through E.S .E.A. Title VII. The evaluation covers the period from September, 1973 through June, 1974.

This report includes a description of the Caribou Title VII Project, a discussion of the procedures used to evaluate it, and assessment of each of the five Instructional, Staff Development, Community Involvement, project components Materials Development, and Management; summaries and recommendations for each component reflect the accomplishments of the 1973-1974 project and its direction for 1974-1975. The report also includes an Appendix, which presents anecdotal reports about the Special Services received by some of the program students; the diagnosis, prescription, implementation, and evaluation are described.

Mrs. Lorraine Cox served as the evaluator of the project. Technical assistance and consultation about the evaluation were provided by Dr. Robert Consalvo and Mrs . Judy Gordon of Heuristics , Inc.

DESCRIPTION OF PROGRAM

Caribou, a small rural city in northern Maine, is located in close proximity to Canada and "the St . John Valley , where a high concentration or French-

Canadians first settled. According to an October, 1971 survey, Caribou's school system has 1,458 French-American students in its total enrollment of 3,465, thus representing 42.08% of the total school population. A needs assessment for the target group was conducted, and revealed that these students' educational needs were not being met. Thus the Caribou Exemplary Bilingual Program was funded, and began to operate in September of the 1972-1973 school year. The program involved two kindergarten and two first grade classes with a total enrollment of 97 students. This year (1973-1974), the program added two second grade classes (45 students) , giving a total of 144 students in the six classes . These classes are located in the Teague Park and Sincock Elementary Schools of Caribou, Maine.

05

2

During the second year of operation, non-instructional activities focused on staff development of the second grade teachers , reinforcement of inclividualizod instructional procedures , implementation of satisfactory teaching techniques and methods , revision of instructional objectives , development of a French curriculum , an art curriculum , instructional materials , and units of instruction for the bilingual classrooms , organization of information about the cultural heritage of area students , and formulation of objectives for the non-instructional components . The program was staffed by a Project Director, Evaluator/Curriculum Coordinator, five teachers (the kindergarten classes were each one-half day) , five aides, and one secretary . The five teachers were locally supported; the remaining staff was supported from the Title VII Program budget.

In-service instruction was provided for the program staff to increase their professional competence in a variety of instruction-related skills, and focused primarily, on the second grade teachers. The Caribou Advisory Council met regularly and involved parents and the community in their activities during the year. The cooperative program with the University of Maine at Presque Isle continued the development and implementation of audio-visual materials for use in facilitating language acquisition by the students . Additional information about project activities can be found in this evaluation report and in the project files .

EVALUATION PROCEDURES

The evaluation of the Caribou Exemplary Bilingual Program was conducted by Mrs. Lorraine Cox , with Dr. Robert Consalvo and Mrs. Judy Gordon of Heuristics , Inc. as consultants. Mrs. Cox was responsible for on-site evaluation of the program; under her supervision or with her assistance the following activities were implemented by the project staff: 1.

Administration and scoring of the following tests to assess students' cognitive achievement: Metropolitan Achievement Test, French Version of Metropolitan Achievement Test, Cooperative Preschool Inventory in English and French, English Oral Production Test, French version of Comprehension of Oral Language Test , and the Pupil Behavior Inventory;

2.

Completion of product, process and materials usage checklists by program teachers;

0

3

3.

Verification of product checklists by retesting of program students on objectives;

4.

Periodic observation of program classes;

5.

Construction of written questionnaires to assess in-service workshops;

6..

Periodic feedback about the status of instructional objectives based on tabulation of checklists' responses;

7.

Conducting of informal discussions with program teachers about program operation;

8.

Administration of parent questionnaire in the fall of 1973;

9.

Preparation of Interim Evaluation Report;

10.

Preparation of evaluation design for Continuation Proposal;

11.

Preparation of Final Evaluation Report.

Heuristics, Inc. was responsible for insuring the appropriate evaluation of the project and for providing technical assistance to the evaluator. Heuristics, Inc. performed the following activities: 1.

Development of the testing program for the second grade classes;

2.

Analysis of data;

3.

Review of all reports prepared for the project;

4.

Editing and printing of Final Evaluation Report.

.4_

INSTRUCTIONAL COMPONENT

Introduction

Assessment of the Instructional Component continued to be the primary focus of the evaluation of the 1973-1974 project. The overall achievement of the students, as well as the program's accomplishment of its product and process objectives, were measured. A series of achievement tests was administered to assess the skill acquisition of program students in their first language (in a variety of content areas), in their second language , and in social-emotional development. The teachers also rated their students' performance of the product objectives developed by the teachers and the evaluator. Verification of the accuracy of the teacher's assessment of the product and process objectives was performed by the on-site evaluator. The data for the Instructional Component, then, are presented in three sections: 1) Results of Standardized Tests, 2) Evaluation of Product Objectives, and 3) Evaluation of Process Objectives.

Results of Standardized Tests Program students were pre-tested in August and September, 1973 and posttested in May , 1974 with a variety of tests designed to measure their acquisition of skills in the following areas: reading in first language and second language (English or French), mathematics in first language and second language, content area skills in English, oral skills in second language, and social-emotional development. Table 1 lists the tests administered , the skill area assessed , and the group of program students who completed each test. With the exception of the Metropolitan Achievement Test--Primer level, which was administered to kindergarten program students only at the end of the school year , the tests in Table 1 were administered as pre and post-tests. For the first time, this year the Test of Basic Experiences (TOBE) was administered to the kindergarten and grade 1 classes as pre and post-tests of content area skills in language, mathematics science, and social studies. In addition to program students , non-program classes at the Hilltop were administered the Cooperative Preschool Inventory (kindergarten) and the Metropolitan Achievement Test was administered to nonprogram students at Sincock and Teague Park Schools (Grades 1 and 2) . A detailed description of the educational progress made by program students with emotional problems who received special services from the Crisis InterventionPrevention Specialist is presented in Appendix A of this report, where an anecdotal record for each student is included.

08

Reading/

Metropolitan Achieve-

Metropolitan Achievement Test

Version)

ment Test (French

Metropolitan Achieve-

Second Language

English as a

Mathematics

French Reading/

Mathematics

Readiness

Cooperative Preschool Inventory (French Version)

ment Test

Readiness

Skill Area

Cooperative Preschool Inventory (English Version)

Test Name

X

English

X

French

Kindergarten

Test Administered

Table 1

X

English

X

X

French

Grade 1

Group Tested

X

English

-2;

X

X

French

Grade 2

c.n

Mathematics Language Science

Tests of Basic Experiences Social Studies

Social-Emotional Development

Pupil Behavior Inventory

(TOBE)

Second Language

English as a

Second Language

French as a

Second Language

French as a

Skill Area

English Oral Production Test

Version)

Test (French

Comprehension of Oral Language

Version)

ment Test (French

Metropolitan Achieve-

Test Name

x

X

English

French

Kindergarten

Table 1 (Cont.)

x

X

X

X

English

X

French

Grade 1

Group Tested

X

X

English

X

French

Grade 2

0)

7

First Language Skills: ,

Reading and Mathematics

Kindergarten Cooperative Preschool Inventory . Kindergarten students were administered this test in their native language to assess their acquisition of readiness skills, especially in reading and mathematics. This 64-item inventory is described by the publisher as "a brief assessment and screening procedure designed for use with children in the age range of three to six years, developed to give a measure of achievement in areas regarded as necessary for success in school." It has four subtests , described in the manual as follows: 1.

Personal-Social Respor.siveness: Knowledge about the child's own personal world and his ability to get along with and respond to the communications of another person.

2.

Associative Vocabulary: Ability to demonstrate awareness of the connotation of a word by carrying out some action or by associating to certain intrinsic qualities of the underlying verbal concept.

3.

Concept Activation-Numerical: Ability to label quantities , to make judgments of more or less , to recognize seriated positions.

4.

Concept Activation-Sensory: To be aware of certain sensory attributes (shapes, size, motion, color) and to execute certain visual-motor configurations.

Table 2 reports the t-test for correlated data used to compare pre and post-test scores. Kindergarten students demonstrated a statistically significant increase in the skills assessed by the Cooperative Preschool Inventory . Also noteworthy is the comparable performance of program and non-program students. These data suggest that the kindergarten program classes have accomplished the program's goal of achieving scores which are comparable to the scores of non-program classes; at the kindergarten level, program participation does not seem to be delaying the students' acquisition of the skills measured by the test.

8

Table 2

Performance of Program and Non-Program Kindergarten Students on the Cooperative Preschool Inventory

Group

Post

Pre

N

t

pc

X

SD

X

SD

31

44.91 51.65

7.18 6.89

55.18 58.58

5.27 3.85

5.65 7.17

.001 .001

73

49.56

8.32

54.44

5.57

10.29

.001

tti

Program Students French Dominant English Dominant

11

Non-Program Students

Class A and B

Metropolitan Achievement Test. This year for the first time, the Primer level of the Metropolitan Achievement Test was administered to the Kindergarten classes as a post-test only , to determine to what extent the kindergarten students had developed the prerequisite skills for first grade instruction. This test provides a quick, convenient, and dependable basis for early classification of students according to the success they will experience in first grade. It does not directly measure the effectiveness of the kindergarten program, although it is reasonable to assume that a good kindergarten program should contribute to the development of many of the skills measured by the test. The Metropolitan Achievement Test assesses the students' abilities in reading and mathematics. For the Listening for Sounds subtest, the student marks the word read or described by the tester; this subtest assesses the students' skills in discrimination, analysis , and identification of beginning, middle, and ending sounds. Only the first 28 items of the Reading subtest were administered; these items measure pupils' beginning reading skills . The students must identify letters, and select a word that describes a picture. The Numbers subtest assesses the students' understanding of basic mathematical principles and relationships. The twenty items administered test counting, measurement, numeral recognition, among other

12

skills . The last fourteen items of the subtest, which measure the students' ability to add and subtract one digit numbers, were not administered. Table 3 reports the mean score and standard deviation for each subtest of the Metropolitan, which was administered in English to all students. In the Listening for Sounds subtest, of the 48 students tested, the following letter grades were earned by the percentage of students cited: A-63%, B-15%, C-13%, D-4%, E-8%. In the Reading subtest , the following grades were earned by the percentage of students cited: A-31%, B-23%, C-19%, D-4%, E-23%. In the Numbers subtest, the following grades were earned by the percentage cited: A-6%, B-33%, C-42%, D-19%, E-2%. Since no formal reading instruction was introduced in kindergarten , the reading scores are commendable.

Table 3 Results of Metropolitan Achievement Test Primer Level for Kindergarten Students Administered in May , 1974 (N= 48)

Score

Score Reported

X

SD

Listening for Sounds

Standard Score

34.00

4.97

Reading

Standard Score

29.83

3.68

Numbers

Raw Score

13.81

2.61

Grade 1

Metropolitan Achievement Test. English dominant Grade 1 program and non-program students completed the Metropolitan as a pre-test (Primer level) and post-test (Primary I level) in September, 1973 and May/June, 1974, respectively. The Metropolitan Achievement Test assesses the students' abilities in reading and mathematics . The Primary I level includes four subtests. The Word Knowledge Subtest has 35 items that measure the extent of the students' reading vocabulary . Pupils are given a picture of a common object and must select from four words the one word that describes the picture. The Word Analysis Subtest, which has forty

13

10

items , measures the students' knowledge of sound-letter relationships or skill in decoding. Pupils must identify a dictated word from among several words with similar configurations and sound patterns. The Reading subtest, with forty-two items , assesses the students' comprehension of written material. Thirteen items require pupils to select one of three easy sentences which best describes a picture and twenty-nine items require pupils to read simple paragraphs and answer questions about what they have read. The Mathematics Subtest is divided into two parts: Part A--Concepts has thirty-five items which measure the students' understanding of the basic mathematical principles and relationships by testing knowledge of counting, place value, sets, measurement, etc.; Part B--Computation has twenty-seven items which assess the pupils' ability to add and subtract one and two digit numbers with no regrouping.

