ERIC ED280917: Project TRAIN, 1985-1986. OEA Evaluation Report

DOCUMENT RESUME UD 025 419 ED 280 917 TITLE INSTITUTION SPONS AGENCY PUB DATE GRANT NOTE Project TRAIN, 1985-1986. OEA Evaluation Report. New York ...

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DOCUMENT RESUME UD 025 419

ED 280 917 TITLE INSTITUTION

SPONS AGENCY PUB DATE GRANT NOTE

Project TRAIN, 1985-1986. OEA Evaluation Report. New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn. Office of Educational Assessment. Department of Education, Washington, DC. [86]

G008402152 27p.; Prepared by the O.E.A. Bilingual Education Evaluation Unit. For the 1984-1985 report, see ED 272 608.

AVAILABLE FROM

Office of Educational Assessment, New York City Board of Education, 110 Livingston St., Brooklyn, NY

PUB TYPE

Reports - Evaluative/Feasibility (142)

EDRS PRICE DESCRIPTORS

MF01/PCO2 Plus Postage. *Adult Education; Asian Americans; Bilingual Education; *English (Second Language); Haitians; High Schools; Limited English Speaking; *Parents; *Program Effectiveness; *Second Language Programs New York City Board of Education

11201.

IDENTIFIERS

ABSTRACT

New York City's Project TRAIN offers parents of high school students of limited English proficiency (LEP) an opportunity to improve their English-lenguage skills. The targeted language groups are Spanish, Haitian Creole (the largest group), Khmer, Korean, and Chinese. Classes are offered at four sites around the city. In 1985-86, the second year of the program, English as a second language (ESL) classes were offered at all four sites, and General Equivalency Diploma preparation classes were offered at three sites. The project served a total of 334 participants, most of whom improved significantly in ESL. Proposed activities were not implemented uniformly at all sites. More coordination is needed and these specific recommendations are offered: (1) the proposal should be revised to broaden the target population; (2) participants should be screened to determine they meet minimal eligibility criteria for entry; (3) evaluatio. 4,bjectives that require the tabulation of high school grades and attl:ndance should be deleted; (4) the Vanderveer Community Catholic Center should be monitored to assure more consistent service at this site; and (5) record-keeping and data collection should be adequately performed. (KH)

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"PERMISSION TO REPRODUCE THIS MATERIAL HAS BEEN GRANTED BY (..t.,-(-Filtz--

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TO THE EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES INFORMATION CENTER (ERIC)."

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office ot EduCational Research and Improvement

EDUCATIONAL RESOURCES INFORMATION CENTER IERICI

his document has beer reproduced aS ke,received from the person or organization originating it C' Minor changes have been made to improve reprocluctiun Quality Points ol vtew or opinions staled in this doCu-

ment do not necessarily represent official OERI position

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O.E.A. Evaluation Section Report Robert Tobias, Administrator of Evaluation Judith S. Torres, Senior Manager Grant Number:

PROJECT TRAIN

GOO-840-2152

Project Director: Mr. Angelo Gatto

1985-1986

Prepared by the O.E.A. Bilingual Education Evaluation Unit

Armando Cotayo, Manager Jose J. Villegas, Evaluation/Planning Specialist Shelley M. Fischer, Evaluation/Planning Specialist Margaret H. Scorza, Editorial/Production Coordinator Charlotte Revilla-Cerf, Evaluation Consultant

New York City Public Schools Office of Educational Assessment Richard Guttenberg, Director

It is .the policy of the Board of Education not to discriminate on the basis of race, creed, national origin, age. handicapping condition, sexual orientation, or sex, in its educational programs, activities, and employment policies, as required by law. Any person who believes he or she has been (4scriminated against shouid contact: Carole Guerra. Local Equal Opportunity Coordinator, Office of Educational Assessment, 110 Livingston Street, Room 743, Brooklyn, New York 11201. Inquiries regarding compliance with appropriate laws may also be directed to: Mercedes A. Nesfield, Director, Office of Equal Opportunity, 110 Livingston Street, Room 601, Brooklyn, New York; or the Director, Office of Civil Rights, U.S. Department of Education. 26 Federal Plaza, Room 33-130, New York. New York 10278.

