Remarks on university education in Nova Scotia [microform]

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PROVINCE HOUSE

f

REMARKS

UNIYERSITY EDITCaTION IX

NOVA

SC

By HUGO REID, PRINCIPAL OF DALHOUSIE COLLEGE, AUTHOR OF "TIIE PRINCIPLES Of EDUCATION," kc

PRINTE

HALIFAX: MES BOWES AND S0 2*f3.

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UNIVERSITY EDUCATION »

NOVA

SCOTIA.

The many

endeavors that have been made to establish a course of University Education in this Province, sufficiently show that great numbers have been quite awake to want of success* that has attended these

the attempt

is

premature, or that

inadequate, or in some

way not

tlic

its

advantages, wliile

tlie

efforts proves, either that

means adopted have been

well directed to secure the end in

view. 1

*

No disrespect is meant towards the founders and supporters of our presoiit Colleges, whose efforts to supply the advantages of a Collegiate education for the youth of this Province, are, indeed, most honorable to them. Every one must acknowledge the great obligations the Province is under to those who have begun and persevered in such efforts, under circumstances of great discouragement, and undoubtedly their labors have been of benefit to the country.' But when, in a population of nearly 300,000, including a considerable number of persons of ample means and superior intelligence, we find that the best of these Colleges has only fifteen students] of whom about lialf are preparing for the ministry, and that another leading one cannot maintain a Professor of Modern I;anguages, nay, not even a Professor of Mathematics— it must be admitted' that they have been anything but successful, and have not conferred on the people of this Province the advantages to be derived from an *

i

\\'

efficient University.

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.

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-

It willhanlly be muintaincl tl.nt the country -lvance.1 for the establishment of a rniversity' .n«, or even as a Helf-supporting Institution,

is

not yet sufficiently

As

a

mone^mak-

\ova Seotia ennnot

--ntau,a V>b.,c; an.lJf.eju.lgebythecxperieneeofothercot nes, U Ks doubtful if she ever will. No

where, either in present r ..pportin, I'niversities. Those of Oxlord and Cambn.lKe, Glasgow, Aberdeen and l),.blin, as well as the Cont.nental Colleges, are supported by liberal endowments,partly from the Government, partly from munificent bem.ests of private nubvulual.. These induce learned men to accept the chairs -to devote themselves to research and discovery n

ornu-r tnnes

subjeets-and

to

.lo

we

f.n.i

self

in their peculiar

hoM

out an opportunity of obtaining the education to that small class that appreciate and desire it almost every where too small to ;

r

I

hest class

renumerate the professor by their •'

ices.

A University is l.ulk of the

wants ;

designed to be

community.

It is

professions

are:

advance of the wants of the great

— ^^ •"

;

to foster

and encourage

literature

Its nnssions, besides

l.-To

who have means and

beyond

in

required to di.ect and stimulate those

to aul struggling genius

and the sciences. class

hi-

preparing for the learned educate to the highest point a certain

T (

leisure to continue at their education the ordinary school period, and who, mi.xins in

the

M-orl.l

With the accomplishments and higher tastes acquired at their Aim-; Mater, shall exercise an elevating and refining influence on the mass -.— lo assist and forward the education of those in humbler circum•stances whose talents render it desirable to secure them or

for litrrary

scientific pursuits.

views as they

3.-To

arise, teach

them

sei.e

new

discoveries and enlarged

to the class within their reach,

Tnd

thus aid in diffusing a knowledge of them and rendering them productive. 4.-T0 set aside, in the professors, a body of men of talents and acquirement, for the special cultivation and extension of literature and philosophy.

Wherever we

find a few with talents and a taste for knowledge • wdierever two or three are found witli genius and an ardent .ealfo^ literary or scientific pursuits, but without means to provide for the cultivation of these tastes and talents ; wherever there are a few

'

Viammmmffrrrmc:

t

f

with

suflflclcnt

Ijeiiif?

will

mcnns and

leisure to prevent the necoflstty of thrlr

sent direct from school to business,

find

mission and

its

its

ni)proi)riato



there the University

work.