The students' performance on each subtest is reflected by the number of correct items . This raw score can then be transformed into a standard score which is used to compare the performance of students on different levels of the Metropolitan Achievement Test. A standard score can then be transformed into a grade equivalent score, which can be used to compare the performance of a student to the performance of typical students at a particular grade level. Table 4 reports the English dominant Grade 1 students' performance on the Metropolitan Achievement Test. The t-tests for correlated data used to compare pre and post-test scores for the four subtests , plus Total Reading, (which is the sum of the students' score on the Word Knowledge and Reading subtests indicate that program students made highly statistically significant gains in their word analysis, reading and mathematics skills. In addition, the post-test grade equivalents of 2.3, 2 .0, 2.0 , 2.2 , and 2.3 in Word Knowledge, Word Analysis, Reading, Total Reading and Total Mathematics respectively, were highly commendable, and show that the program students earned scores above the norm group for their actual grade placement of 1.9.

French Version of Metropolitan Achievement Test. Both the Primer and Primary I levels of the Metropolitan were transformed into French by the project director, and completed as a pre-test (Primer) and post-test (Primary I) by the French dominant program students. Table 5 reports the t-tests for correlated data used to compare pre and post mean standard scores. A review of this table indicates that French dominant program students scored significantly higher on the post-test than on the pre-test for all subtests.

Total Mathematics

Total Reading

Reading

Word Analysis

Word Knowledge

Score

8.00 11.02 10.26 10.82

4.71

3.40 -

7.53

42.26 45.17

45.74 50.43

27.94 -

28.97

10.13

Post

30.34

-

Pre

48.06

Post

SD

-

Pre

SE

Results of Metropolitan Achievement Test for English Dominant Grade 1 Students (N= 35)

Table 4

2.0 2.2 2.3

-

-

2.0

2.3

-

Post

Pre

5G.E.

14.10

-

10.87

12.45

-

t

.001

-

.001

.001

-

p<

12

Table 5

Results of French Version of Metropolitan Achievement Test for French Dominant Grade 1 Students (N= 11)

I

Score

Pre

SD

t Post

Pre

7.49

40,64

Word Knowledge

P

Post

Word Analysis

23.82

35.91

3.93

5.92

7.76

.001

Reading

22.64

39.27

3.96

6.45

8.33

.001

10.13

.001

Total Mathematics

5.72

39.18

Total Reading 19.09

41.55

4.56

7.05

Summary. Table 6 summarizes the performance of the Grade 1 program and non-program students . Comparison of the French dominant students' performance to that of English dominant program and non-program students can only be made tentatively , since transformation of the test into another language most likely affects its difficulty. Comparison of the English dominant program students to the nonprogram students indicates that their performance is quite comparable with scoring slightly higher than the program classes, but the difference is not educationally significant. Grade 2 Metropolitan Achievement Test. The Primary I Level of the Metropolitan was administered in September, 1973 as a pre-test and the Primary II Level in May/June. 1974 as a post-test to the English dominant Grade 2 program students and to all non-program students. A description of the Primary I level is presented above. The Primary II level of the Metropolitan Achievement Test includes seven subtests. The Word Knowledge subtest has forty items which measure the extent of the students' reading vocabulary; seventeen items require the students to select one of

16

Program-French Program-English Non-Program A and B

Reading

Program-French Program-English Non-Program A and B

-7 Word Analysis

i---

Program-French Program-English Non-Program A and B

Word Knowledge

Score/Group

11 35 34

34

11 35

35 34

11

N

22.64 27.94 29.76

23.82 30.34 30.59

-

-

Pre

X

39.27 45.17 45.50

35.91 42.26 43.00

40.64 48.06 50.86

Post

3.96 3.40 5.62

3.93 4.71 8.09

-

-

Pre

SD

6.45 11.02 10.67

5.92 8.00 9.28

7.49 10.13 12.99

Post

2.0 2.1

2.0 2.1

-

-

-

2.3 2.5

Post

-

-

_

Pre

RG.E.

Performance of Program and Non-Program Grade One Students on Metropolitan Achievement Test

Table 6

8.33 10.87 10.44

7.76 12.45 12.07

-

-

t

.001 .001 .001

.001 .001 .001

-

P<

Non-Program A and B

Program- English

Program-French

Total Mathematics

Program-French Program-English Non-Program A and B

Total Reading

Score/Group

11 35 34

34

35

11

N

19.09 28.97 27.35

Pre

X

41.55 50.43 53.21

39.18 45.74 46.35

Post

4.56 7.53 8.20

Pre

SD

Table 6 (Cont.)

7.05 10.82 12.33

10.26 10.58

5.72

Post

Pre

2.3 2.4

2.2

2.2

Post

1TG .E .

10.13 14.10 13.89

_

t

.001 .001

-

P

15

four words that match the stimulus picture; twenty-three items require the students to identify a synonym, antonym or classification of a given word. The Word Analysis subtest contains thirty-five items that assess the pupils' knowledge of sound-letter relationships or skill in decoding; pupils must identify a dictated word from several printed words which have similar configurations or sound patterns . In the fortyfour item Reading subtest, which measures the students' comprehension of written material, thirteen items require the students to select one of three sentences which best describes a given picture; in thirty-one items the students read a paragraph and answer questions about what they have read. The Spelling subtest includes thirty items that measure the pupils' ability to spell commonly used words. The Mathematics Computation subtest has 33 addition , subtraction , multiplication , and division problems . The Mathematics Concepts subtest includes forty items which measure the pupils' understanding of basic mathematical principles such as place value, measurement, laws, etc. The Mathematics Problem Solving subtest, with thirty-five items , assesses the students' ability to apply knowledge in solving numerical problems; approximately one-half of the problems are dictated to the students , and the remaining problems are read by the students for themselves.

Table 7 reports the English dominant Grade 2 students' performance on the Metropolitan Achievement Test. The t-tests for correlated data used to compare the pre and post-test scores for the seven subtests plus the Total Reading Score (which is the sum of the students' score on the Word Knowledge and Reading subtests) and the Total Mathematics Score (which is the sum of the students' score on the Mathematics Computation, Concepts and Problem Solving subtests) suggest that the program students made highly statistically significant gains on all their subtests . Also, on the post-test they earned mean grade equivalent scores between one and four months above the norm group for their actual grade placement of 2.9 on all subtests , except for the Word Analysis and Mathematics Computation subtests , on which they scored at their actual grade placement.

French Version of the Metropolitan Achievement Test. Table 8 reports the French dominant Grade 2 students' performance on the Primary I and Primary II levels of the Metropolitan, which were translated into French by the project director, and administered in September, 1973, and May, 1974, respectively. The students made statistically significant gains from pre to post-test on all scores.

19

1"..,-..

....1

r.......,

2.3 62.32

50.50

10.02

61.93

-

Mathematics Problem Solving

Total Mathematics

10.02

3.1

3.2

3.3 9.89

62.18

Mathematics Concepts

12.44

2.9 7.44

Mathematics Computation

54.79

-

3.1

8.81

.001

.001

8.91

3.1

2.3

10.21

9.90

57.18

48.11

Total Reading

9.88

.001

7.15

3.0 2.3

11.71

11.57

57.11

48.00

Reading

60.43

.001

8.66

2.9 2.1

10.47

7.75

53.89

42.78

Word Analysis

Spelling

.001

8.55 3.1

2.4

p<

7.28

Post

t

10.88

Pre

Post

Pre

RG.E.

58.21

Post

SD

50.25

Pre

X

Word Knowledge

Score

7

Results of Metropolitan Achievement Test for English Dominant Grade 2 Students (N= 28)

Table

17

Table 8

Results of the French Version of the Metropolitan Achievement Test for French Dominant Grade 2 Students (N= 9)

Score

SD

X

t

p<

10.97

3.15

.01

4.78

10.14

5.10

.001

50.33

5.50

5.58

3.64

.01

38.78

49.22

4.34

7.51

3.62

.01

Spelling

-

56.22

11.91

Mathematics Computation

-

51.78

6.46

-

_

55.00

11.89

-

-

Pre

Post

Pre

Post

Word Knowledge

36.56

48.78

3.00

Word Analysis

36.00

50.33

40.56

Reading

Total Reading

A

Mathematics Concepts Mathematics

53.33

Problem Solving Total Mathematics

41.33

55.00

-

6.55

5.94

7.18

9.47

.001

Summary. Table 9 compares the performance of the Grade 2 program students with the Grade 2 non-program students . Great care must be taken in comparing the performance of French dominant program students to other program and non-program students since translating the test into French most likely alters its level of difficulty. The English dominant program students earned higher post-test scores than did the non-program students. The program should be commended on accomplishing its goal of program students performing at least as well as non-program students.

B

Program-French Program-English Non-Program A and B

Reading

Program-French Program-English Non-Program A and B

Word Analysis

Program-French Program-English Non-Program A and

Word Knowledge

Score/Group

.001

10.24 3.0

2.0

8.40

5.58

11.71 11.17

11.53 9.63 57.11 53.15

48.00 39.90

28 41

.01

.001 .001

3.64

7.15 8.04

-

3.0 2.7

-

2.3 1.8

3.0 1.9 8.40

5.50

12.74

2.9 2.1

10.47

50.33

.001

.001

8.66

40.56

7.26

54.22

40.05

.001

5.10

-

10.14

9

7.75

53.89

42.78

4.78

28 41

50.33

36.00

9

45.00

10.97

41

56.85

.001

8.55

3.1

10.88

58.21

50.25

28

2.4

10.97

7.28

P<

.01

t

3.15

Post

-

Pre

-

Post

3.00

Pre

48.78

Post

SD

36.56

Pre

X

9

N

Performance of Program and Non-Program Grade Two Students on Metropolitan Achievement Test

Table 9

Program-French Program- English Non-Program A and B

Mathematics Concepts

Program- English Non-Program A and B

Program-French

28 41

9

55.00 62.18 56.67

52.05

41

28

11.89 9.89 7.14

6.46 7.44 5.49

3.3 3.0

_

2.9 2.7

-

-

_

3.62 8.91 9.60

t

_

Non-Program A and B

51.78 54.79

9.92

9

2.7

9.88

54.63

41

Mathematics Computation

3.1

11.91

-

2.3 1.9

3.1 2.8

Post

60.43

7.51 10.21 10.50

Pre

56.22

-

4.34 9.90 9.17

Post

XG.E.

9

49.22 57.18 54.32

Post

Pre

SD

28

38.87 48.11 41.46

Pre

X

Program- English

28 41

9

N

Program French

Spelling

Program-French Program-English Non-Program A and B

Total Reading

Score/Group

Table 9 (Cont.)

-

-

.01 .001 .001

P<

Sarr

Program-French Program-English Non-Program A and B

Total Mathematics

Program - French Program- English Non - Program A and B

Problem Solving

Mathematics

Score/Group

28 41

9

28 41

9

N

41.33 ' 50.50 42.05

Pre

X

55.00 62.32 56.85

53.33 61.93 56.57

Post

10.02 7.33

5.94

-

Pre

SD

Table 9 (Cont.)

7.18 10.02 4.83

6.55 12.44 7.25

Post

2.3 1.8

-

-

Pre

2.7

3.1

-

3.2 2.9

Post

XG.E.