4

A SUMMARY OF THE REPORT

Project TRAIN, in its second year of operation, proposed to offer 210 parents of high school students of limited English proficiency (LEP) an opportunity to improve their English-language skills. The targeted language groups were Spanish, Haitian Creole, Khmer, and Korean. This goal was to have been achieved through regularly scheduled classes in English as a second language (E.S.L.), General Equivalency Diploma (G.E.D.) preparation, and workshops on bilingual education. The program was to have been offered at three high schools and three community centers. To encol:rap parent attendance, the project also proposed to provide childcare servicv.:. The project employed fifteen staff members. These included the project director, two full-time parent training specialists, nine part-time parent trainers, one part-time office aide, and two part-time babysitters. The project began operating at the Vanderveer Community Catholic Center in Brooklyn in September 1984; two other sites, Walton High School in the Bronx and the Haitian Neighborhood Service Center in Manhattan, began operations in January 1985. In ts first year, 331 parents were served (315 Haitians and 16 Hispanics). In September 1986, the project was launched at P.S. 124 in Manhattan for Chinese-speaking parents. In October, the Young Women's Christian Association (Y.W.C.A.) in Flushing, Queens, was established as the site for Korean parents; in December, the Khmer component was implemented at the Khmer Buddhist Temple in the Bronx. In its second year the project served a total of 334 participants: 206 Haitians, 55 Chinese, 25 Koreans, 25 Cambodians, and 23 Hispanics. E.S.L. classes were offered at all sites; G.E.D. classes were offered at Walton, the Haitian Center, and the Vanderveer Community Catholic Center. The results of pre- and post-CREST tests, which were administered at the Asian language sites, show statistically significant gains in E.S.L. Data to assess mproved parental awareness of student needs and improvement in their attitudes were collected for only 89 Chinese and Korean parents, and indicate that their attitudes toward bilingual education improved significantly. Data to assess achievement on the G.E.D. examination were not provided. Extracurricular activities and parent meetings were organized at half the sites. Newsletters were developed in Spanish and Haitian Creole. Curricula on bilingual methodologies had yet to be developed and translated into the native languages of parents. The following recommendations are offered for improving the program: -- revise the project proposal to broaden the target population; -- screen participants to determine if they meet minimal eligibility criteria for entry; -- delete evaluation objectives that require the tabulation of high school grades and attendance;

monitor the Vanderveer Community Catholic Center to assure more consistent services at this site; and -- ensure that record-keeping and data collection are adequately performed.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The production of this report, as of all Office of Educational Assessment/Bilingual Education Evaluation Unit reports, is the result of a cooperative effort of regular staff and consultants.

In addition to those

whose names appear on the cover, Eulalia Cabrera has interpreted findings and has integrated material into reports.

Arthur Lopatin has edited the

reports following the O.E.A. style guide and has written report summaries. Finally, Joseph Rivera, Marcia Gilbert, Bruce Roach, Gladys Rosa, and Martin Zurla have worked intensively as word processors to produce and correct reports.

Without their able and faithful participation, the unit

could not have handled such a large volume of work and still produced quality evaluation reports.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PAGE I.

II.

III.

IV. V.

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

1

Proposed Program Current Implementation

1

PARTICIPANT CHARACTERISTICS

6

FINDINGS

9

2

Instructional Component Non-Instructional Component

9 10

CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

13

APPENDICES

15

iv

8

PROJECT TRAIN (PARENT TRAINING INSTITUTES OF NEW YORK CITY)

Central Office Location:

Office of High School Projects 1171 65th Street Brooklyn, New York 11219

Year of Operation:

1985-1986, Second Year of Title VII Funding

Participants:

334 Parents

Participating Sites:

Khmer Buddhist Temple Marion Street (197-198th St.) Bronx, New York

Walton High School 196th and Reservoir Avenue Bronx, New York 10468

P.S. 124 40 Division Street New York, New York

Haitian Neighborhood Service Center 2465 Broadway New York, New York 10025

Y.W.C.A. 42-22 Union Street Flushing, New York

Vanderveer Community Catholic Center 1404 Foster Avenue Brooklyn, New York 11206

Target Languages:

Spanish, Haitian Creole, French, Khmer, Chinese, and Korean

Project Director:

Angelo Gatto

I.