If UniversiticH

were needed, and founded, nnd did jrootl service in the thinly peopled nnd semi-barharous states of Kurope, hundreds of years since, there is surely scopt for one such institution in Nova Scotia, a country that starts from the vantage ground of modern times, with their multitudes of new sciences and new arts.

The failure of the University system in Nova Scotia, must, I apprehend, bo attributed to imperfections in the means adopted for carrying it out and there appear to be three principal causes why

4

;

the attempts hitherto

1.

Waste

made have met so scanty a measure

of success.

of power and means in the endeavour to maintain in so thinly peopled a country.

tevrol T'olleges

2.

T I

:..

The sectarian character of these Institutions.

Tho

lo-^ation

in ih'* large

of the Colleges in coiuitry villages instead

ol

towns.

First, I would submit tliat a small province such as this, with a population of not more than three hvmdred thousand, cannot support more than one efficient University, and that the attempt to c

tablish

more

is

a waste of

means and power

that can result only

in failure.

Let us enquire what

is

necessary to constitute a University.

We

find in the College at

signed for

and

Edinburgh, exclusive of chairs especially dethe lea.ncd professions, no less than f/tcen professorships,

this University is considered

age in luiving no chair of "

somewhat behind the wants of the

The English Language and

Literature,"

no chair of " Modern Languages,'' and no chair of " Geoloo-v.'' that subject being included along with Zoology, &c., under "Natural History,"'

In University College, London, a more modern and which may, therefore, be taken as a better exponent of the demands of modern times, there are no less than twenfi/-one institution,

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iAfa



profeteorahips, bcsidci thoHc (Icsignccl pccniiurly fur youth entering

the learne«l profemionii.*

We

cannot hope to attain to anything like

some of the

aa cducutional hixuries.

]hit I tiiink

it

citlicr

may,

chairs in these universities

of these

pe«-hap8,

be co*iceilcd

nil!

;

and

bo viewed tliat

there

nxnnot be anything prctmuling to the character of a University, at all

commensurate with the progress of science and learning, with-

out at least seven or eight chairs, as follows 1.

:

fAtirury Department.

Enolish LANouAor., Literature, and Grammar and General History.

History, v Ith Comparative

TlIK Cl.AHSUAr, LaNGi'AOES.

MoDEUx Lanouaoes. Logic and Mental Philosophy. 2.

Scivniific

Depart tnent.

]NLvTHEMATics, with Mccliauics and Astronomy.

Chemistry, with Heat, Electricity, and Magnetism. Gkolooy axd I'uYsicAL (iEOGHAi'H V, including Meteorology, (i.

0.,

OiiOAXic

the Earth and Atmosphere.)

Science (Botany and Zoology, with Human Physi-

ology and Ethnology).

* The following are the Chairs, each University College, London

sor, in

filled

by a separate Profes-

:

Literary Department. Scientific Department, English Language and Literature. Matlicmutics. Natural Philosophy and AstroComparative Grammar. nomy. Ancient and Modern History. Chemistry. Philosophy of Mind and Logic Practical Chemistry. Political Economy. Botany. Latin, Zoology. (ireek. Geology aiul Mineralogy. Erench, Civil Engineering. (ierman. Mechanical Principles of EngiItalian. neering. Sanscrit. Architecture.

of

Besides these, there arc thirteen Professorships in the Faculties Law and Medicine.

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"I

poMiblo that

It is

the

two

In

able.

subjects,

tl

profcisor might he found

reducing the number to itven

last, tlio it is

;

but

capabU tlii^

{

of takitig

not desir-

present extended and atUanccd state of these various not to bo expected that one

man

can do justice to

more than one of them.