9.47 8.81 18.72

t

.001 .001 .001

P

21

English As A Second Language

Kindergarten and Grade 1 English Oral Production Test. This test measures the students' ability to speak English. Therefore, it was administered to the French dominant students as a pre and post-test to assess their English as a Second Language skills. This instrument was individually administered to the students and required them to respond in complete sentences to questions asked by the tester, some of which referred to picture stimuli. A raw score , generally ranging from 9 to 60, reflected the students' performance, and was based on their fluency of responses, usage of grammar, and usage of idioms. A major limitation to this test is that students must be reminded to speak in complete sentences since many questions could be answered by "Yes" or "No"; therefore, in some instances a student's performance on the test does not reflect his actual acquisition of English . Tables 10 and 11 summarizes the students' performance on the English Oral Production Test by reporting the t-tests for correlated data used to compare pre and post scores of kindergarten and Grade 1 students, respectively. Although both groups increased their mean score from pre to post-testing, only Grade 1 students demonstrated a statistically significant gain. Since the evaluator administered both the pre and post-tests , it is possible that the kindergarten students were less verbal on the tests than they would have been with their teacher; this could explain their lack of significant gains from pre to post-test. The Grade 1 students , who were more familiar with the tester since they had been in the program for two years , were seemingly not shy about responding to the tester.

Table 10

Results of English Oral Production Test for Kindergarten Students (N= 9)

R Pre

16.74

SD

p<

t

9.92

1.11 Post

20.43

10.32

IA)S' Iv t)

NS

22

Table 11

Results of English Oral Production Test for Grade 1 Students (N= 12)

X

SD

Pre

18.38

7.87

Post

30.08

6.74

P<

5.64

.001

Grade 2

Metropolitan Achievement Test. Grade 2 French dominant students were administered the Metropolitan Primer as a pre-test and Metropolitan Primary I as a post-test to measure their acquisition of English skills in reading and mathematics. Table 12 described the performance of Grade 2 French dominant students. These students showed a statistically significant increase in mean score between their pre and post-test scores. The program should be highly commended on the excellent post-test performance of the students. With the exception of the Word Analysis subtests , French dominant students earned mean grade equivalent scores far above their actual grade placement of 2.9 at the time of the testing. These data, together with their scores on the French Version of the Metropolitan, suggest that they are truly becoming bilingual.

French As A Second Language

Kindergarten and Grade 1 French Version of Comprehension of Oral Language Test. The Comprehension of Oral Language Test was transformed into French to assess the aural French skills of the French as a Second Language students in kindergarten and Grade 1. This 35-item test provides an estimate of a students' ability to understand words and short verbal expressions presented orally in French. For each item the student

91

Total Mathematics

Total Reading 45.75

3.2

10.92

10.66

62.62

3.7

-

19.81

-

63.12

5.97

.001

-

.01

.01

3.62

2.5

3.89

-

p<

-

t

3.0

3.1

-

Pre Post

YG.E.

-

14.10

6.10

57.63

35.75

Reading

9.77

4.87

48.00

36.25

Word Analysis

11.46

-

57.00

Word Knowledge

-

Post

SD

Pre

Post

X

Pre

Subtest

Results of Metropolitan Achievement Test for French Dominant Grade 2 Students (N= 8)

Table 12

24

makes an X on one of four pictures which corresponds to the French stimulus sentence read aloud by the examiner. Tables 13 and 14 report the results of the English dominant students on this test which was used to measure their French as a second language aural skills. Kindergarten students completed 15 items; Grade 1 students were administered the entire test. The tester found that, at the time of the pre-test, the students in the kindergarten classes had no comprehension of the stimuli questions in French; therefore, after administering ten items without any responses , the examiner discontinued the test. (Since the 1973-1974 pre-test was administered in September, instead of in late November, when the 1972-1973 pre-test was administered, the students had not received enough French instruction to result in a pretest score.) The evaluator recommends that no pre-test be given to incoming kindergarten students for 1974-1975. Table 13 shows that the kindergarten students answered approximately two thirds of the test items correctly on the post-test; this is a gain of educational significance. The Grade 1 students mastered almost one-half of the items on the post-tests , as shown in Table 14, which reports the t-test for correlated data used to compare their pre and post-test scores. In addition, the Grade 1 students demonstrated a significant gain in their score on the French Version of the Comprehension of Oral Language Test.

Table 13

Results of French Version of Comprehension of Oral Language Test (15 items) for Kindergarten English Dominant Students (N= 30)

31

Pre

No Score

Post

9.97

SD

2.22

25

Table

14

Results of French Version of Comprehension of Oral Language Test for Grade 1 English Dominant Students ([email protected] 34)

Pre Post

Grade

i

SD

5.97

3.34

15.88

4.65

t

p<

10.12

.001

2

French Version of Metropolitan Achievement Tests. The Grade 2 English dominant students were administered the Primer level of the Metropolitan, transformed into French, as pre and post-tests. The raw scores were used for the analysis shown in Table 15. The students demonstrated a statistically and educationally significant increase in the "A l'ecoute des sons" and "Mathematique" scores, but the practical gain in the "Lecture" score was small. This could be due to the fact that no formal instruction in reading in French is introduced in Grade 2. Those students who earned high scores on the "Lecture" subtest used their English decoding skills and applied them to the French "Lecture."

Content Area Skills in English Kindergarten and Grade 1

Tests of Basic Experiences. The Tests of Basic Experiences are a series of standardized group tests for young children. Five tests are available at each of two levels: Level K is designed for children in the preschool or kindergarten age group, and Levet L is designed for either kindergarten or Grade 1 children. The TOBE battery includes the Language , Mathematics , Social Studies, Science , and General Concepts Tests , each with 28 items. All but the General Concepts test

29

26

Table 15

Results of Metropolitan Achievement Test (French

Version) for Grade 2 French as a Second Language Students (N= 33)

Subtest

SD

X

p

t

Pre

Post

Pre

L'Ecoute des Sons

22.91

31.48

5.96

5.28

7.66

.001

Lecture

17.67

19.30

4.52

3.66

2.44

.01

Mathematique

22.30

29.27

4.20

2.60

9.76

.001

Post

were administered since the General Concepts test is a global measure, covered in greater depth by the other four tests. Table 16 shows the performance of the kindergarten and Grade 1 students on the tests , which were administered in English by the classroom teacher. They demonstrated a highly statistically significant improvement in their scores from the pre to post-test. A Class Evaluation Record which accompanies the tests shows the strengths and weaknesses of each individual student in the class. The results of these tests , then, provide a structured measurement of the degree of accomplishment of specific objectives for each class. These class evaluation records are used by the teachers to monitor the effectiveness of the curriculum in providing relevant educational experiences.

Although this test was not originally included in the standardized testing program , the teachers feel that this measure should continue to be used in the program classes , and the 1974-1975 evaluation design specifies that the TOBE will be administered. The results are clear and concise , and the teachers are able to improve their instructional programs according to student needs because the strengths and weakneses of each child are delineated on the class record.

30

27

Table 16

Results of Tests of Basic Experiences for Kindergarten and Grade 1 Students

Group/Subtest

SD

X

N

t

Pre

Post

Pre

43 44 42 45

61.14 61.34 61.10 61.80

74.14 69.30 69.95 74.76

7.50 7.62 9.28 11.19

7.87 7.67 8.95 9.39

10.45 5.98 5.21 7.91

.001 .001 .001 .001

49 48 48

59.63 61.81 62.33 61.31

72.02 71.83 70.54 68.94

7.76 8.32 10.99 9.60

7.36 7.56 9.65 9.76

11.38 8.22 6.47 6.68

.001 .001 .001 .001

Post

Kindergarten (Level K) Language Mathematics Social Studies Science

Grade 1 (Level L) Language Mathematics

Social Studies Science

48

Social-Emotional Development

Kindergarten, Grade 1, Grade 2 Pupil Behavior Inventory. This 28 item rating scale was completed by each teacher for her students at the beginning and end of the program year to assess their social-emotional development. The Pupil Behavior Inventory is composed of four subscales: Classroom Conduct, Academic Motivation and Performance, Socio-Emotional State, and Teacher Dependence.

28

For each item on the Inventory the teacher indicated whether the student demonstrated the behavior "very frequently ," "frequently," "sometimes ," "infrequently ," or "very infrequently ." These ratings are transformed into a numerical scale ranging from 5 to 1, with 5 representing either a very frequent demonstration of a positive behavior, such as "shows initiative," or a very infrequent demonstration of a negative behavior such as "disrupts classroom procedures." The ratings for all items in a dimension are summed; this total is then divided by the number of items rated in the dimension, yielding a dimension score between 5 and 1, with 5 representing extremely desirable behavior, and 1 representing extremely undesirable behavior.

Table 17 reports the students' ratings on the Total score, and the t-tests for correlated data used to compare pre and post total scores . Program students in kindergarten and Grade 1 demonstrated highly significant improvement. Grade 2 students did not change their overall behavior at a statistically significant level, but did demonstrate satisfactory development, since the mean scores were greater than 3.00, the midpoint of the scale . Table 17

Results of Pupil Behavior InventoryTotal Score

Group

Pre

"R

SD

3.57

0.41

Kindergarten (N=42)

Post

4.63

0.41

Pre

3.41

0.64

Post

3.98

0.65

Pre

3.64

0.52

Grade 1 (N=42)

Grade 2 (N=44)

Post

3.74

0.69

p<

16.83

.001

7.51

.001

1.61

NS

29

The Classroom Conduct dimension is a 12-item scale which assesses the classroom behavior of a student by rating his behavior among other students and his relationship to the teacher. Two examples of items on this scale are "resistant to teacher" and "aggressive toward peers." Table 18 describes the students' ratings on this dimension. Again the kindergarten and Grade 1 classes demonstrated highly statistically significant improvement in their classroom conduct from the pre to post rating. Grade 2 students showed no significant improvement, although

they had satisfactory scores on the pre and post rating. Still, the ratings for all groups were greater than 3.50 reflecting very satisfactory classroom conduct. Table 18

Results of Pupil Behavior InventoryClassroom Conduct Dimension

Group

Pre

X

SD

3.82

0.44

Kindergarten (N=42)

Post

4.68

0.45

Pre

3.20

0.85

Grade 1 (N=42)

Post

3.79

0.83

Pre

3.71

0.66

Post

3.75

0.85

Grade 2 (N=44)

p

11.84

.001

6.22

.001

0.42

NS

The Academic Motivation and Performance dimension "focuses on the pupil's motivation toward and performance of academic tasks ." This dimension includes such

items as "hesitant to try, or gives up easily," and "uninterested in subject matter." As reported in Table 19, students in Kindergarten and Grade 1 demonstrated a significant improvement in their academic motivation and performance. Grade 2 students showed no significant improvement, although both mean scores were satisfactory. The ratings for all groups on this subscale were greater than 3.00 the rating considered to reflect satisfactory motivation and performance.

30

Table 19

Results of Pupil Behavior InventoryAcademic Motivation and Performance Dimension

Group

Pre

X

SD

3.24

0.52

Kindergarten (N=42)

Post

4.51

0.62

Pre

3.56

0.91

Post

4.11

0.76

Pre

3.48

0.83

Grade 1 (N=42)

Grade 2 (N =44)

Post

3.51

t

13 <

14.73

.001

5.88

.001

0.26

NS

0.98

The Socio-Emotional State dimension includes five items designed to assess the emotional and social adjustment of the student, especially his interactions with his peers. Items in this dimension include "friendly and well received by other pupils ," and "isolated, few or no friends ." Table 20 reports that, like the students' classroom conduct and academic motivation and performance, the kindergarten and Grade 1 students improved during the school year. Grade 2 also showed a significant improvement for this dimension. In addition, all mean scores were greater than 3.50 .