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

PROPOSED PROGRAM

Project TRAIN is a multisite parent training project in its second year of operation.

The project's basic goal is to offer parents of high

...chool students of limited English proficiency (LEP) an opportunity to

improve their English-language skills.

It proposed to offer regularly

scheduled classes in English as a second language (E.S.L.) and General Equivaiency Diploma (G.E.D.) preparat.on, related to bilingual education.

as well as workshops on issuas

The project also proposed to develop

booklets on bilingual education in the parents' native languages and to

publish newsletters on activities for parents.

The underlying idea was

that if parents had a better understanding of bilingual education, they would relate more effectively to their children. TRAIN proposed to serve 210 Hispanic, Haitian, Cambodian, Chinese, and Korean parents at three high schools and three community centers. staff members were to implement project activities.

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Finally, to encourage

attendance, the program proposed to provide childcare services to participating parents.

CURRENT IMPLEMENTATION

By the spring of 1985, the project had been implemented at Walton High School in the Bronx, the Haitian Neighborhood Service Center in Manhattan, and the Vanderveer Community Catholic Center in Brooklyn.

By the spring of

1986, the project's Asian component had been implemented at P.S. 124 in Manhattan, the Young Women's Christian Association (Y.W.C.A.) in Flushing, Queens, and the Khmer Buddhist Temple in the Bronx. In its first year, the project served 210 parents fully and 121 parents partially, for a total of 331.

Three hundred fifteen were

Haitians, of whom 287 attended the Vanderveer Community Catholic Center and 28 attended the Haitian Neighborhood Service Center.

Thc remaining 16

parents were Hispanics, all of whom attended Walton.

In its second year,

the project served 334 participants: 206 were Haitians, of whom 26 attended the Haitian Neighborhood Service Center and 180 attended the Vanderveer Community Catholic Center; 23 Hispanics attended Walton High School; 55 Chinese speakers attended P.S. 124; 25 Korean speakers attended the Y.W.C.A.; and 25 Khmer speakers attended the Khmer Buddhist Temple. However, data on participant characteristics were available for only 93 2

10

participants, all of whom were Asian.

Of these, 39 were from Hong Kong, 25

from Korea, 20 from Cambodia, eight from China, and one from Taiwan. The project was centralized under the jurisdiction of the High Schools Division of the New York City Board of Education.

The project director,

who headed six other Title VII programs, was responsible for administering the project, supervising staff, planning activities, and conducting parent workshops.

The Title VII staff also included two full-time parent-training

specialists, one to oversee the project's Haitian/Hispanic component and another to oversee the Asian component.

Both parent-training specialists

had many years of experience in education and community service work. Their responsibilities included organizing, testing, and placing parent participants; providing curricula and materials for classes; and organizing workshops and activities.

The parent-training specialists also coordinated

the activities of the nine part-time parent trainers who taught the E.S.L. classes that were offered at all six sites and the G.E.D. classes that were offered at three sites.

The part-time parent trainers included four Haitians, two Chinese, one Hispanic, one Korean, and one American for the Cambodian site.

All but one

of the parent trainers were employed full-time as bilingual teachers in the New York City Public Schools and therefore were acquainted with the needs of bilingual students.

The American parent trainer was a teacher hired to

teach E.S.L. at the Cambodian site.

Additional staff for the project included one part-time office aide in the central office, and two part-time babysitters at one of the sites. The program's overall implementation and its instructional activities varied from site to site, depending on the nature of the host institution

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and the on-site director's philosophy of bilingual education.