Now, it is liardly necessary to say that there is not the slightest prospect that, within a reasonable time, any one of the existing colleges can supply what i?, ccrtiunly, the minimum of professorial chairs for uii efficient university in this, the latter half of the

nineteenth century. instruction,

Undoubtedly, a large amount of most valuable

and an admirable course of

intellectual

given at such an institution as King's College

denied that the great majority of those themselves of

what a

its

advantages, and that

still

but

training, arc it

cannot be

might, do not avail falls

much

short of

university, in the present day, ought to be.

The waste

of power in thus attempting several colleges

ous.

We have

amply

suffice for the

we do need

two,

four or five professors of classics,

wants of

we should

this province for

— one

for Latin, the other

British colleges.

is

ruin-

where one might

many

years.

When

like to see them, not in separate col-

leges, but giving greater strength sity

it

who

;

and

for

efficiency to the

Greek, as

While we have thus

is

same univer-

usual in

all

the

several professors of classics,

each spending his time and talents and the means on some ten or twelve students (if so many), there is only one professor of chemistry in the whole province, no professor of history, no professor of comparative grammar and the English language and literature, and no professor o{ geologg* in different places,

college

In the present very extended state of these scienc 's, it is impossible that any one man can do justice to the three \.i c subjects, chemistry, geology, organic science. These form four distinct chairs in almost every European college of modern foundationchemistry, botany, zoology, and geology. The professot should not have his mind distracted with too many subjects. This is a point of no small importance, as may be judged from the advanced state of scientific

ships in

all

knowledge, and the numerous separate professor-

newly established

colleges.

m

8 more tlmn

Liigland, Mith A populution Mcotiu, huH not

more than

where the dcmocrntic inctit tu the ((rot^th (

ollegc for a popuhifion

nj'Htcm (^Ivch unu)iuul t'licouruge*

to tltut of

ei|Uiil

at a

;

number of being

h.irdly entitled to tliu nunr*.

olle'^ei,

— about one

have three or four

What wt want Muvci'ul first

more

only nbuut oiio

wu can

if

the sO'eulkHl ('oUe(j;cs are

in u very inefHriont Ktutu indeed.

for u p()[>uli'tion

for little

\a

province,

(hi«

Xova

Scotland, with ten timen the populution of (

In the rnitoil State*,

iuHtUutloim, there

i>e|iarutc-

Nova

lixty timet that of

Uiuvorsitlca.

Fcdtml

niul

of

reckon even ho many

c'ni,ht

Hcotiu, huH but lix

of half u million,

— while

wo

numl»or.

'.han half the

one complete und ellUlout rniversity, not

in

imperfect ones, each deficient in one or more pointn of the

We

'mportance.

know

thut the present system does not sup-

wo

ply one College meeting the rcciuiremeiits of the times, and

by the experience of other countries thut expected that

ever will bo al

it

Their sectarian character

U

'

.'

to

do

ice

cannot be reuBonubly

it

so.

the next impediment to the su ijess

Men

rf the existing Institutions.

arc averse to sending

\eir

t

sons

where they may ac(piirc a bias in favor of a different Church from that in which they wish o rear them and, ult'aongh thcro is no ;

doubt that the Profc>'sors and Governors of the present Colleges act with the strictest honor

on

this point,

from influencing in any way the

and scrupulously abstain views of such of their

religiou/*

pupils as belong to other denominations

;

the associating

still,

much

with honored teachers u'ul friendly f'llow students of another sect, ij

apt to implant a leaning towartU

the prejudices against

it

equally in favor of

sects,

;

a

happy

tluit

sect

effect,



certainly to moderate

in tiulh, if

it

operated <

when

it is

e^iprit

dc

all

in fa^or of

cordis,

but of more questionable advantage

one sect only.

IJosiiles,

which renders men reluctant

there

is

a sectarian

to aid in supporting

and strengthening other religious denominations.