The fourth dimension, Teacher Dependence, provides a measure of the students' need for reassurance from the teacher , with lower scores representing a greater dependence on the teacher. This dimension contains only two items: "seeks constant reassurance" and "possessive of teacher." Table 21 indicates, however, that program students become more independent during the program year; their scores increased to a statistically significant degree.

3,1

31

Table 20 Results of Pupil Behavior InventorySocial- Emotional State Dimension

X

SD

Pre

3.75

0.51

Post

4.69

0.46

Pre

3.76

0.60

Group

Kindergarten (N=42)

Grade 1 (N=42)

Post

4.37

0.53

Pre

3.83

0.56

Grade 2 (N =44)

Post

4.07

0.56

35)

t

P<

10.63

.001

5.96

.001

3.06

.01

32

Table 21

Results of Pupil Behavior InventoryTeacher Dependence Dimension

Group

Pre

3I

SD

3.13

0.44

Kindergarten (N=42)

Post

4.71

0.57

Pre

3.11

0.86

Post

3.62

0.81

Pre

3.47

0.88

3.85

0.91

Grade 1 (N=42)

Grade 2 (N=44)

Post

t

p<

17.91

.001

3.58

.001

2.48

.01

Evaluation of Product Objectives

The evaluation design of product objectives was revised for 1973-1974 to include assessment of sub-objectives and specific objectives described in the curriculum guide developed for the project. The sub-objectives were developed to better define the global (program) objectives. A global (program) objective was rated as accomplished by a student when he had accomplished all specific and subobjectives related to it.

Evaluation of objectives was based on the teacher's rating of whether the child could do the activity described. The on-site evaluator verified the accuracy of these ratings by her retesting a sample of students on each objective during the course of the program year. The evaluator feels that on the basis of her classroom observations and discussions with the teachers, that the majority of the students worked up to their potential and, in some cases, worked beyond normal expectations. The teachers' continual focusing of instruction on the objectives explains their high degree of accomplishment by the students.

33

The teachers are to be commended for their work in accomplishing the product objectives. Classroom aides were invaluable in preparing materials and assisting the teacher by reinforcing concepts and skills originally presented by the teacher.

During the second year of the project, most of the objectives were accomplished. This is especially noteworthy since the criterion levels of the objectives were increased from the initial program year. In the kindergarten and Grade 1 classes , all objectives were achieved. The French dominant students as a group scored slightly lower than the English dominant students . This difference could be due to the smaller number of students tested, their lack of basic experiences. or the difference in their home environment. 1973-1974 was the first year in which Grade 2 classes were in the project. Although a large percentage of students accomplished the global objectives , they experienced difficulty with some of the sub-objectives. They were either too difficult for the students or appropriate materials were not available to use in instruction. The following limitations in the accomplishment of specific objectives were noted: 1.

Objective 2-4.2 #1-b-- "The students will be able to listen to poems , rhyming jingles , and short stories to develop comprehension and oral language development"--was not accomplished because poems and rhyming jingles in French were difficult to find, so only stories in French were read to the students . This specific objective will be revised for the 1974-1975 program.

2.

Objective 2-3.1 #3-- "The students will be able to play simple rhythm patterns on rhythm instruments to accompany the French songs they have learned"--will also be revised since the rhythm patterns were taught by the music teacher with English songs and not French songs.

3.

Objective 2-2.1 #1-- "The students will demonstrate their knowledge of numerals 1-100 in French by Oral sequence and also be able to associate the graphic with the oral"--was not completely accomplished; both grade 2 classes demonstrated their knowledge of the numerals 1-80 orally and graphically . The evaluator recommends that this objective be retained as written 19741975 , and a review of the instructional methods be made to insure its accomplishment.

The structuring of sub-objectives and specific objectives to further define the global objectives of the program was a major improvement in the program. Copies of the curriculum were distributed and also are available in the project files. The major emphasis in the development of these objectives was to provide

34

the teachers with a tool to assist in implementing the bilingual program in their classrooms. The teachers and other staff feel that this goal was accomplished.

The following charts describe the degree of accomplishment of each product objective The left -most column specifies the objectives. The next column reports the percentage of students who increased their score from pre to post-test or who achieved a score on the post-test at least as high as the criterion score specified in the objective. The next column reports whether or not the analysis standardized test results for the entire group at the appropriate grade level indicated that the objective was accomplished. The right column includes comments to clarify the evaluation of the objective.

3a

35

Summary Chart for Kindergarten Product Objectives (N=50)

OBJECTIVE

% of Students Having Met

the Objective

Is the Objective Achieved?

Comment

Yes

Four students were

K-1.1

At the conclusion of the year , Anglo-American children will demonstrate the reading readiness skills at an equal level of achievement compared to the

96%

not tested. The students performed as well as the comparison group , 95% of which made gains in

comparison group. The skills will be measured by the Associative Vocabulary subtest of the Preschool Inventory administered by the Evaluator. The reading readiness skills to be measured are: word meaning, listening skills and

their score. Two program students received Special Services.

matching skills . K-1.2

By the end of the year, the Franco-American children will demonstrate statistically significant improvement in English Language Arts as measured by the English Oral Production test, Primary Level, administered by the Evaluator in September and May/June.

Yes

82%

311

36

Summary Chart for Kindergarten Product Objectives (N=50)

OBJECTIVE

% of Students Having Met

Is the Objective

the Objective

Achieved?

Comment

K-2.1

By the end of the year, the Anglo-American children will demonstrate achievement in

98%

Yes

tested. The program students performed as well as the comparison

Mathematics equal to that of the comparison group when administered the Concept Activation-Numerical subtest of the Preschool Inventory in September and May/June.

group of which 95%

made gains in their score.

K-2 . 2

By the end of the year, the Franco-American children will demonstrate a statistically significant gain in their achieve ment in Mathematics as measure by a project-developed pre and post test based on the Concept Activation Numerical subtest of the Preschool Inventory test. This test will be given in

Four students were not

87%

September and May /June by the Evaluator.

10

Yes

37

Summary Chart for Kindergarten Product Objectives (N=50)

OBJECTIVE

% of Students Having Met

the Objective

Is the Objective Achieved?

Comment

K-3.1

Children will demonstrate a statistically significant increase in their achievement in the following; concepts of

97%

Yes

gains in their score.

size, shape, color, motion, and visual-motor performance. This will be measured by the Concept-Sensory subtest of the Preschool Inventory administered in September and May/ June by the Evaluator. K-4.1

By the end of the year the Franco-American children will demonstrate a statistically significant gain in their achievement of readiness skills in French as measured by a pre and post project-developed test based on the Associative Vocabulary subtest of the Preschool Inventory . The evaluator will administer the test in September and May/

June. The areas to be measured are: word meaning, listening, matching.

97$ of the comparison group also demonstrated

81%

Yes

38

Summary Chart for Kindergarten Product Objectives (N=50)

OBJECTIVE.:

% of Students Having Met

Is the Objective

the Objective

Achieved?

Comment

K-4.2

By the end of the year the Anglo-American children will demonstrate a statistically significant gain in their proficiency in French oral skills as measured by a projectdeveloped test based on the Comprehension of Oral Language test. The evaluator will administer the test in September and May/June.

66%

Yes

There was no comprehension of French in the Fall.

Yes

Of 43 students rated on the post test the following percentage earned scores of at least 3.00 in Classroom Conduct 100%

K-5.1

Children will demonstrate a satisfactory behavior of at least 3.000 in the following areas: classroom conduct, academic motivation and performance, socio-emotional state , teacher dependence. This will be measured by the Pupil Behavior Inventory administered in September and

9873

Academic Motivation

and Performance 100% Socio-Emotional State -10W Teacher Dependence -98%

May /June

l'r,

'I,:,

39

Summary Chart for Grade 1 Product Objectives (N=50)

0IhIECTIVE

% of Students Having Met

the Objective

By the end of the year, the Anglo-American children will demonstrate reading skills in English equivalent to the control group on the Metro '70 Primer pre-test and Metro Primary I post-test in the following areas: 1) Listening for Sounds 2) Reading

95%

Is the

Yes

92%

Yes

97%

Yes

1-2.1

By the end of the year the Anglo-American children will demonstrate achievement in Mathematics equivalent to that of the control group when administered the Metro '70 Primer pre-test and post-test in September and May/June. The test will be administered by the Evaluator.

There are three children being retained, one of which received Special Services.

1 -1.2

By the end of the year, the Franco-American student will demonstrate a statistically significant gain in English Language Arts as measured by the English Oral Production test, Level I, administered in September and May/June by the Evaluator.

Commelit

()meetly e Achieved?

43

40

Summary Chart for Grade 1 Product Objectives (N=50)

0I3JECTIVE

, of Students Having Met

the Objective

Is the Objective Achieved?

Comment

1-2.2

By the end of the year, the Franco-American children will demonstrate a statistically significant gain in their

85%

Yes

1.00%

Yes

85%

Yes

achievement in Mathematics

as measured by a projectdeveloped test based on the Metro '70 Primer administered in September and May/June by the Evaluator . 1-3.1

By the end of the year, the students will demonstrate achievement of 70% in music art, and creative arts . Evalu-

ation of student performance will be done by the teacher and recorded in student

product folders. Folders will be checked by the Evaluator in December, March , and May .

1-4.1

By the end of the year , the Franco-American students will show a statistically significant gain in their achievement in French as measured by a project-developed pre and post test based on the Metro '70 and administered by the Evaluator in September and May/June .

All students achieved according to their potential .

41

Summary Chart for Grade 1 Product Objectives (N=50)

0I3JECTIVE

Is the Objective Achieved?

o of Students Having Met the Objective

Comment

1-4.2 The Anglo-American students will show a statistically significant gain in their achievement in French as measured by a project-developed test based on the Comprehension or Oral Language and administered by the Evaluator in September and May/June.

81%

Yes

81%

Yes

1-5.1

Students will demonstrate a statistically significant increase in their achievement in the following areas: Classroom conduct, Academic Motivation and Performance, Socio-Emotional State, Teacher Dependence. This will be measured by the Pupil Behavior Inventory administered in September and May/June.

Of 43 students rated on the post-test, the folio% ing percentage earned scores of at least 3.00 in Classroom Conduct 8( 0-6 Academic Motivation

and Performance 91% Socio-Emotional State 1009 Teacher Dependence 81%

41 t

i

42

Summary Chart for Grade 2 Product Objectives (N=46)

OBJECTIVE,

of Students Having Met

the Objective

Comment

Is the Objective Achieved?

2-1.1

By the end of the year, the Anglo-American students will demonstrate achievement in English equivalent to that of the control group when administered Metro Primary I pre test and Metro Primary II post test in the following areas:

The comparison group achieved 88%. Three

Yes

88%

program students received Special Services .

Word Knowledge

Analysis , Reading .4

2-1.2

By the end of the year, the Franco-American students will demonstrate achievement equivalent to that of the first grade English dominant program students of the year

Yes

88%

The Metro Primary I (transformed) was administered as a post

test.

(1972-1973) when administered the Metro '70 Primer in English by the Evaluator.

46

43

Summary Chart for Grade 2 Product Objectives (N=46)

OBJECTIVE

% of Students Having Piet

Is the Objective

the Objective

Achieved?

Comment

2-2.1 Students will demonstrate achievement in Math equivalent to that of the control group when administered the Metro '70 Primary I pre test in Septem-4 ber and Metro '70 Primary II post test administered in May/ June , by the Evaluator. Franco-American students will demonstrate their achievement' at no more than half a year below the English dominant students.

90%

Yes

75%

Yes

The comparison group achieved 89%. The Franco-American students achieved grade level.

2-4.2 By the end of the year , the Anglo-American students will demonstrate a statistically significant increase in French as measured by a projectdeveloped test based on the Metro '70 Primer and administered in September and May/June by the Evaluator.