At P.S. 124

in Manhattan, Chinese-speaking parents were offered classes at two levels of E.S.L. two nights per week.

The Y.W.C.A. in Flushing, Queens, offered

Korean parents two evenings of E.S.L. per week.

At the Khmer Buddhist

Temple, the Cambodian parents met all day Saturday for E.S.L.

The Haitian

Neighborhood Service Center offered a Saturday session that included four hours of G.E.D. in French and one hour of E.S.L.

At Walton High School,

Hispanic parents met two nights a week; once Icr E.S.L. and once for Spanish-language G.E.D classes.

At the Vanderveer Community Catholic

Center, Haitian participants were offered three E.S.L. levels, high s

equivalency in French, high school equivalency math in French and Engish. and a literacy class.

The Vanderveer Center is the only site that did not follow the academic calendar of the New York City Public Schools.

Vanderveer used a

trimester system consisting of 10 weeks in the fall, six weeks in the winter, and 10 weeks in the spring. each trimester.

New students were permitted to enroll for

This system had been established at Vanderveer prior to

Project Train's affiliation with the center.

According to the Vanderveer

Center's director, this schedule is suited to the reds of a population characterized by a high degree of mobility into and out of the neighborhood.

The fact that the P.S. 124 and Walton High School sites offered evening classes to parents whose children attended these same schools during the day, helped to strengthen tiw parent-school relationship.

On

the other hand, the community center sites provided the parents valuable social services, such as immigration counseling, job information, and

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newsletters written in the native languages.

All the sites were

accessible, had enough classroom space, and were supportive of the project's aims.

Three of the sites had been changed from their originally

proposed locations.

The Khmer site was shifted from Walton High School to

the Khmer Buddhist Temple, which is also a community center for Cambodians, because it was believed it would attract more parents.

The Korean site

moved from the badly overcrowded Asian Education Welfare Center (A.E.W.C.) to the Y.W.C.A. in Flushing.

Like the A.E.W.C., the Flushing "Y" was a

Korean community center and published a Korean news:retter.

The site for

Chinese-speaking parents was moved from John Bpwne High School in Queens to P.S. 124 in Chinatown because it was closer to the homes of many of the parents.

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II.

PARTICIPANT CHARACTERISTICS

Although parents with at least one child in a high school bilingual program were the project's target group, in practice many participants did not have children in a bilingual program.

Some did not even have children.

Consequently, the project director decided that the proposal needed to be revised to include parents of children in primary and junior-high school bilingual programs, and possibly older siblings of children in bilingual programs as well.

This change has not yet been made.

The majority of the participants were recent immigrants who came to the U.S. to benefit from economic and educational opportunities not available in their homelands.

Most participants were highly motivated to

become proficient in English.

Data indicate that participants were

enrolled for an average of 58 days (S.D.=20.6) but were absent only for an average of three days (S.D.=7.8).

Of the 93 participants for whom data were available, 48 attended P.S. 124, 25 attended the Y.W.C.A., and 20 attended the Khmer Buddhist Temple. males.

Seventy-three (79 percent) were females and 20 (21 percent) were Almost half (46 percent) spoke Cantonese, 27 percent spoke Korean,

22 percent spoke Khmer, and five percent were native speakers of Mandarin. The educational background, skills, and needs of the participants varied from site to site.

According to the parent-training specialist and

the parent trainers, the participants in the Haitian Neighborhood Service Center program were young adults with an average age of 25.

They had

attended school up to the ninth or tenth grade in Haiti, had a good knowledge of French, and were preparing to take the G.E.D. examination in French.

The Haitians at the Vanderveer Community Catholic Center ranged in 6

14

age from 20 to 50, had poor educational backgrounds, and were speakers of Haitian Creole, rather than French.

One staff member commented on this

group's poor standard of living and its need for special assistance in learning English.