These feelings combined must, and, as every one knows, do prevent the great ma-

Many

jority sending their sons to our denominational Colleges.

who would

take advantage of the existing Colleges, imperfect as

tiiey are, are repcll'.'d If

we

consider

from them by theii sectarian character.

the

necessary expenditure, and judge

by the

A

9 we may

experience of Mritnin niul the I'niicd Statci, thac f

popiilutlon of not leta

ft

modern

nivoriiity, ndaptctl to

I

Vmn

tim«'H, r(<(]titrei the

endowments nnd Htndcntk, can

for

much narrower

condition on a

and

n (jiurtcr of a million;

lUnomlnationa! ('oHj'gc, drawing on

Its

own Vet

my

thut

no

sert alone, or mainly,

ni'iintuin

basia.

cnfcly

support of

iftclf in

it

u

an

efficient

attempted

in this

P'ovincc to cittnhlish CoUcgPi for Bcctu iiamboring only a sixth of the nbovo amount. It

highly disirablc,

ill

««etarian corners, and

diHVrent religious views,

is

lost

n^ College,

thus early learn to like and '

;

report und moderation. education

yciith of various nligious

Intlcod, that

mtet and form tricnditups

tcctn slujuld

where

.

ail

to i$

tKut differences

rub

their

ott'

stte.n those of

of

opinion with

mixed

indirect but great benefit of

or the gioat majority belong to one sect,

simple reason that, generally, parents will aot rend their

for the

cliildren to the Collegen oi other denominati'ins It

c

also of the utmost importance to

is

which may indispose

men

own

than thoir

remove every impci

to giving their sons a superior c



"nt .»on.

.

There are so many plausible reasons for neglecting ihis, besides want of appreciation of the advantages of a College education economy, unwillingness

to

send their children too early from under

the parchtal eye, opportunities of settling them in business

we

— that

should be cuicful not to add to these the very unnecessary

objection, that there

is

no

c.ccessible College

but one of

sectarian

dcbcription. 1

am aware

that the different religious bodies require

cevtain

special professorships, for training their youth to the ministry

:

but

it (!oes

not seem necessary, in order to obtain this, that each sect

should

(if it could,)

lor

many

mointain a whole College.

in

and n small room

set

training for the ministry:

apart

fo*-

outside,

In this Province,

years, there will bo but few 'n each denomination,

the purpose, or u

would generally

University, in which

all

room

suflice.

sects

in the

in

professor's

the College

house or hired

Then, we might have one great

would unite

for the secular depart-

ment, while each would maintain such Theological Chairs as

might require.

Surely

2

If

all

I'rotestant bodies

may

unite

it

upon the

^..-l„

10 Chairs mentioned above

;

Roman

nay, even the

Perhaps they mi{jht not desire

also jciu.

to

attend the Protestant Professors of History and

phy

but

;

surely,

might

Catholics

have their youth

Mental Philoso-

every denomination of Christians, and even Jews

and Mohammedans, might unite to learn Chemistry, Mathematics, and Mechanics together, and thus, by combining their strength, have ore complete and efficient University, instead of several inefficient ones, which, besides their incompleteness, repel

I!

by their

denominational character.

The is

to

third cause of the failure of the universities in this province

be found in their situation, in thinly peopled villages in the

country, instead of being in the large towns is



in Halifax if there

but one, and

in Pictou, if a

The majority

of parents have a well-founded objection to sending

their sons

second should be required.

from home at the very

critical

period between sixteen

and twenty-one years of age.

They may appreciate the advantages of a first-rate education, continued up to the latter period, but think that the serious risks to which a youth is exposed when left to himself, freed from the parental control, guidance and example,

are too great to compensate for these advantages

they prefer sending him to business to occupy

under their own eye at versity should

and

be

this trying

time of

in the largest town, to

firesides of the greatest

number

;

and accordingly

him and keep him

life.

Hence, the uni-

be brought

homes

to the

of the class for

whom

it

is

designed.