4

1

44

Summary Chart for Grade 2 Product Objectives (N=46)

OBJECTIVE

of Students Baying Mot

the Objective

Is the Objective Achieved?

Connue»t

2-5.1

Students will demonstrate a statistically significant increase in their achievement in the following areas: Classroom Conduct, Academic Motivation and Performance, Socio-Emotional State , Teacher Dependence. This will be measured by the Pupil Behavior Inventory administered in September and May/June.

76%

Yes

Of 46 students rated on the post-test, the following percentage earned scores of at least 3.00 in Classroom Conduct 82%

Academic Motivation and Performance 76% Social-Emotional State -961

Teacher Dependence

48

89%

45

Evaluation of Process Objectives

A series of process objectives was formulated to describe instructional activities which should result in the accomplishment of the instructional product objectives . Monitoring of the occurrence of process activities was performed by the teacher through completion of process checklists and by the evaluator through classroom observation. The teachers are to be commended for their performance of the majority of process objectives , and for their implementation of innovations in improving their instructional program. The appropriateness of the activities performed and materials used is suggested by the students' accomplishment of product objectives.

The following charts describe the occurrence of the specified process activities . The left-most column reports the objective; the second column indicates the percentage of total school days the process was used; the third column includes comments about the implementation of particular process activities, such as when different materials than specified in the objective were used. The Art and Music process objective was used bi-weekly; the 100% frequency was based on the bi-weekly occurrence. (It is appropriate to note here that the Art teacher will not be teaching the kindergarten classes during the 1974-1975 school year since she will be teaching Grade 5 instead. The kindergarten classroom teacher will assume the responsibility for teaching art during the 1974-1975 school year.)

4 ;3

46

Summary Chart for Kindergarten Process Objectives

OBJECTIVES

Percentage

Comments

of Days

Process Occurred K-1.1P

Children will participate in reading readiness activities daily stressing the reading readiness skills listed above, and supplementing them with such mater-

In addition, games and pictures and the Getting

94%

Ready to Read booklets (Houghton-Mifflin) were used.

ials as the Language Master, ALAP-AB

series, taped lessons, records, teachermade materials , etc. K-1.2P

Children will participate daily in English Language Arts activities stressing the listening comprehension and speaking skills . Materials such as Language Master , taped lessons, records, teachermade materials , story reading, etc. will be used.

96%

Much oral languagt, development was done using action words, commands, and directions.

96%

Parent volunteers helped reinforce the concepts taught, through games and activities.

K-2.1P

Children will participate in daily activities in English stressing ability to label quantities, to make judgement of more or less , to recognize seriated positions, number identification, number naming, counting, order to numbers, and will supplement these activities with Unifix Materials, Language Master, Harcourt, Brace & Jovanovich materials, number games , etc . r-

50

47

Summary Chart for Kindergarten Process Objectives

OBJECTIVES

Percentage

Comments

of Days

Process Occurred K-2.2P

Children will participate daily in activities in French stressing number identification, number naming, counting, ordering, ability to label quantities, to make judgement of more or less and to recognize seriated position. These activities will be supplemented with Harcourt, Brace and Jovanovich materials , Language Masters, Number games, teacher-made materials, etc .

96%

See K-2.1P

96%

Different experiences were provided through field trips and by parent volunteers.

94%

The French Curriculum was used to develop and enhance the skills being taught. Much oral language development was used, through games, following directions, and dramatizing.

K-3.1P

Children will participate daily in activities stressing the above skills and concepts using materials such as Language Masters, Talking Dictionaries, Unifix materials , Attribute blocks. manipulative materials , colored charts and blocks, Peabody Kits , puzzles, Sense and Tell Kits , Posters, teacher-made materials , etc. K-4.1P

Children will participate daily in activities stressing the above skill areas using materials such as Language Masters,

tapes, records, posters, charts , teachermade materials, etc.

48

Summary Chart for Kindergarten Process Objectives

OBJECTIVES

Percentage

Comments

of Days

Process Occurred K-4.2P

Children will participate daily in activities stressing the comprehension, listening and speaking skills in French using materials such as: Language Masters, records, tapes, posters , charts, teacher-made materials, etc .

94%

See K-4.1P

K-5.1P

Children will participate daily in group or individual activities stressing the above areas and using materials such as specified in each sub-objectives included in our Curriculum Guide.

100%

r0

I. .1,-

This process enveloped the total class program using attitudinal approaches

49

Summary Chart for Grade 1 Process Objectives

OBJECTIVES

Percentage

Comments

of Days

Process Occurred

1-1.1P

Children will participate daily in activities stressing the above skills. Materials to be used are Ginn Kit, Peabody Kit, Perceptive Reading Series, Ginn 360, Language Master cards, charts, posters, etc .

97%

In addition to the activities listed, the HoughtonMifflin series and Systerh 80 were used.

1-1.2P

All children will participate daily in activities stressing listening, speaking and pre-reading skills in English. Materials such as Ginn Kit, Peabody kit, Perceptive reading series, Ginn 360, Language Masters, charts, posters, tapes, etc . will be used.

9'796

Much oral language development was experi-

enced using directions, commands and action

words.

1-2.1P

Children will participate daily in English activities stressing counting, measurement, numeral recognition, addition and subtraction of one-digit numbers , etc. Materials such as Unifix Materials , Harcourt, Brace & Jovanovich, etc. will be used.

94%

Students used tactile and kinetic materials as well as actual measurement and other practical application exercises.

8896

Much oral language development was experienced, stressing vocabulary and concept development .

1-2.2P

Children will participate daily in French activities stressing basic mathematical principles and concepts, and addition and subtraction of one-digit numbers. Materials such as Unifix materials, number games, counting frames, teachermade materials, etc. will be used.

JAS

50

Summary Chart for Grade 1 Process Objectives

OBJECTIVES

Percentage

Comments

of Days

Process Occurred 1-3.1P

Children will participate twice a week in art and music activities, in dramatization, role playing, puppet theater as indicated in the project curriculum guide. The materials to be used are also listed in the curriculum guide for each subobjective .

100%

The Art teacher and Music teacher were in the classroom once every two weeks. The other classes were taught by the classroom teacher . Art was taught in French, music in English. The classroom teacher taught music in French at other times.

1-4.1P

The students will participate daily in activities stressing the listening Comprehension, Speaking and Reading readiness skills . Materials such as Language Master , tapes, filmstrips, teacher-made materials , etc. will be

97%

used .

The French curriculum was used to develop and enhance the skills being taught. Much oral language development occurred through games, following directions, and dramatization.

1 -4.2P

The students will participate in activities stressing the listening and speaking skills in French. Materials such as Language Masters, filmstrips, tapes , posters , charts , teacher-made materials, etc. will be used.

88%

Oral language development exercises were used as well as System 80, stories in French, and dramatizations.

51

Summary Chart for Grade 1 Process Objectives

OBJECTIVES

Percentage

Comments

of Days

Process Occurred

1-5.1P

Children will participate daily in group or individual activities dealing with the above areas and using materials such as specified in each sub-objective included in our Curriculum Guide.

100%

This process enveloped the total class program using attitudinal approaches throughout.

52

Summary Chart for Grade 2 Process Objectives

OBJECTIVES

Comments

Percentage of Days

Process Occurred

2-1..1P

Students will participate daily in activities stressing word knowledge, word analysis, reading sentences, reading stories, etc. Materials such as basal

96%

The System 80 was also

used.

test Ginn 360, Houghton Mifflin , Lan-

guage Masters, tapes, teacher-made materials, etc . will be used. 2-1.2P

Students will participate in activities stressing listening for beginning and ending sounds , sound-letter relationship , beginning reading skills , word knowledge, word analysis, comprehension of written materials (simple sentences and paragraphs). Materials such as Ginn 360, Houghton Mifflin, Language Masters, tapes, records , teacher-made materials , etc. will be used.

96%

The System 80 was also

used.

2-2.1P

Students will participate in daily math activities stressing counting, measurement, numeral recognition , place value, sets, addition and subtraction of one and two digit numbers, etc . Materials such as Harcourt, Brace & Jovanovich, Peabody Kit, Language Masters, Cuisenaire Rods, games, teacher-made materials , etc . , will be used.

89%

Practical experiences were provided where students had to measure, weigh, etc., using concrete materials.

53

Summary Chart for Grade 2 Process Objectives

OBJECTIVES

Percentage

Comments

of Days

Process Occurred

2-3.1P

Children will participate twice a week in art and music activities, in dramatization, role playing, puppet theater, as indicated in the project curriculum guide. The materials to be used are also listed in the curriculum guide for each subobjective.

1.00%

The Art teacher and Music

teacher were in the classroom once every two weeks. The other classes were taught by the classroom teacher. Art was taught in French, Music in English. The The classroom teacher taught music in French at other times.

2-4.1P

Students will participate daily in activities stressing vocabulary acquisition, phonetic reading, copying, oral discriminatin , etc. Materials such as Language Masters, Talking Dictionary, French Readers, experience charts, teachermade materials, etc. will be used.

8596

Experience charts were developed using les "Habiletes a Preparer en Lecture" developed by Sister Yolande Plante as a guide.

2-4.2P

Students will participate daily in activities stressing listening comprehension, speaking skills. and vocabulary acquisition. Materials such as language masters, Talking Dictionary, Charts, posters, tapes, etc . will be used.

Many oral language development exercises were used as well as System 80, stories in French. and student booklets.

54

Summary Chart for Grade 2 Process Objectives

OBJECTIVES

Percentage

Comments

of Days

Process Occurred ,

2-5.1P

Children will participate in daily activities dealing with the above areas and using materials such as specified in each sub-objective included in our Curriculum

100%

This process enveloped the total class program using attitudinal approaches throughout .

Guide.

58

55

STAFF DEVELOPMENT COMPONENT

Description of Activities The Staff Development Component is designed to give to the staff of the Bilingual Project, training in conducting bilingual instruction in the classroom. Activities are structured which involve more of the school personnel in developing educationally , and increasing their teaching proficiency .

This section documents the type of in-service activities offered , the extent of staff participation, and the reactions of the staff to the in-service sessions. Data about in-service activities were gathered from the project files, observation of in-service sessions by the on-site evaluator , and completion of questionnaires about in-service training by the program staff.

Workshops

The program teachers and aides participated in two one-week workshops during the summer and two three-day workshops during the school year. These workshops were conducted by Sister Yolande Plante, consultant from the Service de Liaison des Projets Bilingues Francais-Anglais. The first day of each workshop was specifically directed to the kindergarten and first grade teachers , and the second and third days to the second grade teachers. Six Saturday workshops were also held for the program staff and were conducted by Dr. Norman Dube, consultant from the St. John Valley Bilingual Project. Prior to each workshop, Dr . Dube observed each classroom and then met with the staff to determine the focus for the following workshop. One-Week Workshops: The first one-week workshop was held in July, 1973 in Van Buren with teachers from the St. John Valley Program. Topics discussed included: basic French reading, practice French exercises, demonstration lessons, French grammar, teaching French through poetry , and learning packages. The second one-week workshop was conducted in Caribou by the Program Curriculum Coordinator in August, 1973. The following materials were developed during the week: learning units in mathematics, units on Caribou Culture, French curriculum, and a variety of other instructional materials.

Three-Day Workshops. These workshops were conducted by Sister Yolande Plante, consultant from the Service de Liaison des Projets Bilingues FranyaisAnglais . The Kindergarten and Grade 1 teachers worked with Sister Yolande the first day of the workshop, and the Grade 2 teachers worked with her on the other two days .