The majority of the participants at Walton were Hispanics from the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico, and had poor educational backgrounds. Most were illiterate in Spanish.

Even though they had lived in the U.S.

for several years, they tended to remain within their ethnic communities and consequently had little occasion to use English.

However, they said

they were anxious to learn English so they could communicate with fellow Americans, and be able to earn higher wages.

According to the Asian parent-training specialist and the parent trainer for the Chinese-speaking parents, most of the Chinese-speaking parents had received some education in Taiwan, Hong Kong, or China.

Those

from Hong Kong were the best-prepared to learn English because of their previous educational experience.

It was also reported that the most recent

immigrants were frequently financially hard-pressed and consequently had the least time to devote to their studies.

The Asian parent-training

specialist reported that male participants were having a more difficult time learning than females because they had to work longer hours and would come to class tired.

The Korean participants come from educated backgrounds; this facilitated their learning English.

The

ambodian participants, all of whom

were female, had widely varying educational backgrounds; some had hardly any formal schooling.

According to the parent trainer, some of these

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individuals and their families had been traumatized by severe political repression and violence in Cambodia.

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III.

FINDINGS

This section presents the assessment instruments and the test results used to evaluate participants' achievement and attitude change n 1985-86. The findings are presented by evaluation objectives, as proposed to and accepted by the Office of Bilingual Education and Minority Languages Affairs, U.S. Department of Education.

The project also proposed that the high school-aged children of all parent participants would achieve passing grades in E.S.L., native language arts, and content-area subjects; would demonstrate improved attitudes toward school; and would improve their attendance rate.

However, the

project director decided not to collect the data necessary for evaluating

the achievement of these objectives because t would entail tracing students in many of the city schools. impractical.

This process would be difficult and

Therefore, these objectives are not addressed in the

findings.

INSTRUCTIONAL COMPONENT

English As A Second Language By June 1986, eighty percent of the parents will master an average of one objective per four weeks of treatment using the Criterion Referenced English Syntax Test (CREST). This objective could not be assessed, as the data were not systematically kept by the teachers.

Attitude Change By June, eighty percent of the parents will demonstrate an improvement in attitude toward bilingual education as indicated on an appropriate education attitude scale.

9

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By June, eighty percent of the parents will demonstrate an increased awareness of bilingual high school students' problems and needs as indicated on an appropriate inventory scale of pupi'i problems and needs. Project-developed pre- and post-attitude and awareness surveys were available in Chinese, Korean, and Khmer.

However, these scales are of

questionable validity, particularly since students can see their pretest rating when the same form is returned for the posttest. were not used to measure the objective.

Therefore they

(See Appendix A for the English

version of the questionnaires.)

General Equivalency Diploma -- By June, forty percent of the parents studying for the General Equivalency diploma will pass the examination. G.E.D. classes were offered at Walton, the Haitian Center, and the Vanderveer Community Center.

Data for Walton and the Haitian Center

indicate that of 40 parents, 17 took the G.E.D. and 12 parents passed it. Thus 30 percent of those studying for the G.E.D. passed the examination, and the objective was not achieved.

But, half of those students were

enrolled for 18 days and the rest for 37 days; hardly enough time to learn all that is required for the G.E.D. examination.

NON-INSTRUCTIONAL COMPONENT Extracurricular Activities -- By June, eighty percent of the parents, will participate in one high school function/activity every two months as indicated by attendance records.

Data were not provided to show that parents had participated in parents' meetings or school activities at the Haitian and Hispanic sites. Because the parent-training specialist was absent, workshops and meetings

10

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could not be organized.

However, parents interviewed at Walton High School

reported that they had visited their child's school on parent's day. Project activities, such as parents' meetings and workshops, were organized at all the Asian sites.

Parent meetings were scheduled on a

monthly basis to discuss school issues, students' needs, and ether related topics.

Attendance lists from these meetings show an 80 percent attendance

rate.