But there

is y. t

another important consideration, ivhich should

lead us to place the university in the largest town. tution

is

or those

Such an

insti-

not only for those preparing for the learned professions,

who

desire to pursue a complete general education

invaluable also for another and a quite distinctj class

have a peculiar taste or aptitude'

for

some

;

— those

it

is

who

special department of

and who, for the public interest as well as own, should have easy access to the means of acquiring full

literature or science, their

instruction, extending to the

most recent and advanced information,

on

Take,

their favorite subjects.

cver there

is

for

example, chemistry

:

any populous community, a certain number

wherevriil

be

t

!

4'"^

11 gifted with a taste and talent for that science. It is for the public good that SMch persons should be able to procure thorough

instruc-

tion in clicmistry.

Their peculiar gifts will not then be lost to society and chemical science, and the various arts dependent on It, wdl be enriched by their after labours, if they have been well grounded in the principles and practice of the science, and placed ;

in possession of the latest views

and discoveries. So with mathcmatics, Mechanics, botany, zoology, geology, classics, history, &c.

I'

xn every community there are numbers

who have such peculiar instruction are required for the development of these jieculiar talenta and as the cities afford the greatest number and variety of such talents, it is iu the cities, above all, that the means of cultivating them should be supplied. Some would attend the chemical class, who have little interest in other subjects mathematics, geology, metaphysics, would be the at^ract^on for others. Thus, the university in the populous city aptitudes

;

»

"» - >;

the

means of thorough

;

;

most powerful

j

not only in

placing a

superior

education

within the reach of the greatest numbers, but in promoting that great general good, the extension and improvement of the sciences and arts, and in eliciting that latent talent, which must lie dormant and useless if not thus called forth into

life and action. that the Scotch colleges, notwithstanding some serious defects in their system, hive been of very great service to the ocottish people. Placed in the large towns, perfectly accessible on easy terms, devoid of any sectarian character, and affording the opportunity of studying any subject without the necessity of takinothers not required, (tliough, of course, there is a curriculum for a degree,) they have given a great stimulus to general

It is in tliis

^

has the

effect,

way

education

encouraged the study of every department of science and learnino"'

and fostered every variety of taste and talent. What can be a better instance of the inutility of the present

system, than the position of the one professor of chemistry in the

province.

Wasting at

Windsor when

his sweetness on the desert air,

Halifax,

with its thirty thousand, wants him, and the whole country wants him, and would have access to him in.

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12 the capital when, stationed there, ho would give an impetus to the study of this fascinating and most useful science throughoui the ;

and breadth of the land, and by lectures, practical classes and analyses, would greatly increase his own emoluments, at the same time that he wo Jd be doing an essential service to the pro-

Icngtii

In a young country like

vince.

devclope

its

material resources.

we

this,

For

desire particularly to

end we need professors of

this

clmnistry, mechanics, lotany and gcologi/

where they can

we

here,

; and we need them placed and stimulate the greatest number. Ihit

instruct

find the great, tho wonderful discoveries of the last tliree

hundred years

— —

far exceeding, in

physical science

amount,

all

previously

known

of

so rich in applications to agriculture, manufac-



tures, and every useful art laid upon the shoulders of one man, and withheld from the great bulk of the population; for he is placed exactly where he is of the Ipzzt possible use to tho greatest possible number.* It would appear, then, that a university, to attain the utmost

usefulness of which cess in a

young and

capable, and to have any prospect of suc-

it is

thinly peopled country, ought to be placed in

the centre of the most populous district. Scotia, if there ever

To

is

attain this great

that the efforts

end

made by

means and

of

Nova

it is

not necessary, nor

is

it

desire. i)lc,

various parties to establish colleges in this

province, should bo thrown away. to unite their

The University

be one, must be in Halifax.

to

If the existing colleges

strength, they could form a complete

were

and

highly useful central Institution in the capital separate, not one of these is a College such as tbe times require, and they are in situ;

ations

good

where they can get

to the country.

little

support for themselves and do

little

United, they supply means and materials for

an Institution that would

command

extensive support, and be a

real benefit to the Province,

* The Governors of King's College have rescued this province from a great reproach. But for this one appointment, it miglit be said that the collegiate system of Nova Scotia ignored the whole splendid range of modern discovery.