5;

56

The first of these workshops was held in December , 1973. The Kindergarten and Grade 1 teachers improved the guidelines for teaching of French language; various methods and approaches were evaluated. Grade 2 teachers worked with Sister Yolande on the following: introduction to the "Method Dynamique," developing units using the "Method Dynamique," and classroom demonstrations by Sister Yolande. The second 3-day workshop was held in March, 1974. Again, the kindergarten and first grade teachers spent one session and the second grade teachers spent two sessions with the consultant. Topics discussed were a follow-up on previous workshop, development of units , classroom demonstrations by teachers and exposure to French materials available for each level.

Saturday Workshops. These workshops were conducted by Dr. Norman Dube, Consultant from the St. John Valley Bilingual Project. All program teachers and aides were invited to participate in these workshops. Prior to each workshop , Dr. Dube observed each classroom; his observations were discussed at each workshop. One workshop was designated for the teachers and aides to work independently on projects of their own choosing. The first workshop was held on October 3, 1973. Topics discussed were modifications and recommendations for 1973-1974 and the second grade curriculum. A second workshop was held on January 19, 1974. Topics discussed were classroom observations and psycho-drama in the classroom. On February 16, 1974 the third workshop was held. Topics included classroom observations, presentation of art materials and books, and development of language tree. The fourth workshop was held on March 16, 1974. Topics discussed were grammar (structure, syntax, semantics), and culture with a small "c". During the workshop of April 27, 1974 the teachers and aides worked independently on projects they were developing. The following areas were the focus of activity. Kindergarten Grade 1

Grade 2

Revision of French Curriculum Begin English Curriculum

Continue development of Social Studies Curriculum

and units. Research on Caribou Culture Research on Caribou Culture Developing units of study

The final workshop held on May 11 , 1974 included a discussion of evaluation of 1973-1974 program, classroom observations, teacher problems, and projections to 1974-1975 school year. Table 22 shows the teacher attendance at and evaluation of the workshops.

1.00%

Week of August, 1973

100%

March , 1974

90% 9095

70%

October 3, 1974

January 19, 1974

February 16, 1974

Saturday workshops

100%

December, 1973

Three-day workshops

100%

Present

O

0

Week of July , 1973

Workshop

Sickness

X

2 aides attended 2 days , 1 aide attended 1 day . (Just hired)

X

X

X

X

X

X

Good

Reaction to Workshop Excellent Very Good

3 aides not yet hired and not counted.

Reason for Absences

Table 22

These workshops are very helpful. Teachers work on projects meaningful for their classroom.

Aides should be included. Two consecutive days of concentrated work is very tiring.

Do not schedule so close to start of school year.

Great opportunity to exchange ideas with other teachers.

Comments

%

7596

90% 60%

April 27, 1974

May 11, 1974

Present

March 16, 1974

Workshop

Sickness

One teacher attended i day because she had a medical appointment; two others were sick.

Reason for Absences

Table 22 (Cont.)

X

X

X

Good

Reaction to Workshop Excellent Very Good

Evaluation of this year's program was done and new approaches were decided on for 1974-75.

Much was accomplished

Comments

59

American Council for Teachers of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) The Director and Evaluator/Curriculum Coordinator attended the PreConvention Workshops and two teachers attended the Convention workshops. The Director participated in the workshop titled "The Francophone World in the French Classroom," and the Evaluatkr/Curriculum Coordinator attended "Relevant Teacher Training for the 1970's ."'Both workshops were well organized and very informative. The two teachers attended the workshops titled, "How to Produce Inexpensive Audiovisual Materials" and "Workshop on Bilingual Education." They also attended various meetings during the Convention. They felt that the information acquired at the workshops and Convention was very educational and worthwhile.

Title VII Director's Meeting, February 23-24, 1974 The Director attended this meeting held in Lafayette , Louisiana for Title VII French-English programs. The topics discussed included: French Title VII project accomplishments , needs , and concerns;

Parallel and related efforts and concerns outside of French Title VII;

The future of the Service de Liaison; Specific tasks and recommendations for Service de Liaison coordination through June. 1974.

The Director submitted a report about the meeting to the Advisory Council and to the Superintendent's office.

Teachers of English to Students of Other Languages (TESOL) The Evaluator/Curriculum Coordinator attended this workshop and convention in Denver, Colorado, from March 5-10, 1974. She participated in the workshop "Designing an Evaluation System for an ESL/Bilingual Education Program" She also attended various meetings during the Convention . A report wet.?, submitted to all staff members , and a copy is in the office files .

63

60

French Title VII Curriculum Coordinators and Evaluators Meeting The Director and Evaluator/Curriculum Coordinator attended this meeting in Boston, Massachusetts on April 8 and 9, 1974. The Agenda included topics of special interest to French-English Bilingual programs; examples of these topics were: Teaching methods for language arts and mathematics , Placement of monolingual students in bilingual classrooms with students who have had three or more years of French,

Materials development for upper level students , Evaluation tools: what and how do you evaluate?

How to develop a curriculum dealing with the culture of the area.

A report about the conference is available in the project files .

Teaching of French as a first and second language. Teaching of English as a second language. Materials development. Setting a curriculum guide for each level. Training in handling special problems (emotionally , retardation, etc .) Individualization in teaching. Integration of subjects in Bilingual teaching.

ment.

Below are areas of needs for our staff develop-

The teachers and aides will participate in summer workshops with qualified instructors to increase their knowledge of and proficiency in Bilingual Education.

SD-1

OBJECTIVE

X

x x x

Accomplished

Partially Accomplished

Evaluation of Staff Development Objectives

Accomplished

Not

sary .

It is to be noted here that although each of the areas of need were addressed to some degree in in-service (i.e. were completely or partially accomplished) they are on-going needs and will be revised or the focus of additional inservice training as neces-

Comments

1973-1974.

A week will be

aside for the teachers and aides in August to prepare and organize their program and materials for the school year

SD-2

The Director will make a..vangements with the University of Maine at Fort kent and Presque Isle, with Service de Liaison this P. ojets Bilingues Francais-Anglais and with other agencies offering classes and/or workshop in the above areas.

SD-1P

OBJECTIVE

X

Accomplished

Partially Accomplished

Evaluation of Staff Development Objectives

Accomplished

Not

1974-1975.

Cra

Although such a workshop 'was held, it was too close to the beginning of school. Plans will be made to have the workshop earlier in

The Direct-' did contact and make arrangements with these agencies.

Comments

CD -. J

1973-1974.

Teachers and aides will show a willingness to participate in classes offered by the University of Maine at Presque Isle or Fort Kent during the first or second semester of the school year

SD-3

The Director will plan the schedule for the workshop with the teachers, and the Curriculum Coordinator will set guidelines for the workshop .

SD-2P

OBJECTIVE

X

X

Accomplished I

:

Partially 'Accomplished

I

Evaluation of Staff Develcpment Objectives

Not

Accomplished

1

The courses French I (Frlc) and French H (Fr2c) were offered, as well as Adult Education courses--beginning and advanced French. 40% of the teachers and aides participated, as well as regular classroom teachers and parents of the students in the program.

schedule was planned by the Director.

the consultants. The

The Director and the Curriculum Coordinator worked together to establish the guidelines for the workshops along with

Comments

The Project Director will be responsible for contacting appropriate consultants or instructors and to make arrangement for organizing on-site or nearby workshops.

SD-4P

The Bilingual Staff will participate in in-service workshops with qualified consultants to acquire more expertise in the field abilingual education and to deal with immediate problems or deficiencies.

SD-4

The Project Director will make arrangements with the above agencies to offer classes which the project staff needs .

SD-3P

OBJECTIVE

X

X

X

Accomplished Not

Accomplished

Partially Accomplished

Evaluation of Staff Development Objectives

The names of the consultants contacted are on file in the office.

three three-day workshops and six Saturday workshops were held to accomplish this objective.

Two one-week workshops ,

arrange these classes.

In addition to the University , the Caribou Adult Education Director was also contacted to

Comments

The Director will set a schedule for monthly staff meetings and will conduct these meetings.

SD-5P

The teachers and aides will attend monthly meetings with the Director and Curriculum Coordinator to look at the direction and progress of the Project and to deal with the specific problems of each classroom.

SD-5

OBJECTIVE

Accomplished

X

X

Partially Accomplished

Evaluation of Staff Development Objectives

Accomplished

Not

;after the Saturday workshops and not monthly as stated. However, the Director and Curriculum Coordinator are in constant contact with the teachers to handle any specific problems.

Meetings were held

after the Saturday workshops and not monthly as stated. However, the Director and Curriculum Coordinator are in constant contact with the teachers to handle any specific problems.

Meetings were held

Comments

The Director will set a schedule for the workshops and the Curriculum Coordinator will organize the structure of the workshops.

SD-6P

The project staff will participate in two workshops designed to review existing objectives and to bring about the necessary modifications or refinement. These workshops will be scheduled for October and April.

SD-6

OBJECTIVE

X

X

Accomplished

Partially Accomplished

Evaluation of Staff Development Objectives

Accomplished

Not

ganize the structure of ; the workshops. The schedule was arranged by the Director.

culum Coordinator worked together to or-

'The Director and Curri-

1

Modifications or

refinements in objectives were implemented when Vie need occurred.

May .

These workshops were held in October and

Comments

67

COMMUNITY INVOLVEMENT COMPONENT

Description of Activities The Community Involvement Component was designed to involve the parents of Title VII students and the community in the Bilingual Project through the activities of the Advisory Council, whose function is to provide direction for the project; to keep the public informed about Title VII; to implement a parent volunteer system in the Title VII classrooms; to have adult classes in French; and to establish and maintain a liaison with the University of Maine at Presque Isle and Fort Kent.

The Advisory Council demonstrated continuous involvement through monthly meetings. The percentage of attendance was 65%; the absences of members were due to such circumstances as being out of the area on business trips or conferences, having a baby, and sickness. Meetings were held on October 9, November 13, and December 4, 1973, January 18, February 12, March 7, April 16, and May 14, 1974.

The Advisory Council sponsored two Newsletters, one distributed in January and one in June. Parents contributed poems, historical narratives, and favorite recipes; pictures of the teachers and aides involved in activities in the classrooms were also included. Articles by contemporary writers that were appropriate for parents were also published. These newsletters were distributed to the parents, the Administration, other school personnel, Chamber of Commerce, businesses and professional offices in the city; an attempt was made to distribute copies to as many citizens as possible. Adult education classes were also offered to parents and staff during the year. Fifteen adults participated. The Bilingual Program, in cooperation with the University of Maine in Presque Isle, offered an advanced French course, French II (Fr2c) for the parents of children in the program and the staff. Ten adults participated. Two of the program classes visited the Nursing Home and put on skits for the elderly during the year. More of these programs are planned for the coming year. In addition, McDonald's of Caribou sponsored all of the classes at the Shriner's Circus in May.

Three meetings for parents and the general public were held during the year. At one meeting the classes presented a Christmas program, where skits were performed. Another meeting had guest speakers from the St. John Valley Bilingual Project. The third meeting was held to review the program activities and progress during the year and to discuss the projections for the 1974-1975 school

year.

71

68

The Caribou Bilingual Project was also instrumental in developing the ETV program "La Machine Magique" which was aired over station MPBN at the University of Maine in Orono. These weekly programs were viewed by the classes, and were found especially appropriate for the second graders. Many parents viewed the program at home and, although a formal survey to obtain opinions about the program was not conducted, many favorable comments were reported to the project staff.