Materials Development As a result of the program, booklets will be developed in English and each native language in methodologies used in bilingual education at the high school level. -- As a result of the program, newsletters (two per year) will be developed and published about Project Train in English and native languages and disseminated to project parents and other interested parties. By June 1986, the proposed booklets had not been developed and disseminated.

A guide to the New York City public schools, containing basic

information on the school system and city, had been developed and translated into Chinese by the Asian parent-training specialist, but it had not been published because of a copyright dispute. Of the proposed newsletters, by May 1986 only French and Spanish newsletters describing the activities of the Haitian and Hispanic sites had been developed.

Staff Development

The project proposed to provide a series of training sessions to meet the needs of participating staff members.

Sessions were to include pre-

and in-service workshops, conferences, and presentations on special issues.

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One parent-training specialist reported that monthly staff meetings, monthly workshops, and semi-semesterly pre-service workshops for staff development had been held.

Well-organized training kits were developed for

both the parent training specialists and the parent trainers.

These

included objectives, job descriptions, instructional objectives, and sample lesson plans.

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IV.

CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

Because of the absence of one of the parent-training specialists, the proposed activities were not implemented uniformly at all sites.

Progress

made since 1984-85 included the hiring of the Asian parent training specialist and the successf-A implementation of the Asian component of the project.

Parents interviewed during site visits expressed enthusiasm for

the project and reported they had a greater understanding of their children's educational experience.

However, in order for Project TRAIN to better fulfill its proposed objectives, the project needs coordination.

At present, there are two

persons who work independently on different aspects of the project.

They

need a director who will coordinate what they do and teach them how to keep and collect data for evaluation.

The following recommendations are

suggested: 1.

Since project services are requested by other than parents of high

school-age students, the proposal should be revised to broaden the target population to include parents of younger bilingual children and possioly the older siblings of bilingual children. 2.

A method for screening participants should be developed and used

at all sites to determine participant eligibility.

Once eligibility

criteria are agreed upon by all sites, the project should develop more effective procedures for identifying parents, e.g., sending letters to the homes of eligible Title VII-eligible students. 3.

Because participants' children are scattered across many city

schools, student data collecting would be difficult and impractical.

Thus,

the proposal should be revised to delete the objectives that 80 percent of 13

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high school-aged children of participants will achieve passing grades and that 80 percent of high school-aged children of participants will demonstrate greater attendance. 4.

Not all classes being offered at the Vanderveer Community Catholic

Center are sponsored by Project TRAIN.

The project might establish better

procedures to monitor who is being served and to ensure that the same participants are being served throughout the academic year, September to June. 5.

The project coordinator should make an effort to ensure that all

record-keeping and data collection necessary to evaluate all program objectives are adequately done.

This would enhance the quality of the

evaluation conducted and make it more useful in determining program effect.

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V.

APPENDICES

23

New York Chy Board of Education

1171 65th Street - Room 501 Brooklyn, New York 11219

Leonard Moriber. Director Office of High School Funded Programs

Nathan Quinones Chancellor of Schools

Eli Plotkin. Program Manager H.S. Bilingual/ESL Programs

Sylvia Ballatt Executive Director Division of High Schools

Angelo Gatto, Project Director H.S. Title VII Central Programs Janine Anastasiadis.

(718) 236-3427

BILINGUAL EDUCATION ATTIDUDE SCALE NAME

SCHOOL

GRADE

DATE

Introduction:

As a parent-student in the Title VII ESL program, your opinions concerning the bilingual and ESL programs are highly valuable. We would be grateful to you for your help in completing the brief questionaire shown below.

Direction:

Please indicate your opinion regarding each of the following statements used in accordance with the scale depicted below as a point of reference. Please use numbers only. SCALE

5

4

3

2

1

Strongly agree

Agree

No opinion

Disagree

Strongly Disagree

0

24

.