M nKWti

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Nova Scotia has need of a University to ])repare her youth at home fur the leurned professions to impregnate those who will be ;

her future public leaders with the refined and intellectual spirit imparted by high mental cultivation and am acquaintance with literature and science

to draw out and foster the native genius of her abroad a knowledge of the sciences and useful arts, by which alone we can hope to render available the rich material resources of the country. Who doubts that Nova Scotia abounds in natural poets, oratois, mathematicians, mechanics, and

people

;

;

to scatter

numbers of others

enrich and adorn their country, if their

fitted to

minds were stored with the by the requisite cultivation. Perhaps

requisite knowledge,

in this neglected spot is

and invigorated

bid

Some licart once pregnant with celestial fire, Hands tliat the rod of empire might have sway'd, Or waked to ecstasy the living lyre ;

But hnoidedge

her ample page, Rich with the stores of time, did ne'er nnrol.

That a people may take rank

to their eyes

avail themselves of all their resources,

and

among

the nations by contributing to the stores of literature and philosophy, they must have the means of educating the varied talents of their sons to the highest point. The natural force of genius will do

little

without information and training.

This was

the case, even in former times,

when the first prizes to be won lay on the surface, inviting men to gather them. If we cxam'-".a the lives of those eminent men who have enriched mankind by their literary works and scientific discoveries, who have laid the



I

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foundation of the present magnificent structure of literature, philosophy and the arts, we find them, with few and trifling exceptions,



have belonged to the most highly educated classes, numbers being founu among the priests and nobles.* All that the uneduto

^

* This will be at once seen on enumerating the names of CoperTycho Brahe, Kepler, Bacon, Galileo, Napier, Newton,

nicus,

Leibnitz,

Pascal,

Lyell, the

two Humboldts, Grotius, Montesquieu, Locke, Voltaire,

Adam

Hume, Gibbon,

Smith,

Bcntham, Byron,

wnmi

Boyle, Cavendish,

;T

kiw fm

Wa

..

li

or Scott,

^'u. }\ m- .u-timi

>

v.

.'

'

m

-m ^

t

Lavoisier,

Laplace, Cuvier,

Reid, Robertson, Burke, Johnson, Goethe, Bulwer, Macaulay, .Ssc.

MHia

li

b

MiMiii

lifif HliilTiMiJ«T

l

w

ill

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14 peasant or artizan has given us, Is nothing compared with what wc owe to the higlily cchicated class; the latter, too, a mere fraction, in point of numbers, compared witli the uneducated catcil

classes.

on

If this

was

true formerly, wlien the spoils to be gathered

or near the surface,

how much more must now, M-hen he who would find treasures must dig vast an amotmt of knowledge has been accumxdated lay

it

be the rase

:lcep

when

;

ment of literature and science, which must be known and upon by those who would add to the structure ?

The capital,

great educational want of this Province

with a

is

built

a University in

complement of professorships^

full

so

in every depart-

to

its

provide the

most complete instruction on every useful subject, especially on the physical sciences; and, with scholarships or hursaries, to place this

'^^

instruction within the reach of youth of talent and merit, who are unable to avail themselves of it from their own resources. Without some such institution the education of the country must be behind the age, and lielow the standard of that of uthcr

nations.

How

such an institution

is

to

be established and supported

undoubtedly, a question of some difficulty. undertake it, as an important national work

may

in old times.* tlicse

The

;

may

That

it

found and endow

will

1'

the existing collcf^es

unite and form one efficient college in the capital

wealthy inhabitants

is,

The Legislature may

;

or the

was so often done be done some day, in one or other of it,

as

ways, or by a combination of them, there can be little doubt. sooner that day arrives, the sooner will Nova Scotia

derive the full benefxt of the genius of her sons and the treasures of her soil.