The parent volunteer assistance program was very successful in the kindergarten classes. Twelve parent volunteers helped weekly in the classroom by reinforcing the skills learned by the students . Grades 1 and 2 had periodic parent help during the school year, but not on a regular basis. The matched guise testing program was conducted in the schools and in the community during the Fall of 1973 by Dr. Howard Giles from Wales and Dr. Norman Lambert from the Department of Psychology at the McGill University in Montreal. A sample of ten, fifteen, and seventeen year old male and female students, and of male and female adults were surveyed. The survey evaluated language attitudes in a rural city in northern Maine. The report concludes: "It would appear that the attitude towards French in the City of Caribou is an extremely favorable one, from the age of ten years up to adulthood." A copy of the report is available in the Bilingual Project office. The project issued news releases for the Aroostook Republican, Bangor Daily News and the St. John Valley Times, using pictures and articles about the classrooms and their projects and activities, descriptions of the activities of the Advisory Council, and reporting of any other news relevant to the program for publicity .

The Caribou Advisory Council for Bilingual Education will meet once a month to discuss the progress of the project and avenues of further involving the community and will make recommendations to the Director and to the Board of Education.

CI-2

The Director will arrange for a parent meeting with the teachers in their respective classrooms. The Chairman of the Council will inform the parents of the function of the representatives to be elected in the Advisory Council and of the procedures by which the representatives are to be elected.

CI -iP

The parents of the children in the two kindergarten classes will elect a parent representative for each class to the Caribou Advisory Council for Bilingual Education, in September.

CI-1

OBJECTIVE

X

X

X

Accomplished Not

Accomplished

Partially Accomplished

Evaluation of Community Involvement Objectives

are listed above in the Description of Project Activities.

Dates of Council meetings

Comments

The Secretary of the Advisory Council will forward the agenda to the members of the Council at least 4 days prior to the meeting. X

X

The Secretary (Director) will arrange for site of the meetings and will disseminate agenda and minutes.

CI-3

X

e

Accomplished

The Chairman of the Council will arrange the schedule for the monthly meetings and will preside at the meetings.

CI-2P

OBJECTIVE

Not

Accomplished

Partially Accomplished

Evaluation of Community Involvement Objectives

meeting was elLanged.

Telephone calls were made on two occasions when the date of tlie

Comments

The Director will arrange for mailing the questionnaires to the parents and the Evaluator will analyze the data in June.

CI-4P

variables and parent interest. This questionnaire will be given in September and May/June.

A sociological data questionnaire provided to the project by Heuristics, Inc . , a consultant firm, will be mailed to the parents to acquire information on program population, background

CI-4

OBJECTIVE

1

Accomplished

X

X

Partially Accomplished

Evaluation of Community Involvement Objectives

Not

Accomplished

The Director analyzed the data in the Fall; the data and analysis are available in the project files.

garten students, then a follow-up survey be given to all parents of students in the Bilingual classes every two years.

The questionnaire was given in September only . The evaluators recommend that the questionnaire be given to parents of new kinder-

Comments

WAGM and TV (Presque Isle) WEGP Radio (Presque Isle) WFST Radio (Caribou) Aroostook Republican, Newspaper Bangor Daily News, Newspaper County Times, Newspaper

The Director will arrange for publications with the following news media:

CI-5P

The Caribou Community will be informed of the Project's progress at least once a month via news media.

CI-5

OBJECTIVE

X

Accomplished

Accomplished

Accomplished

X

Not

Partially

Evaluation of Community Involvement Objectives

year.

radio and TV coverage occurred in 1973-1974. Articles were printed in the Aroostook Republican and the Bangor Daily News during the school

longer exists. No

The County Times no

paper articles and two newsletters were published.

The community was informed by news-

Comments

X

X

The Director will also attempt to involve High School students by contacting authorities, class presidents , club and other student groups.

X

Accomplished

The Director will arrange for a parent-teacher meeting in September in each of the classrooms.

CI-6P

Parents will be asked to volunteer their assistance to the classroom teachers.

CI-6

OBJECTIVE

Partially Accomplished

Evaluation of Community Involvement Objectives

Accomplished

Not

c4

Activities other than working in the classr oom for high school stude nts such as speaking to student clubs, may be more appropriate for involving high schoo students so more may be reached. Also there is the problem'of schedi ling classroom visits by h igh school students. .

All parents were ask( d to participate. More parents of kindergart en students, than parent of Grades 1 and 2 stu dents, volunteered. However, periodic assistance was given to the other Bilingual classes by some pare ts .

Comments

The participation of children in the Bilingual Project will be determined by written parental consent.

--- CI-8

-,1

The Director will make arrangements with the University of Maine at Presque Isle or at Fort Kent to offer accredited French classes to the parents of the children enrolled in the protect .

CI-7P

Night classes in French, sponsored by the Bilingual Project will be offered to the parents of children enrolled in the project.

CI- 7

OBJECTIVE

X

X

X

Accomplished Not

Accomplished

Partially Accomplished

Evaluation of Community Involvement Objectives

Not only the parents, but some teachers and aides, benefitted from the French course offered through Presque Isle.

parents and teachers.

Two adult education classes and one class for college credit were offered and attended by

Comments

progress of the project by the Director, by the Board's represTitative on the Advisory Council, and by the Superintendent.

The Caribou Board of Education will be continuously informed of the progress of the

CI-9

Orientation meetings for parents, interested teachers and citizens will also be arranged by the Director prior to the end of the school year.

The Director will give directions to members of the staff who will be at the registration centers for incoming kindergarten children. These staff members will collect signed registration forms from the parents wishing to enroll their child (children) in the Bilingual Project.

CI-8P

OBJECTIVE

X

X

Accomplished Accomplished

Accomplished

X

Not

Partially

Evaluation of Community Involvement Objectives

parents were informed about the program at registration time, through letters and by the teachers.

No formal orientation meeting was held but

Comments

76

MATERIALS DEVELOPMENT COMPONENT

Description of Activities

The Materials Development Comnent was highly integrated with the Staff Development Component; therefore , some of the curriculum development activities were described in the evaluation of the Staff Development Component. As the curriculum and learning packages (units) were developed, materials to accompany these packages were developed. A portion of all workshop days was devoted to the development of materials to accompany the units developed. The aides were invaluable in developing the materials. The students at the University of Maine at Presque Isle developed slides of the Caribou community depicting industries , schools , churches , stores and all other public buildings , for use in the classrooms . Also, the booklets developed by the St. John Valley Bilingual Project were reviewed and found to be applicable to the Caribou Project; they will be used in the classes in the fall of 1973-1974; the booklet "Les Acadiens" was used during the school year 1973-1974.

students will also make maximum usage of equipment available to them from the Bilingual Project and from the University of Maine in order to develop audio-visual materials appropriate to accompany the Cultural Heritage Booklet.

local and state libraries, museums, etc. The

The students will make a special effort to use all the sources available such as consultations with the Bilingual teachers of Caribou, consultations with local historians, with local and state Historical Societies, with their professors, interviews of Franco-American people of Caribou, gathering information from bibliographies in

MD-1P

The students from the University of Maine at Presque Isle working under the supervision of the Chairman of the French Department will research the French cultural heritage of the Caribou area in order to develop booklets for classroom use in the teaching of Cultural Heritage in the kindergarten, first and second grades of the Caribou Bilingual Project. The first draft of the booklet will be completed by January, 1974.

MD-1

OBJECTIVE

X

Accomplished

1

I

i

!

X

Not

Accomplished

Partially Accomplished

Evaluation of Materials Development Objectives

at Presque Isle developed slides of the Caribou cemmunity. A narrative to accompany these slides was developed.

University of Maine

The students at the

Comments

semester .

a classification procedure for these tapes. These tapes will be recorded in the Northern Maine area during the first semester and in other North American French localities in the second

The students from UMPI will collect samples of North American French on tape and will develop

MD-3

The students will meet with the bilingual staff which will make recommendations of corrections, changes and technical arrangement to be made on the first draft. The students will then collect data, pictures, and develop the booklet according to the recommendations received from the staff.

MD-2P

The students from the University of Maine at Presque Isle will develop a final booklet on the cultural heritage of Caribou for grades K, 1, and 2 by June 1974.

MD-2

OBJECTWE

Accomplished I

I

Accomplished

X

X

X

Not

Accomplished

Partially

Evaluation of 'Materials Development Objectives

only .

Tapes were recorded in the Northern Maine area

to discuss their progress.

The students met with the staff at various times

Sections of such a booklet have been prepared.

Comments

The students will consult with the Bilingual Staff and will use facilities provided by the University of Maine and by the Bilingual project to develop these materials. They will use all materials collected such as pictures taken from the area, data collected in the local area, materials provided to them by the Bilingual teachers, consultation with their professor, etc.

MD-4P

language arts, etc. to assist the teacher.

The students from UMPI will collect data and develop French audio-visUal materials for the classroom for other subjects such as math,

MD-4

N.B. to nearby localities, Greenville area in N H. , Franco-American localities in Vermont and Massachusetts.

The students from UMPI will develop a questionnaire for interviews and will plan trips to the following areas: Southern Maine, Edmundston

MD-3P

OBJECTIVE

X

Accomplished

X

Partially Accomplished

Evaluation of Materials Development Objectives

Accomplished

Not

The questionnaire was developed and used in local areas only.

Comments

80

MANAGEMENT COMPONENT

Description of Activities The organizational chart of Figure 1 shows the management relationships for the Title VII program. The qualifications and responsibilities of the staff and administration cited in the project's Proposal have been met. The suggested management schedule with some minor modifications was accomplished. A copy of the schedule follows. The project: 1.

Completed quarterly and monthly fiscal reports when due.

2.

Held pre-service and in-service training as scheduledconsultants were Dr. Norman Dube and Sister Yolande Plante; implemented plans for summer training as scheduled.

3.

Ordered materials and equipment in the Fall, 1973 and March, 1974.

4.

Pre-testing in September , 1973 and post-tested in May , 1974.

5.

Observed instructional processes regularly from September to June.

6.

Submitted news releases bi-monthly to the Aroostook Republican, Bangor Daily News and the St. John Valley Times.

7.

Held monthly meetings of the Advisory Council.

8.

Held monthly staff meetings .

9.

Held three parent meetings during the year.

10.

Attended a variety of conferences; the director attended the following meetings: the Congressional delegation from Louisiana and New England in Washington in July , in Manchester , N.H. for the organization of Codofine, Title VII Directors' meeting in Lafayette, Louisiana in February , ACTFL Conference in Boston in November; the Evaluator/ Curriculum Coordinator and two teachers also attended the ACTFL Conference and workshop; the director attended an informational meeting about the new guidelines for 1974-1975 proposal with the Assistant Superintendent in Augusta, Maine in January; the evaluator attended Conference in Denver, in March for Teachers of English to Students of Other Languages (TESOL).

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11.

Conducted the Matched Guise Program in September, 1973.

12.

Submitted the continuation proposal in February, 1974.

13.

Disseminated information to the Superintendent regularly

14.

Submitted regular progress reports to the Director.

15.

Prepared the Final Evaluation Report.