Nees'York City guard of Education

1171 &SA Sired Rem NI lirooklyn. New York 11219 Leonard Moriber. Director Office of High School Funded Programs

Nathan Quinones Chancellor of Schools

Eli Plotkin. Program Manager H.S. Bilingual/ESL Programs

Sylvia Ballatt Executive Director Division of High Schools

Angelo Gatta. Project Director H.S. Title VII Central Programs (718) 236-3543

Tim Fooh Law, Project Coordinator H.S. Title VII Central Programs (718) 236-3543

Initial (Sept.-Oct.)

Final (May-June)

to A. The Title VII ESL program has helped me for bilingual education understand the need for Limited English Proficiency students

A.

A.

to B. The Title VII ESL program has helped me Education increases realize that Bilingual my child's/children's academic achievements and performances in school.

B.

B.

made me realize C. The Title VII ESL program has and the need for more bilingual curriculum instructional materials.

C.

C.

aware D. The Title VII ESL program has made me of the effectiveness of Bilingual Education and the need for its support by the Federal Government.

D.

D.

improved my E. The Title VII ESL program has English utility skills.

E.

E.

'New York Chy Board of Education

1171 6Sik Simi Room Sal Brooklyn. New York 11219

Nathan Quinones Chancellor of Schools

Leonard Moriber, Director Office of High School Funded Programs

Sylvia Ballatt Executive Director Division of High Schools

Eli Plotkin. Program Manager H.S. Bilingual ESL Programs Angelo Gatto. Project Director H.S. Title VII Central Programs (718) 236-3543

SCALE OF PUPIL PROBLEMS AND NEEDS

Tim Fooh Law. Project Coordirwor H.S. Title VII Central Programs (718) 236-3543

NAME

SCHOOL

GRADE

DATE

Introduction:

As a parent-stue concerning the ' We would be grz brief questionaJ

Direction:

t in the Title VII ESL program, your opinions iagual and ESL programs are highly desirable. to you for your help in completing the '

',own below.

Please ind:f.cate your opinion regarding each of the following statements using in accordance with the scale depicted below as a point of reference.

Please use numbers only.

SCALE 5

Strongest agree

4

Agree

3

No opinion

2

Disagree

1

Strongest disagree

Room 501

Neo York Clip

1171 GSM Sireel

Board of Educe lion

Brooklyn, New York 11219

Nathan Quinones Chancellor of Schools

Leonard Moriber. Director Office of High School Funded Programs

Sylvia Ballatt Executive Director Division of High Schools

Eli Plotkin. Program Manager H.S. Bilingual; ESL Programs Angelo Gatto, Project Director H.S. Title VII Central Programs (718) 236-3543

Tim Fooh Law. Project Coordinator H.S. Title VII Central Programs (718) 236-3543

Initial (Sept.-Oct)

Final (May-June)

I.

The Title VII ESL program has helped me to detect my child's difficulties and weaknesses in the subject/content-areas

I.

I.

2.

The Title VII ESL program has made me aware of the special bilingual needs of my child/ children.

2.

2.

3.

The Title VII ESL Programs has helped to increase my interest and involvement in my children's education and school activities.

3.

3.

4.

The Title VII ESL program has assisted me in my investigation and selection of the appropriate high school and college for my ciald/ children.

4.

4.

5.

5. The Title VII ESL program helped me to reinforce what my child/children learn(s) in school.

5.

6.

The Title VII ESL program has taught me how to help my child/children achieve a sense of themselves.

6.

6.

7.

The Title VII ESL program has helped me to understand my child's relationship with his/ her peers.

7.

7.

8.

The Title VII ESL program has helped me to understand my child's relationships with his/ her teachers and other school personnel.

8.

8.

9.

9. The Ti..a VII ESL program has helped me to assist my child in obtaining more career information from public and non-public organization's.

9.

10.

10.

10.

The Title VII ESL program has helped me to obtain:more information about job training

.:prpgr400#Jot.

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1986
ERIC Archive, Adult Education, Asian Americans, Bilingual Education, English (Second Language), Haitians, High Schools, Limited English Speaking, Parents, Program Effectiveness, Second Language Programs
English