* In innumerable instances in the old world and in the United States, educational institutions have been endowed by the munificence of private individuals, who thought that superfluous stores of wealth might well be employed in the extension of the means of ^

education and encouragement and advancement of IcarninoSuch were William of Wykcham, George Kcriot, Owens of Manchester Girard of Philadelphia, &c.

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— ._.i

-1.1

EDUCATIONAL WORKS BY MR. EEID. Mental Arithmetic, 1vol.,

sin.

3vo!

Is.

Sd.

Just

published. '^'^.P^'^"-

^^

C'"?»«"'8 »''« /'n/...-;,/.,

'? 1 learner 'ioTM" icainer lo «tu..v, aii.l hm immense variety ol iiiiestionH with the unswers, for the use of the teacher.

Supi'LeMBNT TO Lgnnie"s taining Dcrivalion and IltSTOr.IC "i>lEMORANDA,

TiiE Principles

"The work

or-

Grammah

Amlym

(in

of

ibr

and >•«/« for the mental ci*,rci9e, exercise

the press), con-

:<'eiitences.

3d.

Education,

1

vol.,

12mo.

4s. 4|[d.

one of a very high chaiacter, and we know of no clasH of educator., of wlialever ago or experience, who may not reap groat adv.-ntaao from a ca -eful ^^n^y of the volume. It contains a va.st deal of clear, sensible and well-arrangoil matter, and embodies n.ost valuable sugges ions ami directtons for the teacher.';- Scoilht, E
.s

'

.

suited

to

the correction of

some narrow,

partial, and

JVoncunformtHt. .''?[.'•

.^^^'^

^"^8

.

.

K

i.s

esneciallv

prejudiced views

"_

addressed himself to existing

difficulties and existinir possibilities in an earnest, liberal and philosophical spirit, and his little book abounds with acute observation and pructicnl suggestions."— I,«ffl,/er See also Alhevmun Critic, Educational Tivm, The School and the

Teacher, Pcjiersfor the Schoolmaster, &c.

Geograp.": for British America, 1 vol., sm. 8vo. Second edition, revised and extended. Is. lO^d. Ihe first edition was a vast improvement on what wo previously had The present one einbraces a larger amount of information, and much new matter not before published in any similar work.— St',o. Contains a greater amount of correct imformation relative to the 4mp rican Continent in general and the British Provinces in particular, than we '''"''"^^ *^ ^"'^^ •'"*''' '""» i" any similar yfovk—jin^iffonilh .

~

CM—

This most useful School-]>ool<. T. will supply a lon^ amongst the educationists of this Province.— ^or/nnV^CAromc/e

~ v„.,

felf

want

principles,—containing just the things whic'i "1 K^^f ai-e reqnire.1i^-^'""^! 't- n text-book for general n^.- Christian Messewjer. bee also Express, Wesleyan, Cape Breton Mws, Liverpool Transcript. «''»'^"7'^ Wester., .Xews, Journal, Recorder, Yarmouth Tribune, &o.

T^

IftlMu

— -"^^

*, \

f,',

[D.

Just

3(1.

d rulen for isntal

tlie

oxercis«,

con-

ess), 18.

4s. 4 id. of no class of cat adv;?ntago Icar, sensible,

aud

itgcstions

Journal. tory that has especially

is

wl

views."

and existing lis little

book

iiler.

hool

and

the

8vo.

ivc\.

lO^d. iously

had.—

d much new !

to the A.rne-

ilar,

than we

—An'igonish felr

;

;8

want

whic'i ai"e CI

Transcript,

Ji

1859
Education, Higher, Universities and colleges, Éducation supérieur, Universités
English