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Figure 1 ORGANIZATION CHART

I PARENTS I

I BOARD OF EDUCATION

SUPT . OF SCHOOLS

ASS'T SUPT. OF SCHOOLS I

ADVISORY COUNCIL I

I

I ELEMENTARY SUPERVISOR I

I DIRECTOR1

I

I PRINCIPALS 1

EVALUATOR CURRICULUM COORDINATOR(

TEACHER I

STUDENTS

I TEACHER AIDES I

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MANAGEMENT SCHEDULE 1974

75

July 1974

August 1974

- Equipment and materials requisition sent in Quarterly fiscal report

Summer staff training Begin pre-testing Prepare materials development guidelines for students at University of Maine at Presque Isle Staff meeting

October 1974

November 1974

- Quarterly fiscal report Advisory Council Meet-

ing Night classes for parents of students in the project In-service training Class observation by Director and Evaluator Staff meeting - Report from Materials Development Super-

visor

September 1974

Finish pre-testing Advisory Council Meet-

ing - Parent-teacher meeting for election of classroom representatives at Advisory Council and progress report on the project

December 1974

Advisory Council Meeting

Advisory Council Meeting

In-service training

In-service training

with Consultant Staff meeting Class observation by Evaluator Meeting with Materials

Staff meeting Meeting with Materials Development staff Parents meeting

Development team from

the University of Maine at Presque Isle Report from Materials Development Supervisor News release

In-service training Newsletter Class observation - Begin Application for continuation proposal

C)

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January 1975

February 1975

March 1975

Quarterly fiscal report

Submit Application for continuation proposal Advisory Council Meeting

Advisory Council Meeting - Parents-. meeting

Evaluation Report

(progress report) - Application for Continuation proposal Advisory Council Meet-

ing In-service training Meeting with Materials Development Staff Staff meeting

April 1975

In-service training News release - Report from Materials Development Supervi-

sor Class observation Staff meeting

May 1975

- Class observation - News release - In-service training - Report from Materials Development Supervisor - Staff meeting

June 1975

Quarterly fiscal report

In-service training

- Fiscal report

Staff meeting

Staff meeting Advisory Council Meeting Parents meeting

- Staff meeting - Advisory Council Meet-

In-service training Advisory Council Meeting - News release Report of Materials Development Supervisor - Meeting with Materials Development Staff

Post testing Class observation Preparation of Summer training Newsletter

ing - Post testing - Final Evaluation report - Up dating of curriculum guide - News release

Training of new teachers

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SUMMARIES AND RECOMMENDATIONS

Instructional Component

Summary

The program students demonstrated statistically significant gains in all skill areas--readiness (kindergarten) , reading and mathematics in first language. second language, content areas of reading, mathematics, science, and social studies (kindergarten and Grade 1) , and social-emotional development. Furthermore English-dominant students earned scores appropriate for their actual grade placement on all subtests measuring their reading and mathematics in English skills. In addition, they performed as well as comparison non-program classes,. suggesting that participation in the Bilingual Program is not delaying their skill acquisition. All Kindergarten and Grade 1 Product Objectives were accomplished. Grade 2 objectives were developed during the school year, and some specific and subobjectives were found to be unrealistic or too difficult. Plans are being formulated at this time to revise and improve these during the summer workshops.

The Process objectives were realistic and applicable to the Kindergarten, Grade 1 and Grade 2 levels. Students showed high motivation and enthusiasm. All processes were performed with satisfactory frequency . Materials specified in the objectives including the System 80, additional filmstrips and tapes were used effectively. All materials ordered were received before the end of the school year 1974, and used for the classroom processes as they were received. In addition to activities specified in the process objectives, other noteworthy activities occurred. The classes were individualized and achievement folders were maintained for the students. More games were introduced. Classes experienced many field trips, including one to an Animal Farm in Houlton, a distance of over 50 miles. Visits to a Nursing Home in Caribou were very beneficial to the elderly , and a rewarding experience for the students. A classroom circus was developed after the Bilingual classes were invited to the Shriner's Circus as guests of McDonald's of Caribou. Plays and skits were presented for the parents and citizens in the community .

Classroom activities and public meetings were video-taped but, due to unforeseen mechanical trouble, were not satisfactory. Much more video-taping will be done during 1974-1975 now that the equipment has been repaired. Videotapes will be used for teacher self-evaluation and for sharing activities within the program. The Bilingual classes shared activities with non-program classes, and

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the rapport is excellent. A large number of parent volunteers participated in the kindergarten classes , but a much smaller number participated in the Grade 1 and Grade 2 classes . Recommendations

The evaluator recommends that for the 1974-1975 program: 1.

The specific objectives and sub-objectives especially for Grade 2 be reviewed and revised.

2.

Monitoring global objectives with specific and sub-objectives be continued.

3.

Methods of instruction for Grade 2 French mathematics be reviewed to try to improve performance on oral and graphic numerals 1-100.

4.. Emphasis on improving French oral language development be continued in all classes . 5.

Individualization of classes continue as effectively as during the past school year.

6. Oral language development in French continue with more

emphasis on student participation. 7.

Checklists to measure product and process be reviewed and revised so that new materials be included.

8.

Vocabulary lists for Grade 2 be reviewed and revised.

9.

Curriculum for Grade 2 be reviewed and revised with specific and sub-objectives.

10.

Field trips be continued.

11.

Interaction between program and non-program classes be expanded.

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Staff Development Component Summary

The program staff was very enthusiastic about the in-service activities. Workshops were offered for the staff (teachers and aides) and were well attended (90% overall average). The content of these workshops dealt with the development of learning packages, curriculum development, research on culture and heritage, and materials development. The Director and Evaluator/Curriculum Coordinator and two members of the teaching staff attended the Convention and Workshop of the American Council for Teachers of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) in Boston in November. In February, the Director met with other Directors of the French-English Bilingual Programs in Louisiana, and reviewed the goals and objectives of their programs and discussed projections for 1974-1975. The Evaluator/Curriculum Coordinator attended the Convention and Workshops in Denver, Colorado of the Teachers of English to Students of Other Languages (TESOL) in March. The major theme of the convention dealt with improving the evaluation system in the Bilingual programs. In April, the Director and the Evaluator/Curriculum Coordinator attended a meeting in Boston of the French Title VII Curriculum Coordinators and Evaluators. This was an informal meeting where an exchange of ideas about project activities and discussion of problems occurred.

In April, the project was visited by three teachers from Louisiana, one representative from each parish; (New Iberia, Lafayette, and St. Martin); the project staff reported that this visit was very valuable. The Caribou Program's two second grade teachers were awarded the French Embassy Grant to participate in a fourweek summer program in France.

Recommendations

The teachers and aides and the administrative staff are to be commended for their interest, enthusiasm and cooperation in attending workshops and conferences, and for devoting so much time to the success and implementation of the program. The evaluator recommends that 1.

The summer workshops be held prior to the week before school starts in August.

2.

The third grade teachers and aides attend a two-week workshop in August.

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3.

The kindergarten, first grade, and second grade teachers and aides attended a one-week workshop in August.

4.

Eight Saturday workshops to be held during the school year with Dr. Norman Dube.

5.

Eight other days be set aside during the school year for workshops with Sister Yolande Plante and/or for independent work on the development and revision of the curriculum.

6.

Emphasis be placed on training and helping the third grade teachers to develop and implement their program.

7.

Kindergarten , first grade, and second grade teachers continue to develop teaching units and materials and to expand and revise their curriculum.

8.

Members of the staff who can attend, take advantage of the Conferences offered during the year and make a report for dissemination to those who are unable to attend.

9.

Development of teaching units and materials to be shared between the grade levels be continued.

10.

Other teachers in the Caribou School System be invited to participate in the workshops offered in the Bilingual program.

Community Involvement-,Component Summary

The community is becoming more aware of the Caribou Bilingual Project, accomplishments and activities. An indication of this awareness , and of the perceived need for this program was that more than one-half of the kindergarten

registrations this spring was for the Bilingual classes. Activities of the component include the following: 1.

Advisory Council meetings were held from September to June.

2.

Two newsletters were published and disseminated in the community in January and in June.

89

3.

Adult classes in French were held, and college course was offered through the University of Maine at Presque Isle.

4.

Two program classes performed skits for the Nursing Home for the elderly .

5.

The Bilingual classes were sponsored by McDonald's of Caribou for the Shriner's Circus.

6.

Three parent and public meetings were held during the year.

7.

The Project helped sponsor "La Machine Magique" on station MPBN at the University of Maine in Orono.

8.

Parent volunteers were used in all classrooms , but most regularly in the kindergarten classes.

9.

The Matched Guise Testing program was conducted in the fall, 1973.

10.

News releases were written and photographs were taken of the activities conducted in the classrooms; these appeared in local and area newspapers frequently.

11.

A sociological data questionnaire was mailed to the parents to acquire information on program population, background variables , and parent interests for use in the planning program activities in the fall, 1973.

Recommendations

The evaluator recommends that 1.

The Advisory Council continue to hold monthly meetings from September to June.

2.

Two newsletters be published during the school year.

3.

The adult education classes offer French courses for parents and interested citizens.

4.

More classes participate in some social service in the community.

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5.

Three parent and public meetings be held during the school year 1974-1975 in September, February and June.

6.

Sponsorship of "La Machine Magique" continue for 19741975.

7.

The parent volunteer assistance program continue, and be expanded in grades one, two and three.

8.

Bi-monthly news releases continue, accompanied with pictures when possible.

9.

The sociological data questionnaire be given to the parents of the kindergarten students each fall, then a follow-up be done at the end of two years.

10.

A complete lesson in French be videotaped in each of the classrooms during the school year, 1974-1975.

11.

Guest appearances for the director to speak on the progress of the program to civic and service clubs be arranged.

12.

Television and radio appearances for publicity be planned.

Materials Development Component Summary

Materials development activities were on-going during the school year 19731974 for the staff; they also participated in a more concentrated effort during the two-week workshop during July/August, 1973. The staff developed learning packages and developed the materials to go with each unit. One of the major problems in instruction has been the inaccessibility of the French students' cultural roots . Therefore, materials were developed during 1973-1974 for this purpose. Slides , tapes , posters , student booklets , and language master cards have been developed to correlate with the units. Three students from the University of Maine in Presque Isle French Department have prepared slide presentations for use in all bilingual classes in Caribou which are especially relevant to the social studies and language classes in the program. These students have met with the staff, visited the classrooms , and are aware of the need 'br this

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materials development. North American French on tape has been limited to samples of parents' , and students' language which is found to be most relevant to the classroom situation. In order to avoid duplication , all existing materials , slides , tapes , and posters from other existing French bilingual programs are reviewed and, where appropriate, adopted. The St. John Valley project has developed booklets about the culture and heritage of French descendants; these will be used in the Caribou project with some revisions. The booklets on the French cultural heritage of the Caribou area are being developed, but have not been completed; this development will be ongoing. Recommendations

Materials Development plans include the following:

The

1974-1975

1.

Booklets on the French Cultural heritage of the Caribou area will be further developed, with the emphasis placed on Grades 2 and 3.

2.

Taping of parents , students , and community French residents will continue to further expose the students to the French spoken in the area.

3.

The development of audio-visual materials will continue to be correlated with the teacing units used in the classrooms, with emphasis on Grade 3.

4.

5.

6.

Teachers , with the assistance of their aides , will continue to develop materials which are relevant to concepts and skills taught in the classrooms. The French Department at the University of Maine at Presque Isle will continue to correlate its efforts with the Caribou project in developing audio-visual materials for the program. Objectives have been developed 1:or the 19I 1 -19k school year and they will be expanded to include more specific objectives.

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Management Component Summary

In reviewing the suggested management schedule for 1973-1974, it was performed with the following minor changes: 1.

No pre-audit report was done as specified by the U.S . Office of Education.

2.

The staff did not visit other schools this past year; however, three teachers from Louisiana visited the project.

3.

The Interim Evaluation Report was submitted with the Continuation Proposal in February.

Recommendations

The evaluator recommends that 1.

The Interim Report continue to be submitted with the Continuation Proposal in February .

2.

Regular scheduled staff meetings be held on Monday.

3.

New staff members be hired in early spring to allow for orientation training.

4.

The possibility of expanding the program be considered.

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APPENDIX:

Reports About Students Who Received Special Services

Eight program students were evaluated by the Crisis InterventionPrevention Specialist, Mr. Steve W. Reese throughout the school year. Recommendations for teaching the child were reported to the teacher. Because of the students' progress in the Bilingual Program, descriptions of gains are included in the form of anecdotal reports in this Appendix. The reports which follow were prepared in June, 1974 by Mr. Reese; these have been included verbatum, with clarifications added where necessary and the names of the students and other biographical details deleted to maintain the students' anonymity.

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